NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 41 of 81
THANKS FOR SHARING SO MUCH ABOUT THESE BEAUTIFUL CRITTERS- NEVER THOUGHT TO LOOK FORT HEM IN MY INNER CITY NEIGHBORHOOD UNTIL ONE DAY I OPENED BACK DOOR & LOOKED AT DEAD TRUMPET VINE, GIANT BIRD HABITAT, FOR CARDINALS AS USUAL& SAW THE BLACK/GREY UNMISTAKABLE SHAPE OF AN OWL BACK ! NOW I KNOW TO LOOK FOR THEM. BARN OWLS IN INNER CITY?
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 42 of 81

Image result for owl

 

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The subject here is The Owl.  Here are some quick-facts:

 

  • There are around 200 different owl species as we can see from the small sampling above.

  • Owls are active at night (nocturnal).

  • A group of owls is called a parliament.

  • Most owls hunt insects, small mammals and other birds.

  • Some owl species hunt fish.

  • Owls have powerful talons (claws) which help them catch and kill prey.

  • Owls have large eyes and a flat face.

  • Owls can turn their heads as much as 270 degrees.

  • Owls are farsighted, meaning they can’t see things close to their eyes clearly.

  • Owls are very quiet in flight compared to other birds of prey.

  • The color of owl’s feathers helps them blend into their environment (camouflage).

  • Barn owls can be recognized by their heart shaped face.

The sounds of various owls:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezaBqCf0hv0

Owls in flight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pWub12DUoU

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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 43 of 81
THANK YOU FOR THE CLARIFICATION. WHAT ABOUT THE "COO-COO-CA-JOO" CALL? AM I LIKELY TO SEE/HEAR THESE BIRDS IN NORTH TEXAS YEAR-ROUND?
( INNER CITY?) WILL TRY THE APP.
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 44 of 81

Pigeons and doves constitute the animal family Columbidae and the order Columbiformes, which includes about 42 genera and 310 species. They are stout-bodied birds with short necks, and short slender bills that in some species feature fleshy ceres. They primarily feed on seeds, fruits, and plants. Pigeons and doves are likely the most common birds in the world; the family occurs worldwide, but the greatest variety is in the Indomalaya and Australasia ecozones.

The distinction between "doves" and "pigeons" in English is not consistent, and does not exist in most other languages. In everyday speech, "dove" frequently indicates a pigeon that is white or nearly white; some people use the terms "dove" and "pigeon" interchangeably. In contrast, in scientific and ornithological practice, "dove" tends to be used for smaller species and "pigeon" for larger ones, but this is in no way consistently applied. Historically, the common names for these birds involve a great deal of variation between the terms. The species most commonly referred to as "pigeon" is the species known by scientists as the rock dove, one subspecies of which, the domestic pigeon, is common in many cities as the feral pigeon.

Pigeon is a French word that derives from the Latin pipio, for a "peeping" chick,[2] while dove is a Germanic word that refers to the bird's diving flight.[3] The English dialectal word "culver" appears to derive from Latin columba.[2]

Doves and pigeons build relatively flimsy nests, often using sticks and other debris, which may be placed on trees, ledges, or the ground, depending on species. They lay one or two eggs at a time, and both parents care for the young, which leave the nest after 7–28 days.[4] Unlike most birds, both sexes of doves and pigeons produce "crop milk" to feed to their young, secreted by a sloughing of fluid-filled cells from the lining of the crop. Young doves and pigeons are called "squabs".

 

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1280px-Rock_dove_-_natures_pics.jpgRock_Pigeon_Courting_02.JPG1280px-Treron_vernans_male_-_Kent_Ridge_Park.jpgPigeon_kid (1).jpg137396-050-EB74E80F.jpg

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 45 of 81

There is an APP you can download free called North American Bird. It has a lot of bird calls. I use Google Play Store. 

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 46 of 81
IS THERE AN EASY WAY TO TELL MORNING FROM TURTLE DOVES FROM PIGEONS? WHICH ONE MAKES A "COO-COO- CA-JOO" CALL? WHEN I HEAR IT, I'M SURE THAT'S WHERE JOHN & PAUL FOUND THEIR CHORUS FOR "I AM THE WALRUS"-"COO-COO- CA JOOB"!
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 47 of 81
I find mourning doves in my backyard daily. They love feeding with the other fowls that my feeders attract. Simple and yet beautiful bird.
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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 48 of 81

Great video of this amazing bird!

 

Link:  https://m.facebook.com/groups/146392852645831?multi_permalinks=398469317438182%2C398469137438200%2C3...

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Message 49 of 81

The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove familyColumbidae. The bird is also known as the American mourning dove or the rain dove, and erroneously as the turtle dove, and was once known as the Carolina pigeon or Carolina turtledove.[2] It is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American birds. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year. The wings make an unusual whistling sound upon take-off and landing, a form of sonation. The bird is a strong flier, capable of speeds up to 88 km/h (55 mph). It is the national bird of the British Virgin Islands.

Like other columbids, the mourning dove drinks by suction, without lifting or tilting its head. It often gathers at drinking spots around dawn and dusk.

Mourning doves sunbathe or rainbathe by lying on the ground or on a flat tree limb, leaning over, stretching one wing, and keeping this posture for up to twenty minutes. These birds can also waterbathe in shallow pools or bird baths. Dustbathing is common as well.

Mourning doves are light grey and brown and generally muted in color. Males and females are similar in appearance. The species is generally monogamous, with two squabs (young) per brood. Both parents incubate and care for the young. Mourning doves eat almost exclusively seeds, but the young are fed crop milk by their parents.

The ranges of most of the subspecies overlap a little, with three in the United States or Canada.[6]The West Indian subspecies is found throughout the Greater Antilles.[7] It has recently invaded the Florida Keys.[6] The eastern subspecies is found mainly in eastern North America, as well as Bermuda and the Bahamas. The western subspecies is found in western North America, including parts of Mexico. The Panamanian subspecies is located in Central America. The Clarion Island subspecies is found only on Clarion Island, just off the Pacific coast of Mexico.[7]

The mourning dove is sometimes called the "American mourning dove" to distinguish it from the distantly related mourning collared dove(Streptopelia decipiens) of Africa.[4] It was also formerly known as the "Carolina turtledove" and the "Carolina pigeon".[8] The genus name was bestowed in 1838 by French zoologist Charles L. Bonaparte in honor of his wife, Princess Zénaide, and macroura is from Ancient Greek makros, "long" and oura, "tail".[9] The "mourning" part of its common name comes from its call.

 

Mourning_Dove_2006.jpgZenaida_Macroura.JPG1280px-Zenaida_macroura_-California-8-2c.jpg1280px-California_nesting_mourning_dove.jpg

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Message 50 of 81

THE BLACK HERON

Image result for pictures of black herons

The black heron is a medium-sized (42.5–66 cm in height), black-plumaged heron with black bill, lores, legs and yellow feet. In breeding plumage it grows long plumes on the crown and nape.

 

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Distribution and Habitat

The black heron occurs patchily through Sub-Saharan Africa, from Senegal and Sudan to South Africa, but is found mainly on the eastern half of the continent and in Madasgacar. It has also been observed in Greece and Italy.

It prefers shallow open waters, such as the edges of freshwater lakes and ponds. It may also be found in marshes, river edges, rice fields, and seasonally flooded grasslands. In coastal areas, it may be found feeding along tidal rivers and creeks, in alkaline lakes, and tidal flats.

Habits

The black heron uses a hunting method called canopy feeding—it uses its wings like an umbrella, creating shade that attracts fish.

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WATCH:  The video below describes what the heron is doing in the picture above:

https://www.audubon.org/news/watch-black-heron-fool-fish-turning-umbrella

 

This technique was well documented on episode 5 of the BBC's The Life of Birds .  Some have been observed feeding in solitary, while others feed in groups of up to 50 individuals, 200 being the highest number reported. The black heron feeds by day but especially prefers the time around sunset. It roosts communally at night, and coastal flocks roost at high tide. The primary food of the black heron is small fish, but it will also eat aquatic insects, crustaceans and amphibians.

The nest of the black heron is constructed of twigs placed over water in trees, bushes, and reed beds, forming a solid structure. The heron nests at the beginning of the rainy season, in single or mixed-species colonies that may number in the hundreds. The eggs are dark blue and the clutch is two to four eggs.

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