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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 41 of 77

There is an APP you can download free called North American Bird. It has a lot of bird calls. I use Google Play Store. 

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Message 42 of 77
IS THERE AN EASY WAY TO TELL MORNING FROM TURTLE DOVES FROM PIGEONS? WHICH ONE MAKES A "COO-COO- CA-JOO" CALL? WHEN I HEAR IT, I'M SURE THAT'S WHERE JOHN & PAUL FOUND THEIR CHORUS FOR "I AM THE WALRUS"-"COO-COO- CA JOOB"!
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 43 of 77
I find mourning doves in my backyard daily. They love feeding with the other fowls that my feeders attract. Simple and yet beautiful bird.
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Message 44 of 77

Great video of this amazing bird!

 

Link:  https://m.facebook.com/groups/146392852645831?multi_permalinks=398469317438182%2C398469137438200%2C3...

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Message 45 of 77

The mourning dove (Zenaida macroura) is a member of the dove familyColumbidae. The bird is also known as the American mourning dove or the rain dove, and erroneously as the turtle dove, and was once known as the Carolina pigeon or Carolina turtledove.[2] It is one of the most abundant and widespread of all North American birds. It is also a leading gamebird, with more than 20 million birds (up to 70 million in some years) shot annually in the U.S., both for sport and for meat. Its ability to sustain its population under such pressure is due to its prolific breeding; in warm areas, one pair may raise up to six broods of two young each in a single year. The wings make an unusual whistling sound upon take-off and landing, a form of sonation. The bird is a strong flier, capable of speeds up to 88 km/h (55 mph). It is the national bird of the British Virgin Islands.

Like other columbids, the mourning dove drinks by suction, without lifting or tilting its head. It often gathers at drinking spots around dawn and dusk.

Mourning doves sunbathe or rainbathe by lying on the ground or on a flat tree limb, leaning over, stretching one wing, and keeping this posture for up to twenty minutes. These birds can also waterbathe in shallow pools or bird baths. Dustbathing is common as well.

Mourning doves are light grey and brown and generally muted in color. Males and females are similar in appearance. The species is generally monogamous, with two squabs (young) per brood. Both parents incubate and care for the young. Mourning doves eat almost exclusively seeds, but the young are fed crop milk by their parents.

The ranges of most of the subspecies overlap a little, with three in the United States or Canada.[6]The West Indian subspecies is found throughout the Greater Antilles.[7] It has recently invaded the Florida Keys.[6] The eastern subspecies is found mainly in eastern North America, as well as Bermuda and the Bahamas. The western subspecies is found in western North America, including parts of Mexico. The Panamanian subspecies is located in Central America. The Clarion Island subspecies is found only on Clarion Island, just off the Pacific coast of Mexico.[7]

The mourning dove is sometimes called the "American mourning dove" to distinguish it from the distantly related mourning collared dove(Streptopelia decipiens) of Africa.[4] It was also formerly known as the "Carolina turtledove" and the "Carolina pigeon".[8] The genus name was bestowed in 1838 by French zoologist Charles L. Bonaparte in honor of his wife, Princess Zénaide, and macroura is from Ancient Greek makros, "long" and oura, "tail".[9] The "mourning" part of its common name comes from its call.

 

Mourning_Dove_2006.jpgZenaida_Macroura.JPG1280px-Zenaida_macroura_-California-8-2c.jpg1280px-California_nesting_mourning_dove.jpg

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Message 46 of 77

THE BLACK HERON

Image result for pictures of black herons

The black heron is a medium-sized (42.5–66 cm in height), black-plumaged heron with black bill, lores, legs and yellow feet. In breeding plumage it grows long plumes on the crown and nape.

 

Image result for pictures of black herons

Distribution and Habitat

The black heron occurs patchily through Sub-Saharan Africa, from Senegal and Sudan to South Africa, but is found mainly on the eastern half of the continent and in Madasgacar. It has also been observed in Greece and Italy.

It prefers shallow open waters, such as the edges of freshwater lakes and ponds. It may also be found in marshes, river edges, rice fields, and seasonally flooded grasslands. In coastal areas, it may be found feeding along tidal rivers and creeks, in alkaline lakes, and tidal flats.

Habits

The black heron uses a hunting method called canopy feeding—it uses its wings like an umbrella, creating shade that attracts fish.

Image result for black herons

WATCH:  The video below describes what the heron is doing in the picture above:

https://www.audubon.org/news/watch-black-heron-fool-fish-turning-umbrella

 

This technique was well documented on episode 5 of the BBC's The Life of Birds .  Some have been observed feeding in solitary, while others feed in groups of up to 50 individuals, 200 being the highest number reported. The black heron feeds by day but especially prefers the time around sunset. It roosts communally at night, and coastal flocks roost at high tide. The primary food of the black heron is small fish, but it will also eat aquatic insects, crustaceans and amphibians.

The nest of the black heron is constructed of twigs placed over water in trees, bushes, and reed beds, forming a solid structure. The heron nests at the beginning of the rainy season, in single or mixed-species colonies that may number in the hundreds. The eggs are dark blue and the clutch is two to four eggs.

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Message 47 of 77

Image result for tanager

Seven Colored Tanager

The Seven-colored Tanager is decked out in eye-catching shades of turquoise, green, blue, yellow, and orange. It resembles the Green-headed Tanager, a species confusingly known as the Seven-colored Tanager (saíra-sete-cores) in Portuguese. The Seven-colored Tanager is found only in northeast Brazil and is closely related to other colorful birds found in that area, including the Gilt-edged Tanager.

 

Image result for UNIQUE BIRDS

 

This tanager has a small, fragmented range and a declining population, due to continued habitat lossand capture for the cage bird trade.

Seven-colored Tanagers are usually seen in pairs or groups of up to four individuals, often in mixed-species flocks that forage through the forest canopy. Like other tropical tanagers, their diet is primarily made up of small fruits, berries, and seeds, plus the occasional insect.

Image result for seven colored tanager pictures

 

Fragmented Forest

The Seven-colored Tanager's favored habitat is humid Atlantic coastal forests in northeastern Brazil, but this habitat has become quite rare. Eighty-five percent of the original Atlantic Forest has been cleared, and what remains exists only in small fragments.

Other remnants of Atlantic Forest habitat are home to critically endangered birds found nowhere else, including Stresemann's Bristlefront and Banded Cotinga.

Image result for seven colored tanager pictures

Fortunately, the Seven-colored Tanager seems to adapt to secondary forest—sites where forests have been cut down and are now re-growing. But overall, the decline of the Seven-colored Tanager is an indicator of the poor state of the Atlantic Forest, where the species is thought to have once been much more abundant.

 

--American Bird Conservancy

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Message 48 of 77

I have been seeing this bird in my neighborhood so frequently, I thought I'd look it up and write        about it.  So here goes:

     American Goldfinch

A typical summer sight is a male American Goldfinch flying over a meadow, flashing golden in the sun, calling perchickory as it bounds up and down in flight. In winter, when males and females alike are colored in subtler brown, flocks of goldfinches congregate in weedy fields and at feeders, making musical and plaintive calls. In most regions this is a late nester, beginning to nest in mid-summer, perhaps to assure a peak supply of late-summer seeds for feeding its young.

   
 
Feeding Behavior

Forages actively in weeds, shrubs, and trees, often climbing about acrobatically on plants such as thistles to reach the seeds. Except during breeding season, usually forages in flocks. Commonly comes to feeders for small seeds.

 

 


Eggs

4-6, sometimes 2-7. Pale bluish white, occasionally with light brown spots. Incubation is by female only, about 12-14 days. Male feeds female during incubation. Young: Both parents feed nestlings. At first male brings food, female gives it to young; then both parents feed; role of female gradually declines, so that male may provide most food in later stages. Young leave nest about 11-17 days after hatching.


Young

Both parents feed nestlings. At first male brings food, female gives it to young; then both parents feed; role of female gradually declines, so that male may provide most food in later stages. Young leave nest about 11-17 days after hatching.

Diet

Mostly seeds, some insects. Diet is primarily seeds, especially those of the daisy (composite) family, also those of weeds and grasses, and small seeds of trees such as elm, birch, and alder. Also eats buds, bark of young twigs, maple sap. Feeds on insects to a limited extent in summer. Young are fed regurgitated matter mostly made up of seeds.


Nesting

Nesting begins late in season in many areas, with most nesting activity during July and August. In courtship, male performs fluttering flight display while singing. Nest: Usually in deciduous shrubs or trees, sometimes in conifers or in dense weeds, usually less than 30' above the ground and placed in horizontal or upright fork. Nest (built by female) is a solid, compact cup of plant fibers, spiderwebs, plant down (especially from thistles); nest is so well-made that it may even hold water.

 

 

 

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Message 49 of 77

This is a.......

Image result for kookaburra

KOOKABURRA also known as the Laughing Kookaburra.  Here's why:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=UXA0-YAoo9Q

 

ABOUT THE LAUGHING KOOKABURRA

The laughing kookaburra is well known both as a symbol of Australia’s birdlife and as the inspirational “merry, merry king of the bush” from the children’s song.

Characteristics

Native to the eucalyptus forests of eastern Australia, the laughing kookaburra is the largest member of the Kingfisher family, with females weighing up to one pound and growing to 18 inches in length. Its beak can reach 4 inches long and is used to snatch a variety of invertebrates and small vertebrates, including the occasional small snake. Since being introduced in western Australia and New Zealand, the kookaburra has angered farmers by preying on their fowl.

Image result for kookaburra

The laughing kookaburra has dark brown wing plumage and a white head and underside. Dark brown eye stripes run across its face and its upper bill is black. Its reddish-colored tail is patterned with black bars.

Laughter-Like Call

It gets its moniker from its manic laughter-like call. And its early dawn and dusk cackling chorus earned it the nickname “bushman’s clock.”

Related imagePopulation and Reproduction

Laughing kookaburras are monogamous, territorial birds that nest in tree holes. Females lay one to five eggs, which are tended by a collective unit composed of parents and elder siblings. Fledgling kookaburras generally remain with their parents to help care for the subsequent clutch.

Laughing kookaburras are not currently considered threatened although loss of habitat is a primary threat to the birds. They have adapted well to human development and often inhabit suburban areas, which provide both food and shelter.

 
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Message 50 of 77

1280px-Pair_of_mandarin_ducks.jpg

 

    The mandarin duck (Aix galericulata) is a perching duck species native to East Asia. It is medium-sized, at 41–49 cm (16–19 in) long with a 65–75 cm (26–30 in) wingspan. It is closely related to the North American wood duck, the only other member of the genus AixAix is an Ancient Greekword which was used by Aristotle to refer to an unknown diving bird, and galericulata is the Latinfor a wig, derived from galerum, a cap or bonnet.

 

Various mutations of the mandarin duck are found in captivity. The most common is the white mandarin duck. Although the origin of this mutation is unknown, the constant pairing of related birds and selective breeding is presumed to have led to recessive gene combinations leading to genetic conditions including leucism.[citation needed]

Distribution and habitat

The species was once widespread in East Asia, but large-scale exports and the destruction of its forest habitat have reduced populations in eastern Russia and in China to below 1,000 pairs in each country; Japan, however, is thought to still hold some 5,000 pairs. The Asian populations are migratory, overwintering in lowland eastern China and southern Japan.[4]

Specimens frequently escape from collections, and in the 20th century, a large, feral population was established in Great Britain; more recently, small numbers have bred in Ireland, concentrated in the parks of Dublin. Now, about 7,000 are in Britain with other populations on the European continent, the largest of which is in the region of Berlin.[5] Isolated populations exist in the United States. The town of Black Mountain, North Carolina, has a limited population,[6][dead link] and a free-flying feral population of several hundred mandarins exist in Sonoma County, California.[citation needed] This population is the result of several ducks escaping from captivity, then reproducing in the wild.[3] In 2018, a single bird was seen in New York City's Central Park.[7]

The habitats it prefers in its breeding range are the dense, shrubby forested edges of rivers and lakes. It mostly occurs in low-lying areas, but it may breed in valleys at altitudes of up to 1,500 m (4,900 ft). In winter, it additionally occurs in marshes, flooded fields, and open rivers. While it prefers fresh water, it may also be seen wintering in coastal lagoons and estuaries. In its introduced European range, it lives in more open habitat than in its native range, around the edges lakes, water meadows, and cultivated areas with woods nearby.[4]

Behaviour

Breeding
A mother with ducklings in Richmond Park, London, England

In the wild, mandarin ducks breed in densely wooded areas near shallow lakes, marshes or ponds. They nest in cavities in trees close to water and during the spring, the females lay their eggs in the tree's cavity after mating. A single clutch of nine to twelve eggs is laid in April or May. Although the male may defend the brooding female and his eggs during incubation, he himself does not incubate the eggs and leaves before they hatch. Shortly after the ducklings hatch, their mother flies to the ground and coaxes the ducklings to leap from the nest. After all of the ducklings are out of the tree, they will follow their mother to a nearby body of water.[4]

Food and feeding
Male flying in Dublin, Ireland

Mandarins feed by dabbling or walking on land. They mainly eat plants and seeds, especially beech mast. The species will also add snails, insects and small fish to its diet.[8] The diet of mandarin ducks changes seasonally; in the fall and winter, they mostly eat acorns and grains. In the spring, they mostly eat insects, snails, fish and aquatic plants. In the summer, they eat dew worms, small fish, frogs, mollusks, and small snakes.[9]They feed mainly near dawn or dusk, perching in trees or on the ground during the day.[4]

 

Threats

Predation of the mandarin duck varies between different parts of its range. Mink, raccoon dogs, otters, polecats, Eurasian eagle owls, and grass snakes are all predators of the mandarin duck.[9]The greatest threat to the mandarin duck is habitat loss due to loggers. Hunters are also a threat to the mandarin duck, because often they are unable to recognize the mandarin in flight and as a result, many are shot by accident. Mandarin ducks are not hunted for food, but are still poached because their extreme beauty is prized.

 

1280px-Buiobuione-mandarin-duck-warsaw.jpg220px-Aix_galericulata_-Bushy_Park,_Terenure,_Dublin,_Ireland_-male-8_(1).jpg1280px-Aix_galericulata_-Richmond_Park,_London,_England_-mother_and_ducklings-8.jpg

    

 

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