Reply
Highlighted
Honored Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
3018
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

3,018 Views
Message 81 of 263

@j952579d wrote:

Me too I'm new n have a hard time posting!!!! How do I put a picture on my post? Anyone pls help...I'm Julie, from Glendale, CA


@j952579d  Hello and welcome to the online community!

 

Here's how to post images. Above your composition screen you'll find a row of icons that look like the image below..

 

AARPComposition Screen Icons.png

 

Select Photos.

 

From there you can either drag and drop your photos or click the Choose Files button to upload an image from your computer.

 

 

Photo Feature Drag and Drop or Choose File functionsPhoto Feature Drag and Drop or Choose File functions

 

While at the Add Photo page depicted above, you'll note size and placement options on the right side of your screen.

 

Hope this helps. Post those gorgeous photos and have fun!

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
3018
Views
Highlighted
Regular Contributor
2
Kudos
3013
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

3,013 Views
Message 82 of 263

Me too I'm new n have a hard time posting!!!! How do I put a picture on my post? Anyone pls help...I'm Julie, from Glendale, CA

JMD
Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
3013
Views
Highlighted
Conversationalist
2
Kudos
2998
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,998 Views
Message 83 of 263

@a956730s  You have so much on your plate right now. I do know, it's a lot to deal with. One of the things you need to do is stay especially alert about what you are doing while driving, or using any tools, cooking, etc. When there is that much happening for your mind to deal with, it's easy to hurt yourself or cause an accident. So stay alert...

Next thing.  Find a way to get out of your head just to give your brain a break. For me, it was through listening to recorded books. There were times that my mind would have to be pulled back into focus, or a part replayed, maybe more than once. But with practice you will be able to do it. Before that, trying to sleep meant that the little hampster in my brain would be running on his wheel for most of the night. 

Then eat healthy meals and keep to as regular of a meal schedule as you can. Routine can be calming. 

Also remember to thank your higher power. Be greatful for what is, not for what is not. Stay strong. You will be getting lots of prayers and good thoughts from many people who don't know you, but feel that strength as it arrives. 

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
2998
Views
Highlighted
Periodic Contributor
1
Kudos
2917
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,917 Views
Message 84 of 263

I am so sorry for your loss. I lost my Dad when I was 20 in 1971 but we had to watch him suffer, he was 45. I lost my Mom in 2008, she was 82 and struggled with alzheimers for 11 years. Be glad your mom passed unexpectedly. You are never ready but atleast she didn't suffer. Hang in there Honey. I will offer you my shoulder anytime.

 

Kathy Mc

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
2917
Views
Highlighted
Newbie
2
Kudos
2912
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,912 Views
Message 85 of 263

Hello, My Name is Robin L. Gooch from Bridge City Texas.  I just joined AARP today.  My 50th birthday was Monday.  

I am looking for some advice about losing a family member namely a mother.  I am having a horrible time.  I lost her in Sept of last year unexpectedly.  Just need a shoulder to lean on or an ear to bend.  Thank you. 

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
2912
Views
Highlighted
Recognized Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
2932
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,932 Views
Message 86 of 263

WELCOME Andy,

 Wow 23 years, how GREAT!!!. 

  Taking time for your self and interests through volunteering, is a great way to grow as a person. Meeting other people is a great way to expand your horizon. There will be simple little treats that will come your way. New outlooks on current situations, ideas to share with your long time partner. Taking time for your self is very important when you're taking care of a loved one. I am Nancy, from New Jersey, if the 2 of you happen to live in this state, I have a list of resources that my help with your current situation.  Stay strong and  BEST wishes for both of youSmiley HappySmiley Happy

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
2932
Views
Highlighted
Regular Contributor
2
Kudos
2949
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,949 Views
Message 87 of 263

Ahoy Andy,

Ye know, the only thing that comes to mind, for me, for this situation (right now), is the fact that you said the volunteer work is the only bright spot in your day. Well, it occurs to me, that is that be the case, then your volunteer work IS 'what you do for you'. Do whatever it is that makes you happy, and what feels right. Take care of your partner, and do your best in  your volunteer work, as that is what you do for you -- and others.

Keep an eye on that Horizon.

Jack.

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
2949
Views
Highlighted
Newbie
2
Kudos
2926
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,926 Views
Message 88 of 263

Hi! My name is Andy and I am 52 and gay and caring for my partner who is 50 years old. We have been together for 23 years (today) and I can tell you we have we seen some good times, and recently some pretty bad ones. About 10 or so years ago my partner became disabled with a rare neuroligical disease and things seem to just have become worse and piled-up sinc. He was able to recover from the disease but soon began to have additional problems, one after the other. He hadn't been working for some years before it all started and has not worked since. I have been our sole financial provider for over 15 years and have been sole caregiver since 2006.

 

We both drank heavily most of our lives and decided to get sober about 6 months apart, roughly 7 years ago. I stayed sober and he relapsed after about 5 years, about 2 years ago. His drinking finally caught up with his liver and it failed at the beginning of this year.

 

The liver failure caused a "leaky" right heart valve which caused high blood pressure in the lungs, stalling the liver transplant evaluation that was already underway. The liver doctors will not evaluate for transplant unless they know he will be "operable", and he will not be operable until the lung and heart situation are stabalized.

 

That was six months ago and my partner has been home for the last 4 months and is on several medications to keep his liver functioning and his system compensating, while the doctors try to bring down the pressure in the lungs. We entered my partner into a medical trial for additional medicine for the lung problem in hopes of getting better care and that it may heal the problem quicker.

 

It has been a rough time caring for and watching someone who is gradually becoming less able to care for themselves despite all my best efforts. It is exhausting and frustrating and sometimes downright depressing.

 

I have a full-time job as a technical professional and I also spend a good portion of my free time giving back to the communiity that has freely given me my sobriety. I am thankful that the powers that be decided it was just the right time for me to be a sober friend to my partner. I am grateful for the higher-power that I found on my journey and for the fellowship and support that comes along with it.

 

Nevertheless, the feelings of inadequacy, guilt, anger, fear and uncertainty remain! I am putting all my efforts into caring for my partner and none into caring for my physical and mental health. I put the rest of my efforts into my job and volunteer work, which leaves little time for myself. I could cut back on the volunteer time but that is often the only bright part of my day. I am saying all this not to garner sympathy but just as a way to introduce myself and my situation, and state of mind. I am willing to take all advice and also willing to share my experience, strength and hope with whomever will listen.

 

Thanks for listening and I look forward to talking to you all!

Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
2
Kudos
2926
Views
Highlighted
Contributor
1
Kudos
2869
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,869 Views
Message 89 of 263

Tim in reply to your problem of extra support for your wife , I have a suggestion, when you are needing to cut down on expenses.but also have a helper need. My company recites also the family members of our clients to pretipate in giving care to their own personal family members.also if you feel that this idea is honestly of value to your problem I also have a advisory fee that is exceptable to me as the personal home anfd family living life skills/lifestyles counseling services counselor.of New beginning"for boys and girls only"self help overcomes mbsm . I would like to suggest that you hire one or more of your family members through the caregiver providers network let them sign in and get paid by someone else to provide care to you wife.keeping your money in you home and family financial budget.

 

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
2869
Views
Highlighted
Contributor
2
Kudos
2795
Views

Re: Calling all NEWBIES. ... Let's introduce our selves! Use this thread.

2,795 Views
Message 90 of 263

Hello.  My name is Tim and I live in Ohio.  My wife is in the chronic stage of MS.  I work a full time job and take care of her when I'm not working.  We have a couple of ladies who take care of her while I'm at work, but we have to pay for them out of our own pockets so things are always tight. I've been doing the caregiving for about ten years in terms of her chronic condition:  lifting her in and out of bed, dressing her as well as the numerous other personal care things that are involved in the bathroom, meals, meds, finances and so on.  I'm in relatively good physical health myself since I've made it a point to do the things to get that way and stay that way, primarily so I'll be able to take care of my wife and not have to use the healthcare system myself ( hopefully ), but still the toll of caregiving for so long in a chronic situation has taken it's toll in terms of what a lot of folks call burnout, I guess, mostly mental and emotional.  I'm not a quitter, but I'm also smart enough to know that I have to take care of myself.  Not an easy thing to do in terms of finding the time and resources when both of those need to go towards taking care of my wife.  I don't have an issue with that.  That's the way it should be, but I'm hoping to find some wisdom, tips, insights and experience here that can help me navigate the next few years.  All the best to all of you brave and courageous fellow AARP'ers.

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
2795
Views
cancel
Showing results for 
Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Announcements

When responding to other users’ posts for penpals, dating, or for other communication, please do not post your personal information (email, address, phone number) in the forum.

Top Authors