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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 21 of 34
Yes, I agree that policies must be clearly outlined at the beginning. One of the important factors discussed by Charles Durrett in his books on cohousing is group dynamics and communication. He recommends that the group who is contemplating cohousing attend workshops (can be via internet conferences on Skype or Zoom) to address this aspect. Organization and communication or lack thereof can make or break the venture.
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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 22 of 34

"...Co-housing isn't for everone, but it's a viable option for many, and worth a look. If you'd like to find out more AARP has several good introductory articles....".

 

To me, the idea is creative and sound. But everything has to be in the legal details. How are expenses divided, especially the rent cost? What happens if someone wants out of the arrangement, or has to leave?  What happens if someone has friends/family over and things get damaged? Pets? Pet damage?

   As long as there are some very specific, and enforceable rules, this could work. But all it takes is one 'so-and-so' to ruin the arrangement, and you end up with bad feelings all around.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 23 of 34

I'd consider cohousing if it was a situation that had separate living but in a shared community, or perhaps a duplex.  I'm picky about everything - decor, pets (I have large dogs), smells, habits - and don't want to change the way I do things, nor do I want to accommodate anyone else's habits.  So, close neighbors with shared activities (gym, club house, etc.) but I don't care to share living accommodations with anyone. 

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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 24 of 34

Yes, p473323p. I certainly agree about the kitchen use. That's why a community house with full kitchen for shared meals AND private cottages with kitchenettes for those times you don't feel like joining in the community meal both  important features.

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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 25 of 34

Yes it's something I'd do. The article is about one way to do it, but that's only for people who have enough money to build & manage a house. I would be really interested in co-housing as long as everyone gets enough privacy. I'd like to be living like that now, but, it has to be a large enough place. One kitchen can make things hard but if you have a schedule where cooking is done in shifts & the kitchen is large enough for everyones items. As long as there are rules that are discussed when written & weekly, or so, meetings then it will work. I've had many roommates in my life & when things are too casual problems can occur. 

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Adult Cohousing forming in Guanjuato, Mexico

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Message 26 of 34

Hi, everyone.  I've lived and worked in the city of Guanajuato, Mexico 20 years, and am about to retire from my university position.  Have a large 3bed/2/bath home on a ridgetop ecological zone eucalyptus forest overlooking the city, about 20 minutes from the city center.  The house built on all one level and wheelchair accessible inside and out. Looking for adults ages 30-70 interested in forming a small (10-14 person) cohousing group. The house would be converted to community use, and members would each build their own cottage/duplex near the house.  Cohousing provides the advantages of community interaction and support along with the necessary elements of privacy and independence. Members themselves manage the community and make all decisions democratically with respect to policies, finances, maintenance, daily living.  

The buildings and land will be transferred as assets to a non-profit corporation and members will be the shareholders of the entirety.  COSTS OF BUILDING AND LIVING EXPENSES ARE CONSIDERABLY LESS THAN IN THE U.S..  If you're interested, please write to me: sisteregg@yahoo.com   I would be happy to discuss detailsterrace view.jpgview from front terrace and send more pictures, lot diagrams, proposed cottage designs, lists of features.  Thanks!

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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 27 of 34
It sure does. Splitting expenses 3 ways will make retirement funds go a long way.
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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 28 of 34

I think it's a great idea.  Several years ago my friend and I lived in California.  Her husband had passed away and she lived with her mother.  I had a roommate at the time but that was not working out too good.  Anyway she had a home in Texas that her son and his family live in.  There is also a second small apartment on the same property.  So she suggested that when we retire it would be nice to share the apartment so neither one of us would have to be alone.  She moved here to Texas and worked on getting the apartment expanded and fixed up.  I ended up having to take early retirement at 62 so I also moved here.  That was seven years ago and we now share the apartment and most importantly the expenses.  Her son lives right next door so she gets to watch her grandkids growing up and so do I.  It probably is not for everyone because it does require a lot of patiences and compromise.  But it is working so far for us.  We each have our own room with our computer and TV so we don't argue over who wants to watch what.  Not being a great cook myself, she does most of the cooking while I help with the prep and do the dishes afterwards.  I do bake a lot in the winter which she does not like to do.  So it helps having offsetting skills.  Knowing what I am good at and knowing what she is good at helps a great deal.   It can work if people are willing to give it a try.

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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 29 of 34

Could also look at next gen homes. 

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Re: Senior Co-Housing

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Message 30 of 34

I have 20 years of expereince in co-housing. I took care of my parents for that length of time. If your house is set up, where everyone can have their own space to retreat to, it is vialbe solution. It is a support to both families. Kitchen can be a challenge, because, everyone has their set ways about cooking and cleaning. It has to be teamwork, not only for the senior, but for the caretaker. Otherwise resentment can start, which brings problems. Plus it keeps the senior active and gives them selfworth. If there is illness, it is easier on the caretaker, to give assistance with the senior being close. So many people cannot afford assisted living, which is upward of 5-6 thousand dollars a month. Plus even if they say the living conditions are great, most of the time they are not. I had to put my Mom in an assisted home for the last year of her life. It had become difficult to take care of her with the physical needs and health issues. I was always having meetings with management about my Mother's care. It was a nightmare. With cost and economic issues co-housing a great way to go.

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