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Message 31 of 77

The brahminy kite (Haliastur indus), also known as the red-backed sea-eagle in Australia, is a medium-sized bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes many other diurnal raptors, such as eaglesbuzzards, and harriers. They are found in the Indian subcontinentSoutheast Asia, and Australia. They are found mainly on the coast and in inland wetlands, where they feed on dead fish and other prey. Adults have a reddish-brown body plumage contrasting with their white head and breast which make them easy to distinguish from other birds of prey.

67244781_667226253744631_7175031485475323904_n.png.jpg

 

1280px-Brahmini_Kite_(Juvenile).jpg1280px-Brahminy_kite.jpg1280px-Brahminy_kite_young (1).jpg

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Message 32 of 77

Dance with me Matilda!

Link:!

https://www.facebook.com/498491857181996/posts/894428627588315/

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Message 33 of 77

Could these seven reasons make you love seagulls?

Chip thieves. Noisy chip thieves. Noisy chip-stealing winged evil. Seagulls don’t have the best reputation. Seen by many as a blight wherever they’re found, they’d probably make a lot of people’s top ten things they could do without. However, they do have their fans. There is, after all, the Mobile Gull Appreciation Unit, a kitsch coastal treasure that celebrates all things gull. In an attempt to balance the scales against that one time a gull stole your lunch, here are seven reasons why seagulls are actually not all that bad. 
Mark Dion, Mobile Gull Appreciation Unit, commissioned by the Creative Foundation for Folkestone Triennial 2008.
 

1. They keep rats at bay

If it weren’t for gulls eating our waste, we’d probably have a lot more rats and rodents.

2. They provide a soundtrack to our memories

Even if their bolshiness isn’t appreciated, many people still love the sound of gulls at the seaside. Think of the herring gulls calling over the crashing waves in the Desert Island Discs signature tune.

3. They are highly adaptable

Gulls are masters of adaptability: that is why they have colonised our cities so successfully while struggling at the coast.

Where their natural habitat has declined and food has diminished, seagulls are suffering. However those gulls which have migrated to cities, which provide safety as well as an abundance of food, have managed to thrive.

Gulls are the kickass entrepreneurs of the avian world.

Brett Westwood follows gulls away from the sea and explores how they thrive in cities and at the landfill sites where birders gather to watch and ring them.

4. They have admirable traits

Even though gulls display many emotions which we would see as positives in a person (competitive spirit, willing to seize an opportunity), we disparage them for these traits. While it’s never a pleasant experience to have your lunch dive-bombed, maybe we should look at it from their point of view.

5. Spot the difference

Gull species are extremely complicated to tell apart and mastering it is the bird-watching equivalent of being able to distinguish fine wines.

6. They are more sinned against than sinning

In a study of human/gull interactions, it was found that a human was far less likely to be "attacked" – ie chip stealing – by a gull than a gull was to be attacked by a human. One man in Bath was regularly seen standing naked on his balcony swinging a samurai sword to deter gulls from nesting near his flat – a technique researchers said would probably work in the short term but is legally dubious having in mind the indecent exposure; and, of course, the fact that nesting gulls are protected by law. Not many people know that...

7. Yes, they can actually be cuddly

Gull imagery is also commonly used in sports: teams such as Torquay United and Brighton & Hove Albion have them as mascots (Gilbert the Gull and Gully the Seagull, respectively). Others including Blackpool Seagulls and the Helsinki Seagulls name entire teams after them.

 

65943914_2436052239791624_5364012624801431552_o.jpgaz_seagull-wpcf_520x300.jpgweb_a1_3701_2_laughing-gulls_melissa_james_kk.jpgLesser_Black-backed_Gulls.jpg1280px-Catching_a_snack_(5597547033).jpgKittiwakes.jpg1280px-Larus_marinus_eggs.jpgFlying_seagulls_at_Kiama_beach_during_Christmas,_Sydney_2013.jpg

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Message 34 of 77

Dear @l483260l ,

Here's an answer for your question:

 

 

WHITE-BREASTED NUTHATCH  Sitta carolinensis

White-breasted Nuthatches are small, insectivorous bark gleaners which also eat plant materials such as acorns and nuts. Although the species is generally resident, northern and western populations may irrupt in some years (Pravosudov and Grubb 1993). This nuthatch breeds in northeast Texas and the mountains of the Trans-Pecos with only one confirmed breeding record between, in the eastern Panhandle. These eastern and western population apparently belong to different groups described in the AOU Checklist of North American birds which identifies 3 groups (eastern, interior montane and Pacific Coast) with vocal, morphological and ecological differences (Am. Ornithol. Union 1998).

DISTRIBUTION. During the 1987-1992 field work of the TBBA project, volunteers found most White-breasted Nuthatches in Texas breed in the Pineywoods, (mostly north and central parts) and adjacent portions of the Post Oak Savannah regions (see the region map in Lockwood and Freeman [2004]). Breeding was also confirmed in the Davis and Guadalupe mountains of the Trans–Pecos and in the eastern Panhandle. North American Breeding Bird Survey (BBS) data from 13 routes produce a map similar to the TBBA map with the highest relative abundance (1-3 nuthatches per route) in east Texas and averages of <1 per route around the area of highest abundance and in the Trans-Pecos mountains (Sauer et al. 2005).

Texas is the southeast corner of this species range in eastern North American which extends west from Nova Scotia to Manitoba and south to the Gulf Coast states. In western North America this species breeds from the Pacific Coast east to the Black Hills of South Dakota and the Rocky Mountains and south to northern Baja California and though the highlands of mainland Mexico to the Isthmus of Tehuantepec (Howell and Webb 1995, Sauer 2005).

SEASONAL OCCURRENCE. White- breasted Nuthatches are resident in their limited breeding areas in this state. The breeding season is from early March to late June, perhaps later. Eggs have been collected from March 26 to April 2 (Oberholser 1974). TBBA atlasers found recently fledged young as early as March 27 in east Texas. .

In contrast to this data from the east, in Arizona atlasers found breeding evidence for this nuthatch mostly between late April and the end of July (Spence 2004), suggesting the possibility eastern and western populations of this nuthatch have different breeding phenologies and that White-breasted Nuthatch in the Trans-Pecos mountains may breed at a different time than in the Pineywoods.

BREEDING HABITAT. Oberholser (1974) reports this nuthatch breeds from low elevations to as high as 2700 m (8500 ft) in Texas. In eastern North America, this species nests in deciduous or mixed deciduous/coniferous woodlands, often at edges or openings (Pravosudov and Grubb 1993). In the interior west in Arizona 70% o breeding records for this species came from coniferous forest habitats and 18% came from deciduous woodlands (Spence 2005), while in Colorado about 68% of breeding evidence came from coniferous habitats and 19% came from deciduous habitats (Kuennin 1998).

White-breasted Nuthatches breed in natural cavities in trees, old woodpecker holes and occasionally nest boxes. The cavity is lined with various materials such as bark shreds, twigs, grasses, hair and feathers. In the cup she has formed, the female usually lays 7-8 (range 5-10) white eggs, usually spotted with reds or browns. The eggs look like those of the Red-breasted Nuthatch (S. canadensis) but are larger. The female, fed by the male, incubates the eggs for 12-14 days and the young leave the nest 26 days after hatching and then stay with their parents for several weeks. Only one brood is raised per year and brood parasitism is rare (Harrison 1979, Pravosudov and Grubb 1993).

STATUS. The species formerly bred on the Edwards Plateau and in the Big Bend area as well as further west and south in eastern Texas. Much of this range contraction apparently occurred before 1950 (Oberholser 1974). Currently White-breasted Nuthatch is considered locally uncommon in northeast Texas and common to uncommon in the Trans-Pecos mountains (Lockwood and Freeman 2004).

BBS data from Texas are too limited to provide a robust population trend estimate for 1980-2005, but data from 26 routes in adjacent Oklahoma produce a statistically significant +5.0% annual population change for that period. The statistically significant population trends derived from 1248 routes in eastern North America and 1824 across the United States and Canada are more modest, +1.1% and 1.3%, respectively, for the same period (Sauer et al. 2005). These figures suggest the current status of this species in Texas is probably at least stable.

Text by Robert C. Tweit (2006)

Texas Breeding Bird Atlas map

Literature cited:

American Ornithologists’ Union. 1998. Checklist of North American birds, 7th ed. Am, Ornithol. Union, Washington, DC.

Harrison, H. H. 1979. A field guide to western birds’ nests. Houghton Mifflin, Boston, MA.

Howell, S. N. G. and S. Webb. 1995. A guide to the birds of Mexico and northern Central America. Oxford University Press, New York.

Kuenning, R. R. 1998. White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis). In Colorado breeding bird atlas, pp. 358-359 (H. E. Kingery, ed.). Colorado Bird Atlas Partnership, Denver.

Lockwood, M. W. and B. Freeman. 2004. The TOS handbook of Texas birds. Texas A&M University Press, College Station.

Oberholser, H. C. 1974. The bird life of Texas. University of Texas Press, Austin.

Pravosudov, V. V. and T. C. Grubb, Jr. 1993. White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis). In The birds of North America, No. 54 (A. Poole and F. Gill, eds.). The Birds of North America, Inc., Philadelphia, PA.

Sauer, J. R., J. E. Hines, and J. Fallon. 2005. The North American Breeding Bird Survey, results and analysis 1966-2005. Version 6.2 2006. USGS Patuxent Wildlife Research Center, Laurel MD < http://www.mbr-pwrc.usgs.gov/bbs>

Spence, J. R. 2005. White-breasted Nuthatch (Sitta carolinensis). In Arizona breeding bird atlas. pp. 396-397 (T. E. Corman and C. Wise-Gervais, eds.). University of New Mexico Press, Albuquerque.

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Message 35 of 77
DO YOU KNOW IF THESE BIRDS WOULD BE FOUND IN NORTH TEXAS? OR THE SOUTHERN PLAINS? COULD THEIR ACTIVITIES SOUND LIKE A WOODPECKER?
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 36 of 77

White-breasted Nuthatch Adult

 

Birds of North America

 

Image result for White-breasted nuthatch

The White-Breasted Nuthatch

A common feeder bird with clean black, gray, and white markings, White-breasted Nuthatches are active, agile little birds with an appetite for insects and large, meaty seeds. They get their common name from their habit of jamming large nuts and acorns into tree bark, then whacking them with their sharp bill to “hatch” out the seed from the inside. White-breasted Nuthatches may be small but their voices are loud, and often their insistent nasal yammering will lead you right to them.

 

The White-breasted Nuthatch is normally territorial throughout the year, with pairs staying together. The male has to spend more time looking out for predators when he’s alone than while he’s with his mate. That’s the pattern for most birds, and one reason why birds spend so much time in flocks. But the female nuthatch has to put up with the male pushing her aside from foraging sites, so she spends more time looking around (for him) when he’s around than when she is alone.

 

In winter, White-breasted Nuthatches join foraging flocks led by chickadees or titmice, perhaps partly because it makes food easier to find and partly because more birds can keep an eye out for predators. One study found that when titmice were removed from a flock, nuthatches were more wary and less willing to visit exposed bird feeders.

 

If you see a White-breasted Nuthatch making lots of quick trips to and from your feeder – too many for it to be eating them all – it may be storing the seeds for later in the winter, by wedging them into furrows in the bark of nearby trees.

 

The oldest known White-breasted Nuthatch was at least 9 years, 9 months old when it was found in Colorado.

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Message 37 of 77
THANKS FOR SHARING SO MUCH ABOUT THESE BEAUTIFUL CRITTERS- NEVER THOUGHT TO LOOK FORT HEM IN MY INNER CITY NEIGHBORHOOD UNTIL ONE DAY I OPENED BACK DOOR & LOOKED AT DEAD TRUMPET VINE, GIANT BIRD HABITAT, FOR CARDINALS AS USUAL& SAW THE BLACK/GREY UNMISTAKABLE SHAPE OF AN OWL BACK ! NOW I KNOW TO LOOK FOR THEM. BARN OWLS IN INNER CITY?
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 38 of 77

Image result for owl

 

Image result for owl

 

Image result for owl

 

Image result for owl

 

Related image

 

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Image result for owl

 

Related image

 

The subject here is The Owl.  Here are some quick-facts:

 

  • There are around 200 different owl species as we can see from the small sampling above.

  • Owls are active at night (nocturnal).

  • A group of owls is called a parliament.

  • Most owls hunt insects, small mammals and other birds.

  • Some owl species hunt fish.

  • Owls have powerful talons (claws) which help them catch and kill prey.

  • Owls have large eyes and a flat face.

  • Owls can turn their heads as much as 270 degrees.

  • Owls are farsighted, meaning they can’t see things close to their eyes clearly.

  • Owls are very quiet in flight compared to other birds of prey.

  • The color of owl’s feathers helps them blend into their environment (camouflage).

  • Barn owls can be recognized by their heart shaped face.

The sounds of various owls:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ezaBqCf0hv0

Owls in flight:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=6pWub12DUoU

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Message 39 of 77
THANK YOU FOR THE CLARIFICATION. WHAT ABOUT THE "COO-COO-CA-JOO" CALL? AM I LIKELY TO SEE/HEAR THESE BIRDS IN NORTH TEXAS YEAR-ROUND?
( INNER CITY?) WILL TRY THE APP.
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 40 of 77

Pigeons and doves constitute the animal family Columbidae and the order Columbiformes, which includes about 42 genera and 310 species. They are stout-bodied birds with short necks, and short slender bills that in some species feature fleshy ceres. They primarily feed on seeds, fruits, and plants. Pigeons and doves are likely the most common birds in the world; the family occurs worldwide, but the greatest variety is in the Indomalaya and Australasia ecozones.

The distinction between "doves" and "pigeons" in English is not consistent, and does not exist in most other languages. In everyday speech, "dove" frequently indicates a pigeon that is white or nearly white; some people use the terms "dove" and "pigeon" interchangeably. In contrast, in scientific and ornithological practice, "dove" tends to be used for smaller species and "pigeon" for larger ones, but this is in no way consistently applied. Historically, the common names for these birds involve a great deal of variation between the terms. The species most commonly referred to as "pigeon" is the species known by scientists as the rock dove, one subspecies of which, the domestic pigeon, is common in many cities as the feral pigeon.

Pigeon is a French word that derives from the Latin pipio, for a "peeping" chick,[2] while dove is a Germanic word that refers to the bird's diving flight.[3] The English dialectal word "culver" appears to derive from Latin columba.[2]

Doves and pigeons build relatively flimsy nests, often using sticks and other debris, which may be placed on trees, ledges, or the ground, depending on species. They lay one or two eggs at a time, and both parents care for the young, which leave the nest after 7–28 days.[4] Unlike most birds, both sexes of doves and pigeons produce "crop milk" to feed to their young, secreted by a sloughing of fluid-filled cells from the lining of the crop. Young doves and pigeons are called "squabs".

 

anatomy.png

1280px-Rock_dove_-_natures_pics.jpgRock_Pigeon_Courting_02.JPG1280px-Treron_vernans_male_-_Kent_Ridge_Park.jpgPigeon_kid (1).jpg137396-050-EB74E80F.jpg

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