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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 11 of 64

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Penguins (order Sphenisciformesfamily Spheniscidae) are a group of aquatic flightless birds. They live almost exclusively in the Southern Hemisphere, with only one species, the Galapagos penguin, found north of the equator. Highly adapted for life in the water, penguins have countershaded dark and white plumage, and their wings have evolved into flippers. Most penguins feed on krillfishsquid and other forms of sea life which they catch while swimming underwater. They spend roughly half of their lives on land and the other half in the sea.

Although almost all penguin species are native to the Southern Hemisphere, they are not found only in cold climates, such as Antarctica. In fact, only a few species of penguin live so far south. Several species are found in the temperate zone, and one species, the Galápagos penguin, lives near the equator.

The largest living species is the emperor penguin(Aptenodytes forsteri):[1] on average, adults are about 1.1 m (3 ft 7 in) tall and weigh 35 kg (77 lb). The smallest penguin species is the little blue penguin (Eudyptula minor), also known as the fairy penguin, which stands around 40 cm (16 in) tall and weighs 1 kg (2.2 lb). Among extant penguins, larger penguins inhabit colder regions, while smaller penguins are generally found in temperate or even tropical climates (see also Bergmann's rule). Some prehistoric species attained enormous sizes, becoming as tall or as heavy as an adult human. These were not restricted to Antarctic regions; on the contrary, subantarcticregions harboured high diversity, and at least one giant penguin occurred in a region around 2,000 km south of the equator 35 mya, in a climate decidedly warmer than today.

1280px-Antarctic_adelie_penguins_(js)_21.jpg1280px-Falkland_Islands_Penguins_88.jpgYellow-eyed_Penguin_MC.jpgSnaresPenguin_(Mattern)_large.jpg1280px-Penguins_walking_-Moltke_Harbour,_South_Georgia,_British_overseas_territory,_UK-8.jpg1280px-135_-_Cap_Virgenes_-_Manchot_de_Magellan_-_Janvier_2010.jpegSouth_Shetland-2016-Deception_Island–Chinstrap_penguin_(Pygoscelis_antarctica)_04.jpg

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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 12 of 64
WHATEVER HE/SHE IS- BEAUTIFUL!
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 13 of 64
OR VERY EXPENSIVE DESIGNER SHOES!
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 14 of 64
A BEAUTIFUL CRITTER - SO GLAD TO SHARE THIS PLANET WITH THIS & OTHER AMAZING LIFE FORMS.
SUPERGIRL, NO REALLY I MEAN IT! HER REAL NAME & MINE ARE THE SAME( FIRST 2 NAMES ARE)
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Message 15 of 64

Image result for shoebill stork pictures

These are Shoebill Storks The shoebill is a tall bird, with a typical height range of 110 to 140 cm (43 to 55 in) and some specimens reaching as much as 152 cm (60 in). Length from tail to beak can range from 100 to 140 cm (39 to 55 in) and wingspan is 230 to 260 cm (7 ft 7 in to 8 ft 6 in).  The shoebill (Balaeniceps rex) also known as whaleheadwhale-headed stork, or shoe-billed stork, is a very large stork-like bird. It derives its name from its enormous shoe-shaped bill. It has a somewhat stork-like overall form and has previously been classified with the storks. However, genetic evidence places it with the Pelecaniformes. The adult is mainly grey while the juveniles are browner. It lives in tropical east Africa in large swamps from Sudan to Zambia.

 

Please check out the video below of a Shoebill Stork with his handler:

https://hayhogi.vn/?qa=5070dce0330ace31/shoebill-stork-greeting-its-handler

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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 16 of 64

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I love this little fella's feet!  But they just don't look like they go with the rest of him.  Look's like he's wearin' a tuxedo with a pair of gym shoes. lol 

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Message 17 of 64

 

Glossy of bird terms
External anatomy (topography) of a typical bird: 1 beak, 2 head, 3 iris, 4 pupil, 5 mantle, 6 lesser coverts, 7 scapulars, 8 coverts, 9 tertials, 10 rump, 11 primaries, 12 vent, 13 thigh, 14 tibio-tarsal articulation, 15 tarsus, 16 feet, 17 tibia, 18 belly, 19 flanks, 20 breast, 21 throat, 22 chin, 23 eyestripe

The following is a glossary of common English language terms used in the description of birds—warm-blooded vertebrates of the class Aves, characterized by feathers, the ability to fly in all but the approximately 60 extant species of flightless birds, toothless, beaked jaws, the laying of hard-shelled eggs, a high metabolic rate, a four-chambered heart and a strong yet lightweight skeleton.

Among other details such as size, proportions and shape, terms defining bird features developed and are used to describe features unique to the class—especially evolutionary adaptations that developed to aid flight. There are, for example, numerous terms describing the complex structural makeup of feathers (e.g., barbules, rachides and vanes); types of feathers (e.g., filoplume, pennaceous and plumulaceous feathers); and their growth and loss (e.g., colour morph, nuptial plumage and pterylosis).

There are thousands of terms that are unique to the study of birds. This glossary makes no attempt to cover them all, concentrating on terms that might be found across descriptions of multiple bird species by bird enthusiasts and ornithologists. Though words that are not unique to birds are also covered, such as "back" or "belly", they are defined in relation to other unique features of external bird anatomy, sometimes called "topography". As a rule, this glossary does not contain individual entries on any of the approximately 9,700 recognized living individual bird species of the world.

 

Link: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Glossary_of_bird_terms

 

 

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I'm not a chicken!!

 

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Message 18 of 64

The brahminy kite (Haliastur indus), also known as the red-backed sea-eagle in Australia, is a medium-sized bird of prey in the family Accipitridae, which also includes many other diurnal raptors, such as eaglesbuzzards, and harriers. They are found in the Indian subcontinentSoutheast Asia, and Australia. They are found mainly on the coast and in inland wetlands, where they feed on dead fish and other prey. Adults have a reddish-brown body plumage contrasting with their white head and breast which make them easy to distinguish from other birds of prey.

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1280px-Brahmini_Kite_(Juvenile).jpg1280px-Brahminy_kite.jpg1280px-Brahminy_kite_young (1).jpg

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Re: NEW TOPIC: "FOR THE BIRDS"!

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Message 19 of 64

Dance with me Matilda!

Link:!

https://www.facebook.com/498491857181996/posts/894428627588315/

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Message 20 of 64

Could these seven reasons make you love seagulls?

Chip thieves. Noisy chip thieves. Noisy chip-stealing winged evil. Seagulls don’t have the best reputation. Seen by many as a blight wherever they’re found, they’d probably make a lot of people’s top ten things they could do without. However, they do have their fans. There is, after all, the Mobile Gull Appreciation Unit, a kitsch coastal treasure that celebrates all things gull. In an attempt to balance the scales against that one time a gull stole your lunch, here are seven reasons why seagulls are actually not all that bad. 
Mark Dion, Mobile Gull Appreciation Unit, commissioned by the Creative Foundation for Folkestone Triennial 2008.
 

1. They keep rats at bay

If it weren’t for gulls eating our waste, we’d probably have a lot more rats and rodents.

2. They provide a soundtrack to our memories

Even if their bolshiness isn’t appreciated, many people still love the sound of gulls at the seaside. Think of the herring gulls calling over the crashing waves in the Desert Island Discs signature tune.

3. They are highly adaptable

Gulls are masters of adaptability: that is why they have colonised our cities so successfully while struggling at the coast.

Where their natural habitat has declined and food has diminished, seagulls are suffering. However those gulls which have migrated to cities, which provide safety as well as an abundance of food, have managed to thrive.

Gulls are the kickass entrepreneurs of the avian world.

Brett Westwood follows gulls away from the sea and explores how they thrive in cities and at the landfill sites where birders gather to watch and ring them.

4. They have admirable traits

Even though gulls display many emotions which we would see as positives in a person (competitive spirit, willing to seize an opportunity), we disparage them for these traits. While it’s never a pleasant experience to have your lunch dive-bombed, maybe we should look at it from their point of view.

5. Spot the difference

Gull species are extremely complicated to tell apart and mastering it is the bird-watching equivalent of being able to distinguish fine wines.

6. They are more sinned against than sinning

In a study of human/gull interactions, it was found that a human was far less likely to be "attacked" – ie chip stealing – by a gull than a gull was to be attacked by a human. One man in Bath was regularly seen standing naked on his balcony swinging a samurai sword to deter gulls from nesting near his flat – a technique researchers said would probably work in the short term but is legally dubious having in mind the indecent exposure; and, of course, the fact that nesting gulls are protected by law. Not many people know that...

7. Yes, they can actually be cuddly

Gull imagery is also commonly used in sports: teams such as Torquay United and Brighton & Hove Albion have them as mascots (Gilbert the Gull and Gully the Seagull, respectively). Others including Blackpool Seagulls and the Helsinki Seagulls name entire teams after them.

 

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Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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