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Re: Coffee !

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Re: Coffee!

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LOL... I had a smaller version for home.  Gosh, I loved it!


@DaveMcK wrote:

Did you have a coffee maker like this where you worked? I did!

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Re: Coffee!

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Dave,

We had them, when the new administration building was finally finished for The Arc of Monmouth. This was the same time, 4 additional group homes where opened. Each resident home had them also, in the staff room. Used daily. Needed daily

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Coffee!

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Did you have a coffee maker like this where you worked? I did!

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Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Re: Coffe!

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To answer  your question, Dave, I made my coffee fresh with a lotta Coffemate and Truvia.  So it was very hot, carmel-colored, and super sweet.  Thanks for asking.

Lydia

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Coffe!

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How are we making our coffee today?

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Re: Re:Coffee !

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@DaveMcK wrote:

@L42010 

All Veterans will have positive stories of females contributions to wars efforts over America's history. Today they are Pilots, Officers and Enlisted service members. As a Cold War Veteran I saw them active in noncombat positions. For my Vietnam brothers their present in country is well documented. Majority of the American women that served in Vietnam were trained, graduate nurses. Most were fresh out of college and had volunteered their service, while other, more experienced nurses were sent to Vietnam to assist in training many South Vietnamese women. The first group of the Army Nurse Corps arrived in Vietnam in 1956, and by 1973 nearly 7500 American women would be serving in Vietnam. Only eight of them died during the conflict, two of which were posthumously awarded bravery medallions – Lieutenant Colonel Annie Ruth Graham had previously served in World War II and the Korea War while First Lieutenant Sharon Lane had previously served in Korea. Graham died in 1968 after suffering a stroke, and Lane died shortly after from injuries sustained after an attack on the hospital where she had been stationed.[9] Lane was later also awarded a posthumous Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm and the Vietnamese Bronze Star for Heroism.

 

Women's memorial in DC.Women's memorial in DC.WAF-Vietnam.png


++++++++++++++++++++++++++++

Thanks Dave for remembering and acknowledging.

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Re: Re:Coffee !

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@L42010 

All Veterans will have positive stories of females contributions to wars efforts over America's history. Today they are Pilots, Officers and Enlisted service members. As a Cold War Veteran I saw them active in noncombat positions. For my Vietnam brothers their present in country is well documented. Majority of the American women that served in Vietnam were trained, graduate nurses. Most were fresh out of college and had volunteered their service, while other, more experienced nurses were sent to Vietnam to assist in training many South Vietnamese women. The first group of the Army Nurse Corps arrived in Vietnam in 1956, and by 1973 nearly 7500 American women would be serving in Vietnam. Only eight of them died during the conflict, two of which were posthumously awarded bravery medallions – Lieutenant Colonel Annie Ruth Graham had previously served in World War II and the Korea War while First Lieutenant Sharon Lane had previously served in Korea. Graham died in 1968 after suffering a stroke, and Lane died shortly after from injuries sustained after an attack on the hospital where she had been stationed.[9] Lane was later also awarded a posthumous Vietnamese Gallantry Cross with Palm and the Vietnamese Bronze Star for Heroism.

 

Women's memorial in DC.Women's memorial in DC.WAF-Vietnam.png

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Huh, guess women did something right at some point in history. Smiley HappySmiley LOL


@DaveMcK wrote:
A brief history of coffee in the US military
 

Americans throwing tea in Boston Harbor was the start of our national movement toward the dark and bitter nectar of the gods. This is why tea time is gone and why we Americans take coffee breaks now.

Coffee houses were the center of political discussion during the American Revolution. These days, few things are as inextricably linked with the United States and its military as coffee.

 
The Women Who Fried Donuts and Dodged Bombs on the Front Lines of WWI Even if they had to use shell casings as rolling pins, the donuts still got made

image: https://thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com/VHXPcplmBZd_yhvFeSHoGOvCXIw=/800x600/filters:no_upscale()/https://pub...

donut girl 2.jpgWomen of the Salvation Army relied on ingenuity to serve up thousands of donuts to WWI soldiers. (Courtesy of Salvation Army)
SMITHSONIAN.COM 
APRIL 12, 2017

When women of Salvation Army volunteered to join the front lines of World War I to support the American Expeditionary Force, they were given a few obvious supplies: gas masks, helmets and .45-caliber revolvers. But it turned out what they needed most were things much harder for the Army to supply: rolling pins, cookie cutters, flour and sugar.


Read more: https://www.smithsonianmag.com/history/donut-girls-wwi-helped-fill-soldiers-bellies-and-get-women-vo...
Give the gift of Smithsonian magazine for only $12! http://bit.ly/1cGUiGv
Follow us: @SmithsonianMag on Twitter

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Re:Coffee !

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A brief history of coffee in the US military
 

Americans throwing tea in Boston Harbor was the start of our national movement toward the dark and bitter nectar of the gods. This is why tea time is gone and why we Americans take coffee breaks now.

Coffee houses were the center of political discussion during the American Revolution. These days, few things are as inextricably linked with the United States and its military as coffee.

The Women Who Fried Donuts and Dodged Bombs on the Front Lines of WWI Even if they had to use shell casings as rolling pins, the donuts still got made

image: https://thumbs-prod.si-cdn.com/VHXPcplmBZd_yhvFeSHoGOvCXIw=/800x600/filters:no_upscale()/https://pub...

donut girl 2.jpgWomen of the Salvation Army relied on ingenuity to serve up thousands of donuts to WWI soldiers. (Courtesy of Salvation Army)
SMITHSONIAN.COM 
APRIL 12, 2017
 

When women of Salvation Army volunteered to join the front lines of World War I to support the American Expeditionary Force, they were given a few obvious supplies: gas masks, helmets and .45-caliber revolvers. But it turned out what they needed most were things much harder for the Army to supply: rolling pins, cookie cutters, flour and sugr.

 

980x (3).jpg980x (2).jpg980x (1).jpg980x.jpg980x (4).jpg

Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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