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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 261 of 593

I agree with that because the Plan G will continue to take on younger people.  With Plan F being closed to new people, it will mean that the average age of policy holders will continue to rise, therefore the premiums would likely rise faster.

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 262 of 593

I think that in Indiana the AARP/UH Plan G is community-rated. Therefore, theoretically, after the 12-year discount period ends (age 77), the premium should no longer increase (except for increses caused by the loss and risk experience of the Plan G community as a whole). This should be an advantage in the long run. Let me know if you disagree.

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 263 of 593

Actually, I don't think your comment that "supplemental is always community rated" is correct.  Maybe in your state it is?  I know that in California most supplemental policies are rated using age at issue or age attained.  AARP/UHC is one of the only companies that offer community rated policies (at least in my community in California).  Everyone should figure that the Part B Deductible will go up every year as well as the basic Medicare premium and the bump that higher-income people have to pay.  It's amazing to me the differnce in premium prices of the same Medigap Plans by geographic location. 

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 264 of 593
I have a Medicare Advantage plan which was Healthnet and then became Allwell. Under Healthnet there was Silver Sneakers per my agent. Under Allwell, they don't mention it. Our county, we only had once choice for a Medicare Advantage. This year we have a 2nd - Humana. You are correct - I compared plans and 3 of my 5 prescriptions weren't covered (as compared to the 1 out of 6 under Allwell), and my costs for various medical situations including copays, is higher. Overall, if I stay with my current plan as compared to Humana, I could join all 5 gyms in town. I do use an agent - when I first became eligible under disability, I thought I was confused when all I could find was one plan. Ends up I wasn't, but the agent is very good at comparing options and advising me of expected drugs costs for the year. The agent doesn't cost me anything, so it is still one thing under the medicare rules that benefits us.
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Re: Just a Caution about changing plans

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Message 265 of 593

In the county I live in, in Arizona, we only had one choice for a plan which was Healthnet now changed to Allwell. This year there is a 2nd option (Humana) but the costs for meds and other expenses, but especially prescriptions, would cost me more. So it is very important for those who have more options on plans to compare them carefully, byond the premiums. 

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 266 of 593

Thanks for some useful information. In Ohio my independent health advisory insurance company is suggesting Plan G over F as well. F will not be available to new applicants starting in 2020. They are saying G is the same as F except for the $183 deductable and is significantly cheaper. (I do wonder once F is gone how much the deductable will be raised...)Some of the You Tube videos are saying the same thing. One of them showed a graph of how F, G, and N go up as we age. F went up something like 9% and G and N went up 3.5%. I seriously don't know why this has to be so complicated! 

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 267 of 593

Supplemental is always community rated. AARP UHC begins at a discounted rate but as you pass 75 it really increases. It's will be $249 per month each stating in April 2019. It's currently $230 monthly. 

 

They can also deny you coverage based on health and the enrollment period does not apply to supplemental.  For instance, Humana will not cover my wife on any supplemental plan since she  previously had cancer. I'm 77 and my wife is 76 and we will begin Aetna plan G on 1/1/19 to avoid being charged the Part B deductable this year. The premiums are  considerably less than our AARP U HC. The Aetna plan is not a discounted rate.

 

My insurance agent informed me that plan G is cheaper because people have to pay the Part B deductable and won't go to a doctor everytime they have the sniffles.

 

As I previously stated, we're also changing from a AARP UHC Part D to a AARP UHC Medicare RX Walgreen plan which is $1,400 cheaper annually.

 

Total savings for us is a little more than $3,000 annually. 

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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 268 of 593

Thanks.  I'm asking because in California, the AARP/UHC Plan F is Community Rated, which I believe is an advantage as we get older (I don't know anything about other states).  Now, because Plan F will not be offered after 1/1/2020, I am thinking that since there will not be any more younger people going into that plan, the premiums may go up quicker as we age.  May be time to rethink and look at Plan G when I get to my Birthday month.  In CA, within 30 days of our Birthday, we can choose a different Medigap Plan with the same or lesser benefits without medical underwriting.  I'm not sure if they can rate you differently than others due to those pre-existing conditions though.  I'm assuming that the Plan G is also Community Rated but have not looked into that yet.  Just trying to think way ahead since I can't do anything during this open enrollment period without penalty for pre-existing conditions.  If I've stated anything materially incorrect, I'd appreciate any comments/corrections.

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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 269 of 593

@ChristineS148307

 

I just posted a Consumer Reports article on just this subject

https://community.aarp.org/t5/Medicare-Insurance/HOW-TO-CHOOSE-THE-BEST-MEDIGAP-PLAN-Consumer-Report...

 

and here are some examples from Medicare.gov

Medicare.gov - Cost of Medigap Policies

 

ALL of the plans increase with medical inflation - hard for an individual to have much control there - that's more of a government and industry issue.

 

Also, all states don't dictate that each of these methods have to be used within a state - they may only pick one or two rather than all three for the insurers to use.

 

Personally, I would determine which of these rating methods are available in my state.  

  • Community Rated will probably be the cheapest for the longterm because there would be a constant supply of new enrollees, especially now with the baby boomers coming on board, to help keep premiums lower.
  • Next would be issue-age rated, although it might be more expensive in the beginning, it should be a better value as age creeps up.
  • Last would be Attained age rated because it will creep up as you age - but is probably the cheapest in the beginning.  Over the long term, this is the most expensive because you are hit with not only medical inflation but with an increasing age rated premium.

Then determine what my expected (guess) longevity might be based on familiar traits and my general health and any adverse lifestyle choices.

 

Then pick from the state offerings which method is the most advantageous for you and compare those policies for the best rate.

 

You have to either consult your state Dept of Insurance or ask your Medicare insurance broker or agent which method is being used for different insurers.  I looked up Wisconsin Dept of Insurance - Medigap and they had a  list of each insurer and their rating method -'all attained age.

 

Wisconsin and a couple of other states don't have the same Medigap plans like other states.  No plan F, G, etc. - you buy a basic benefit package and then add whatever other coverage you want with a premium added for theses choices.  So you kind of design your Medigsp policy up to what Medicare approves as Medigap coverage.

 

Could we make it anymore complicate - Ya Think???????  Woman Frustrated

 

 

* * * * * * It’s Always Something - Roseanne Rosannadanna
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Re: Silver Sneakers being droped by AARP recommended insurer

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Message 270 of 593

I'm curious what others think:  What premium method is better and why?

 

Attained Age

Issue Age

Community Rated

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