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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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@catwoman500 

 

Have one Nikon digital and have had for several years (2002-3) Coolpix.

 

But, sometimes you just want to exercise the old school 35mm or the old 120/220. Also Nikon And Nikkormat.

 

Hmm, wine now there’s an idea.

 

Froze

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 102 of 194

@Frozenoem ...Maybe it's the wine, but when I read your post I started to smile and thought of the song by Simon and Garfunkle:

"Makes you think all the world's a sunny day
I got a Nikon camera
I love to take a photograph.
So mama don't take my Kodachrome away."

I do have a Nikon, but it's a digital of course. Cat Wink N.

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 103 of 194

84* and sunny. A/C on.

 

House was cool until friend came in to clean the rugs. Might be time to turn temperature down on furnace 170* water, for best use in Winter, radiant floorboards.

 

Re: Monarch Butterflies and Bees both owe their demise to Roundup 

 

https://makewayformonarchs.org/i/archives/2682

 

Ah Roundup pesticide, safe according to T’s WH and EPA.

 

https://www.ewg.org/release/trump-epa-sides-bayermonsanto-over-science-claims-cancer-causing-weedkil...

 

So much for science, studies, research, etc. Show me the money instead and it’s safe enough to drink🤣. 

 

Comment above is purely my humble opinion.

 

*edit- at Camp Roundup and most pesticides are banned, in wildlife preserve. Have a picture floating around the house of dogwood tree covered in approx .  100 Monarchs from last year.😎 Tried to find it but, it’s on slide 35mm, my last roll of Kodachrome or Ektachrome.

 

And on that cheery note I need to set up someone’s home entertainment and bring it into the 21st Century with BLuetooth to a 1970-ish amplifier, they might be able to hear the TV and record from their iPads, streaming to 8track, reel to reels, etc.

 

Note: If anyone ever moves label both ends of cords, vs giving 200 patch cords etc to someone to hook everything up again.🤣And save those manuals.

 

Expect to be seeing patch cords in my sleep for days.

 

Enjoy

Froze

 

 

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 104 of 194

@n566192l, 3 monarchs!  Yes, rare sight these days.

 

Not too long ago, I was sitting on deck when a monarch started flitting around me, even alighted on my leg briefly!  I was enthralled, when out of the corner of my eye, I noticed I wasn't the only one watching the butterfly.  Indeed, 2 furkids were also fascinated.  Oh, heck no!  It must have made a ridiculous picture -- 2 cats chasing a butterfly and me chasing 2 cats -- but the monarch finally escaped unscathed, off to hopefully find some milkweed.



    

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 105 of 194

@n566192l ...I know I read about the reason for the decline in monarchs, but of course since I suffer from CRS Cat LOL, I had to look it up.

Tried to send a link, but the link doesn't work, so will try to coppy and paste here:

 

Dear EarthTalk: How are monarch butterflies doing today? They used to pass through my area in big numbers, but in the last few years there seem to be many fewer.—Bill Wright, Erie, Pa.

The monarch butterfly, royally adorned in black, white and reddish-orange and able to migrate as far as 2,800 miles, is a true wonder of nature. Each year monarchs travel from Canada and the U.S. to hibernate in the forests of central Mexico. But in recent years the monarchs have been in sharp population decline due to habitat loss, eradication of the plants it depends upon and other environmental factors.

The decline in monarchs has been going on for two decades, but the last few years have been particularly worrisome. Mexico’s National Commission of Natural Protected Areas reports a 59 percent decline in the area of forest there occupied by overwintering monarchs since December 2011. Meanwhile, the World Wildlife Fund (WWF) reports that overwintering populations along the California coast have shrunk from over a million individuals counted at 101 sites in 1997 to less than 60,000 at just 74 sites in 2009. The International Union for the Conservation of Nature, which maintains the “Red List” of endangered species around the world, recognizes the monarchs’ annual migration as an “endangered biological phenomenon.”

According to Monarch Watch, an educational outreach program based at the University of Kansas that engages citizen-scientists in monarch monitoring and conservation efforts, habitat destruction is one key driver in the monarch’s demise: “New roads, housing developments and agricultural expansion…all transform a natural landscape in ways that make it impossible for monarchs to live there.” Also, drought and record-high temperatures in North America in 2012 triggered an earlier-than-usual monarch migration. This disrupted the butterflies’ breeding cycle by drying out their eggs prematurely.

The hot weather has also reduced the nectar content of the milkweed plants that monarch larvae depend on. In addition, milkweed is becoming scarce due to farmers’ increasing reliance on herbicides. Most of the soy and corn crops grown in the U.S. are genetically engineered to resist herbicides. This means even more chemical spraying—and far fewer milkweed plants. Nectar producing plants that attract adult butterflies are facing a similar fate, further complicating survival for the monarch.

It won’t be easy to stem the tide of human development that threatens the species’ long term survival. In 2008 the Commission for Environmental Cooperation, set up under the North American Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA) to help the U.S., Canada and Mexico coordinate on environmental initiatives, published its North American Monarch Conservation Plan to establish a conservation blueprint for the butterflies. Key aspects of the plan include the creation of incentives for the conservation of overwintering sites and the restoration of breeding habitat throughout the butterfly’s extensive range.

In the meantime, the Mexican government has worked with WWF and other groups and made strides in restricting logging in areas critical to monarch populations. And in the U.S., monarch habitat restoration work in California and other parts of the U.S. have helped provide the butterflies some relief. Whether these and other efforts are enough to rescue the monarchs remains to be seen.

CONTACTS: WWF, www.worldwildlife.org; Monarch Watch, www.monarchwatch.org; Mexico’s National Commission of Natural Protected Areas, www.conanp.gob.mx.

EarthTalk® is written and edited by Roddy Scheer and Doug Moss and is a registered trademark of E - The Environmental Magazine (www.emagazine.com). Send questions to: earthtalk@emagazine.com. Subscribe: www.emagazine.com/subscribe. Free Trial Issue: www.emagazine.com/trial.

 

monarch butterfly.jpgMonarch

 

 

 

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Hello,

I just saw 3 monarch butterflies, on a flower or weed by my storage space. I haven't seen them in awhile.  Growing up in SeaGirt, New Jersey, I lived across from the National Gaurd Field. I used to see hundreds of Monarch butterflies are every year.  They are a rare sighting these days. Anyone know why

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 107 of 194

Greetings,

I am finally sending out more boxes on Monday. Frozenoem, just let me know if Chelli needs treats you too. Just packing them up today. I did find a box of orange vests for dogs. I only found size Large so far. Thanks everyone for your your posts about the orange vests. Brand is guardian gear. Stilling looking for more stuff. Donations came in while I was in the hospital. I did reach out to the rescue groups about the dry food. They where so happy. I have changed the drop off to the various groups. The groups are giving the new contract information . What a win win. Plus, the dog food companies are helping with a replacement generator that was destroyed by the storm in New Jersey. The Shelter, and rescues just do so much to help the animals. I am so happy.

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 108 of 194

And it’s 84* and sunny, we now return to your regularly scheduled programming.

 

Have been personally kicked off of easy PM’s for at least a week, on all devices. And I’m the guy still drawing pay for correcting these issues for others.

 

@MsStretch 

 

It’s on the list, and will make the done deeds, whether by foot or Segway to a point.

 

Frozen Rivers/creeks or boulders are no issue, have assortment of spikes devices on canes.

 

Still enjoy properly made cabins in the woods and want those photos.

 

Hope all enjoy the day, haven’t required A/C as yet, staying at 70* in house.

 

And was a beautiful 52* when I awoke, to birds and little blighters.

 

Froze

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 109 of 194

@Frozenoem wrote:

@MsStretch 

 

Compared to AT it looked like an ez trail 4’  (packed) vs shale and dirt 1’ foot wide AT trail.

 

Scary part looked like a tree trunk bridge (1 log wide) with a split rail handrailing over brook.

 

Which suggested late Autumn or Winter hike, frozen brooks are easier than non split tree trunks for crossings.

 

And that pesky snake issue, haven’t played with them in ages.

 

Froze

 


At least the bridge has a hand rail!

 

avent_footbridge_w.jpgBridge to Avant -- proceed with caution and hang on to the rail!

[Photo by Julie Dodd / Friends of the Smokies]

 

Lord knows I have crossed many a creek on a fallen log sans railing.  Trust me, the days of just blithely skipping across logs effortlessly are loooooong gone.  I use the skoosh method.  Straddle and skoosh (wriggle, crawl, cling tenaciously).

 

Frozen creeks are good, but beware icy boulders.

 

This seems to be a hidden treasure not all that far from main trail.  Definitely worth a look-see.  Fascinating history and background.

 

You must go for it, @Frozenoem .  I stuck it on my hiking to-do/bucket list for when I am in that area.

 



    

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Re: Morning Roll Call - July and August 2019

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Message 110 of 194

@MsStretch 

 

Compared to AT it looked like an ez trail 4’  (packed) vs shale and dirt 1’ foot wide AT trail.

 

Scary part looked like a tree trunk bridge (1 log wide) with a split rail handrailing over brook.

 

Which suggested late Autumn or Winter hike, frozen brooks are easier than non split tree trunks for crossings.

 

And that pesky snake issue, haven’t played with them in ages.

 

Froze

 

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