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Frequent Social Butterfly
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Re: Emotional Health

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Message 1 of 26

I agree that physical activity and a spiritual committment helps with emotional health. I also agree that PTSD has a profound impact that poses challenges. 

 

An overlooked environmental impact on emotional health is the subtle impact of environmental poisons on the mind. Whether in water, food, air or medicine, even small amounts of poisons disrupt hormones and provoke adrenaline surges and/or depression. 

 

Two of the more ubiquitous poisons that have these impact are fluoridation chemicals added to water and electromagnetic radiation from current wireless technology. Both affect everyone, although they affect some individuals and susceptible populations more than others. In a nutshell: 

 

  • Fluoridation chemicals are always contaminated with aluminum, lead and other toxins. Fluoride is a 'neurotoxicant' in its own right, but also combines with other metals in the water and easily passes into the brain (as well as other body tissue including bone) where it is retained. It disrupts thyroid function and can cause sleeplessnes which affect emotional health. Kidney disease and inflammatory diseases are also caused or worsened by fluoridation, again with some populations being more susceptible than others. My experience was decades of gastrointestinal problems & arthritis ended in less than two weeks of assidious avoidance of fluoride - a definite mood boost. Filters are generally ineffective. 
    • “The silicofluorides commonly used in artificial water fluoridation also leach metals out of plumbing, fixtures and cookware, especially when used in conjunction with chemical disinfectants and water softening agents… From the point of view of peace- building and recovery operations, it is important to realize that heavy-metal toxicity causes dysfunction in the parts of the brain that mediate inhibition, reasoning, judgment, and impulse control, making individuals or groups of individuals prone to violent outbursts.”  - in “Environmental Considerations for Building Peace.” Ann Livingstone, editor Kristine St-Pierre, managing editor.  Pearson Papers, Volume 12, 2009. pp. 36, 38.

 

  • Electromagnetic frequencies & radiation is the 'fastest growing air pollution on Earth'  and an extinction threat to plants, animals and people according to EMF scientists. The US Dept. of Interior wrote NTIA in February 2014 about the observed damage to wildlife and plants in the vicinity of wireless base stations. Damage has been documented 6 miles from towers emitting EMF. Symptoms of electromagnetic sensitivity include adrenaline spikes, hormone disruption, anxiety, sleeplessness and cardiac irregularities. Utilities are replacing meters with 'smart meters' which have caused illness in many. Most don't know they have them and just seek treatment for symptoms. My cardiac problems began and ended with the  smart meter on my house. 

 

Seniors need to be politically outspoken on these environmental poisons that are contributing to depression and illness. Don't accept the false dilmma of they are necessary for various benefits.

  1. Brush your teeth and watch your diet to protect your teeth from cavities.
  2. Develop safer wireless technology and implement regulations that reduce exposure to EM radiation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Re: Emotional Health

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Message 2 of 26

@ip3285 Best wishes for your search! Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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@Epster  I've seen recumbent bikes up here on the mountain, and they don't look like something I'd like.  I really want to find a 2 wheeler with motor that will fit a short 4'10" person, that I can ride as a regular pedal bike and then turn on the power when climbing a steep hill.  I'll keep looking.  When I find it, you'll hear me yell "yippee" all the way from so. CA to CO.  By the way, I don't have to shovel the chicken coop in snow because this is like the desert, so it broils and boils, but never snows!  

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Message 4 of 26

@ip3285 I forgot to mention: the fellow --a highly decorated triathlete-- in the first trike is a pretty small man: maybe 5'6" and 143 pounds. That's a Greenspeed brand trike he's on. The next fellow in line is a bit larger at 153 pounds and 5'7", but the brand of trike he's riding also makes one called a Pocket which is for smaller people. Recumbent trikes have an adjustable boom, so each model is actually adaptable in terms of length. I'm 5'9" and ride the same model as the 5'7" guy even though his height is in his torso and mine is in my legs.

 

FWIW and all. Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Message 5 of 26

4 trikes at NE starting line.jpgRecumbent Trikes at 2017 NE games

 

4 trikes NE starting line from rear.jpgRecumbent Trikes at 2017 NE games

 

@ip3285 These are recumbent trikes. They have a low center of gravity, thus are more stable than upright trikes. Also, because of the low center of gravity, they are super fun, as they corner well and ride like a dream. At the speeds we racers attain --no, I'm not suggesting you speed in one Smiley Happy-- they feel more like a race car than a bike. We bought ours thinking ahead to a time 25 or so years in the future when we wouldn't be driving but might still be able to ride to the grocery store. We figured these would be our 'cars'. Then we started racing. Smiley Happy

 

Anyway, this is what I was thinking about earlier when I suggested a trike. Although an upright might also work for you.

 

And yes; absolutely! I consider shoveling out the farm after a snow to be excellent exercise. Smiley Happy (Sometimes wood hauling is considered exercise around here: 8 or so large arm loads up 2 flights of stairs can get my heart pumping! Smiley Happy)

 

Be well!

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Message 6 of 26
@Epster. I've never been on a trike since maybe when I was a child and I don't even remember having one then. I rode a motorcycle for about 30 years and recently gave up my license and sold my bike years ago, so I need a "reasonable substitute", which will be a motorized 2 wheel bike. Now if I can find one small enough to fit, that's the problem. I might have to get a kit. The owner of the bike shop in town will do it for me. Your idea of switching your exercise is good. When it warms up a bit I'll be swimming again, and of course I run and walk. I wonder if shoveling the chicken and goat enclosures count as exercise?
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Message 7 of 26

@ip3285  Yes, I think it helps to switch up the exercise routine. I get different types of conditioning out of the various activities, of course, but also find it more fun to walk one day, bike another and do resistance training othe days. More fun=happiness. Smiley Happy

 

Maybe you can find a motorized trike, or perhaps get a motor kit or wheel for a regular trike. I find trikes to be farm more comfortable than bikes, anyway.

 

Best wishes.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Message 8 of 26
@Epster: That's a sign of a true athlete and persevering person when you can be sick and still continue to exercise. I hope you feel better soon.
I need to find a bicycle that has a lithium motor for when I want to go up a steep hill and don't have enough strength to do it. I've shrunk and no longer fit on a women's 26" bike, so I need a 24" that I can peddle and then turn on the engine when needed. I saw them at Costco for $2400 (eek) - not on a retiree's budget. I need to bike as well as run, just like you bike and do other things. I think older adults need to "mix it up" to get all round exercise and not get bored.
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Message 9 of 26

@ip3285wrote:

I've been running for 37 years.  Now, at age 78, I can't do long runs like I did several years ago, but even a short run still makes me feel great.  It seems that as soon as my running shoes hit the road I leave stress behind me.    


Hi @ip3285  (It seems to me that I missed answering you on some or the other thread. Sorry. I've been swamped and am now recovering from an acute case of sinusitis.)

 

Anyway: yes! Agreed! Even while I've been suffering with this stuffy head I've been getting in 2-4 miles walks and short mini-trampoline sessions along with floor exercises. They have helped me feel better in the midst of feeling awful. (Truth.)

 

When I'm not congested, a quick all-out bike ride will help clear my head, get my body humming and serves to return me to my desk in warrior mode. 

 

May your running habits continue to serve you well. Smiley Happy

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Message 10 of 26

@vjklanderwrote:

Actually, I've found a strong sense of personal responsibility works for everyone, regardless if they follow any religion or not.


@vjklander  I have to agree with this. Without that solid sense of personal responsibility, there really is no cornerstone. 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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