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Emotional Health

We need to talk more about Emotional Health

 

When we are happy,our body works better

 

Regular Physical Activity,helps us deal with depression

 

Just using the AARP website helps us communicate with others

Sharing our knowledge and beliefs

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Yes running and walking help in our brain functioning. Apart from this omega supplements are the best way to get a healthy lifestyle. Visit https://www.omegabrite.com/

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Emotional Health is extremely important.
Good support group of friends, good positive outlook, exploring our spiritual path and having a purpose is critical.
But even as emotional humans, our bodies are chemical in nature, and we must make sure that we are taking supplements and eating right.
One of the most amazing doctors that figured out the connection of supplements and emotional/mental well being was Dr. Abram Hoffer. Cured thousands of patients of bipolar disorder, schizophrenia and depression.
How, he used supplements.
His main tools : Vitamin B3(Niacin) and Vitamin C.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=G0xPa0qVvl4

I take Vitamin B3 niacin ( or Niacinamide version also) twice a day, as well as vitamin c, and( of course prayer) I credit it to really keeping out of emotional lows.
Cheapest place I found was here: https://www.nutricelebrity.com/now-foods-niacinamide-500-mg-100-capsules

We are all emotional beings, that need love and feel connected and part of something.
Conversationalist

I agree that physical activity and a spiritual committment helps with emotional health. I also agree that PTSD has a profound impact that poses challenges. 

 

An overlooked environmental impact on emotional health is the subtle impact of environmental poisons on the mind. Whether in water, food, air or medicine, even small amounts of poisons disrupt hormones and provoke adrenaline surges and/or depression. 

 

Two of the more ubiquitous poisons that have these impact are fluoridation chemicals added to water and electromagnetic radiation from current wireless technology. Both affect everyone, although they affect some individuals and susceptible populations more than others. In a nutshell: 

 

  • Fluoridation chemicals are always contaminated with aluminum, lead and other toxins. Fluoride is a 'neurotoxicant' in its own right, but also combines with other metals in the water and easily passes into the brain (as well as other body tissue including bone) where it is retained. It disrupts thyroid function and can cause sleeplessnes which affect emotional health. Kidney disease and inflammatory diseases are also caused or worsened by fluoridation, again with some populations being more susceptible than others. My experience was decades of gastrointestinal problems & arthritis ended in less than two weeks of assidious avoidance of fluoride - a definite mood boost. Filters are generally ineffective. 
    • “The silicofluorides commonly used in artificial water fluoridation also leach metals out of plumbing, fixtures and cookware, especially when used in conjunction with chemical disinfectants and water softening agents… From the point of view of peace- building and recovery operations, it is important to realize that heavy-metal toxicity causes dysfunction in the parts of the brain that mediate inhibition, reasoning, judgment, and impulse control, making individuals or groups of individuals prone to violent outbursts.”  - in “Environmental Considerations for Building Peace.” Ann Livingstone, editor Kristine St-Pierre, managing editor.  Pearson Papers, Volume 12, 2009. pp. 36, 38.

 

  • Electromagnetic frequencies & radiation is the 'fastest growing air pollution on Earth'  and an extinction threat to plants, animals and people according to EMF scientists. The US Dept. of Interior wrote NTIA in February 2014 about the observed damage to wildlife and plants in the vicinity of wireless base stations. Damage has been documented 6 miles from towers emitting EMF. Symptoms of electromagnetic sensitivity include adrenaline spikes, hormone disruption, anxiety, sleeplessness and cardiac irregularities. Utilities are replacing meters with 'smart meters' which have caused illness in many. Most don't know they have them and just seek treatment for symptoms. My cardiac problems began and ended with the  smart meter on my house. 

 

Seniors need to be politically outspoken on these environmental poisons that are contributing to depression and illness. Don't accept the false dilmma of they are necessary for various benefits.

  1. Brush your teeth and watch your diet to protect your teeth from cavities.
  2. Develop safer wireless technology and implement regulations that reduce exposure to EM radiation. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Bronze Conversationalist

@Epster  I've seen recumbent bikes up here on the mountain, and they don't look like something I'd like.  I really want to find a 2 wheeler with motor that will fit a short 4'10" person, that I can ride as a regular pedal bike and then turn on the power when climbing a steep hill.  I'll keep looking.  When I find it, you'll hear me yell "yippee" all the way from so. CA to CO.  By the way, I don't have to shovel the chicken coop in snow because this is like the desert, so it broils and boils, but never snows!  

Honored Social Butterfly

@ip3285 Best wishes for your search! 🙂

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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I've been running for 37 years.  Now, at age 78, I can't do long runs like I did several years ago, but even a short run still makes me feel great.  It seems that as soon as my running shoes hit the road I leave stress behind me.    

Honored Social Butterfly


@ip3285wrote:

I've been running for 37 years.  Now, at age 78, I can't do long runs like I did several years ago, but even a short run still makes me feel great.  It seems that as soon as my running shoes hit the road I leave stress behind me.    


Hi @ip3285  (It seems to me that I missed answering you on some or the other thread. Sorry. I've been swamped and am now recovering from an acute case of sinusitis.)

 

Anyway: yes! Agreed! Even while I've been suffering with this stuffy head I've been getting in 2-4 miles walks and short mini-trampoline sessions along with floor exercises. They have helped me feel better in the midst of feeling awful. (Truth.)

 

When I'm not congested, a quick all-out bike ride will help clear my head, get my body humming and serves to return me to my desk in warrior mode. 

 

May your running habits continue to serve you well. 🙂

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Bronze Conversationalist

@Epster: That's a sign of a true athlete and persevering person when you can be sick and still continue to exercise. I hope you feel better soon.
I need to find a bicycle that has a lithium motor for when I want to go up a steep hill and don't have enough strength to do it. I've shrunk and no longer fit on a women's 26" bike, so I need a 24" that I can peddle and then turn on the engine when needed. I saw them at Costco for $2400 (eek) - not on a retiree's budget. I need to bike as well as run, just like you bike and do other things. I think older adults need to "mix it up" to get all round exercise and not get bored.
Honored Social Butterfly

@ip3285  Yes, I think it helps to switch up the exercise routine. I get different types of conditioning out of the various activities, of course, but also find it more fun to walk one day, bike another and do resistance training othe days. More fun=happiness. 🙂

 

Maybe you can find a motorized trike, or perhaps get a motor kit or wheel for a regular trike. I find trikes to be farm more comfortable than bikes, anyway.

 

Best wishes.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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@Epster. I've never been on a trike since maybe when I was a child and I don't even remember having one then. I rode a motorcycle for about 30 years and recently gave up my license and sold my bike years ago, so I need a "reasonable substitute", which will be a motorized 2 wheel bike. Now if I can find one small enough to fit, that's the problem. I might have to get a kit. The owner of the bike shop in town will do it for me. Your idea of switching your exercise is good. When it warms up a bit I'll be swimming again, and of course I run and walk. I wonder if shoveling the chicken and goat enclosures count as exercise?
Honored Social Butterfly

Recumbent Trikes at 2017 NE gamesRecumbent Trikes at 2017 NE games

 

Recumbent Trikes at 2017 NE gamesRecumbent Trikes at 2017 NE games

 

@ip3285 These are recumbent trikes. They have a low center of gravity, thus are more stable than upright trikes. Also, because of the low center of gravity, they are super fun, as they corner well and ride like a dream. At the speeds we racers attain --no, I'm not suggesting you speed in one :)-- they feel more like a race car than a bike. We bought ours thinking ahead to a time 25 or so years in the future when we wouldn't be driving but might still be able to ride to the grocery store. We figured these would be our 'cars'. Then we started racing. 🙂

 

Anyway, this is what I was thinking about earlier when I suggested a trike. Although an upright might also work for you.

 

And yes; absolutely! I consider shoveling out the farm after a snow to be excellent exercise. 🙂 (Sometimes wood hauling is considered exercise around here: 8 or so large arm loads up 2 flights of stairs can get my heart pumping! :))

 

Be well!

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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@ip3285 I forgot to mention: the fellow --a highly decorated triathlete-- in the first trike is a pretty small man: maybe 5'6" and 143 pounds. That's a Greenspeed brand trike he's on. The next fellow in line is a bit larger at 153 pounds and 5'7", but the brand of trike he's riding also makes one called a Pocket which is for smaller people. Recumbent trikes have an adjustable boom, so each model is actually adaptable in terms of length. I'm 5'9" and ride the same model as the 5'7" guy even though his height is in his torso and mine is in my legs.

 

FWIW and all. 🙂

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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I have found that if a person allows Jesus to enter into their heart and they know they are only traveling through this earthly life for a short time, they can deal with anything that comes along. Eternity, in Heaven with Jesus, will not be so far away in compaarison to anytime that we spend here on earth.

Thank you Jesus for coming down here to show us how to join you later.

Also there isn't anything that can happen here on earth that compare to spending eternity without Jesus. Romans 10:9-10; John 10:27-30.

Regular Contributor

Actually, I've found a strong sense of personal responsibility works for everyone, regardless if they follow any religion or not.

Honored Social Butterfly


@vjklanderwrote:

Actually, I've found a strong sense of personal responsibility works for everyone, regardless if they follow any religion or not.


@vjklander  I have to agree with this. Without that solid sense of personal responsibility, there really is no cornerstone. 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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I agree with  most of the answers here. for myself, because I have medical issues ( i.e. leukemia, diabetes, Afib etc ) that can contribute to chemical imbalances/depression, as well as medications that do the same, I get a physical check up, complete with chemical blood work to find out if it is an additional /exsisting health issues or medication. If it is, I get it treated. I learned to "know" my body/moods, and what is "normal " for me. I also develop my faith in God, thru prayer, music  and scripture meditation. Walking helps relieve tension and I have a great support team in my pastor, his wife and close friends, to talk things over. As a result I seldon get depressed or a case of the blues... So I count my Blessings and keep on moving and growing.

Trusted Contributor

Walking is my exercise, and I also read, do puzzles, play games to keep my mind active. I try and read my bible often for strength and comfort in my daily life: My diet I am doing better. When you are 72 you

like a cake or pie some time, but I try to eat better every day. i can do every thing for my self to God be the praise and glory:

Periodic Contributor

I love reading the community blogs of what people are going through in their depression of life or mental health. For myself I have bipolar and PTSD from the military. And I am soon to be 65 years old and find that reading, taking walks with my dogs and exercises daily helps cope with everything. But also I put first God in everything I do.

.

Contributor

Thank you for your reply. My coping habits are similar. So knowing I'm on track is reassuring. Happy regards from Las Vegas Nevada. 

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I'm sort of retired from a successful career in banking. Retired to a horse farm with 17 horses (our own and boarders) that requires a fair amount of physical work. I'm the gury who fixes all the broken fences, equipment, etc. We do this because of the kids who come here to learn how to ride and care for the animals.

I also provide support systems to smaller financial institutions on managing compliance with existing and new regulatory requirements. If you want to see how well your brain is functioning read a Federal Regulation!

P.S. not into either of these for the money, but raither the satisfaction of giving, watching young people grow into responsible adults, the excersie and the mental stimulus.At 74 I feel pretty fullfilled. Life is good.

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So true!!
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Running and walking keeps my brain functioning.  Also, working on my farm, in my gardens, and tending to my goats, chickens and dogs.  There's a barn own in the barn owl box and we "exchange greetings" every morning, which gives me an emotional "high".  It's interesting how one part of the body can positively influence the other despite the fact that they perform different functions.

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It seems to me that when you start an exercise program,you are going to feel worse than before you started.If you continue,eventually you'll feel better than not exercising.Unfortunately,most people drop out  before they get to the point where they feel better exercising than not.It may take months or even years,before you get to that point.Anyway,that's what happened to me,when I began bicycling,back in 1978.After a few years I became addicted and have withdrawl symptoms if I don't ride.Have riden over 120K miles since starting.Averaging about 110 miles a week.Had the common inquinal hernia surgery and breaking collar bone in a bike crash,Other than those 2 events,I've managed to have only 1 doctor visit since the early 1970's.Now I'm 66 and still not signed up for Medicare,other than the free Part A.Will sign up for Parts D and B,when I take my SS at 70.Wish this country would concentrate on healty living,rather than insurance,to bail you  out of your bad behavior.So much wealth wasted on insurance and medical,that could be better used.

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I agree, exercise is the key.  It doesn't have to be a chore.  I play pickleball 3 or 4 times a week.  It's fun, good social activity.  You meet lots of people in a good social atmosphere.  Also, walking in nature is healthful and refreshing.

Trusted Contributor

There Are Always The Few The Proud Like The.US Marines

That makes the decisions and changes for any community

 

It is sad,but it is a True Part Of Life Since Civilization Began

 

Individuals like me and others has had life throw difficulties in our path and we  the Survivors enjoy life much more.

 

Bob

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@roberts258723 wrote:

There Are Always The Few The Proud Like The.US Marines

That makes the decisions and changes for any community

 

It is sad,but it is a True Part Of Life Since Civilization Began

 

Individuals like me and others has had life throw difficulties in our path and we  the Survivors enjoy life much more.

 

Bob


Truth and wisdom, Bob. 🙂

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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@roberts258723  Exercise is truly the key to health and happiness, isn't it?

 

Why we can know this, are shown this truth every day, and still have a population that is 70% overweight is mind boggling. 🙂 

 

No matter what you are talking about some people will get it and some people will not. If this sounds negative, I am sorry. It is just that since I arrived here I have basically been saying the same thing over and over again: exercise is the key to health and happiness. Those discussions consistently draw less interest than, say, a discussion of what we as individuals have collected over the years or chatter about the weather.

 

So, hey, I'm all ears, but you are preaching to the choir here. 🙂

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving