Content starts here
CLOSE ×
Search
Reply
Anonymous
Not applicable

🏡 In YOUR Opinion, What Would Solve The Housing Crisis?

▶️To reply, click on reply button at bottom of this post. Enter your text. Click reply button again.◀️

 

*READ comments, ADD comment*

 

EACH year there are more HOMELESS age 50+ ending up on the street! 😭

 

It could be anyone of us or folks we know and care about.

 

Nicole 🏡 (Housing Forum)

4,654 Views
17
Report
Honored Social Butterfly

ALL AGES ARE WELCOME TO COMMENT!!! 👍

 

[1] Stop by when YOU can to leave a comment and/or READ the comments left by OTHERS.

 

[2] WE ALL have luv ones who are still young and I often wonder IF things will get better for them.

 

[3] What would be a SOLUTION(s) for YOUR community?

 

Thanks,

Nicole  ‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌👵‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌‌

0 Kudos
287 Views
0
Report
Honored Social Butterfly

Of late it seems to me that neighborhoods are being FORCED to "accept" Zoning Changes = squeezing in MORE buildings into TINY lots.

 

Personally I DO NOT feel we should all "suffer" for OUR COMMUNITY's refusal to explore more options.

 

With ZONING CHANGES come more traffic, more crime and yes, INCREASED housing costs.

 

And the CHEAP HOUSING still remains where people are dealing with Slum Landlords or Dishonest Builders.

 

In my humble opinion, it is time for communities to tour their area and then sit down with EVERYONE involved (not just the politicians and government) to SEEK SOLUTIONS.

 

Nicole  👵

0 Kudos
554 Views
0
Report
Honored Social Butterfly

In my opinion building FOR THE AREA would allow more workers to live in a SAFE environment.

 

For The Area means the NEEDS for that area needs to be EVALUATED.

 

These BAND AIDS like turning hotels/motels into housing does NOT resolve the increasing WORKING POOR.

 

Hard workers who are NOT making enough to live in a SAFE environment.

 

I think we need to return to Companies building for their staff with the OPTION to live there. Not everyone will want to. This would help the business to have employees in the area = no transportation issues. Public transportation is unreliable and non existent in some areas.  👵

0 Kudos
1,787 Views
0
Report
Regular Contributor

""The Housing Crisis" is a broad topic that envolves so much money, and employs so many people that makes it overwhelming to grasp.  There are so many moving parts.  However, while we await comprehensive audits on the systems we can do thing to relieve the suffering:

 

I believe the first thing is to stop pretending there are not people intentionally making housing market situations bad.  And stop ignoring people who are intentionally driving people into and keeping people in a status of homelessness. 

 

Serious Efforts must be stepped up to overcome those people sabotaging housing progress.  Then we have to get everyone housed somewhere, before we can consider whether it is the best housing match for them.  We can't continue to tell 2-3 million homeless people to wait for the construction of more affordable housing, that most of the homeless won't get in even after the construction.  That is one of the cruelest situations I have witnessed over the years. 

 

I have seen the miracles our governments do after major natural disasters; and after COVID-19 hit getting an entire population vaccinated; and after wars rebuilding entire communities.  We merely need the same leadership and citizenship focus and commitment to fixing the housing crisis!  There are some good plans out here, they need to be implemented and not divested.        

2,216 Views
0
Report
Honored Social Butterfly

It depends on the AGE of the person. Different "generations" are going to be dealing with different ISSUES.

 

(1) Your paycheck, IF still "working" should MATCH what Housing costs for YOUR location.

 

(2) Retired - what is coming into YOUR household should provide a SAFE environment.

 

My daughter belongs in (1) and doing well!

 

I belong in (2) and WONDER how I am NOT "homeless" since retiring in 2020. Yes, our RETIREMENT Social Security INCREASES every January - but so does our expenses...  😎

 

2,413 Views
0
Report
Periodic Contributor

Seniors now account for around one quarter of homeless in some big cities! The "silver tsunami" of retiring Boomers and the climbing cost of housing/low supply is expected to make those numbers increase even further. But HUD (who tracks the statistics on housing and homeless) doesn't recognize seniors & disabled (I would group them together) as a category separate from "Single (able-bodied, work-able) Adults", so the numbers are obscured. They only recognize three general categories: "YYA--Youth & Young Adults" (grouping 18-26 yr olds separately from other adults), Families, and "Single Adults" (27-100+); they also pay attention to veteran homeless, but not disabled or other vulnerable groups.

 

I have been a housing advocate for low income, seniors, disabled, women, and others for the last 18 yrs. The "affordable housing" "system" is Byzantine, even social workers don't fully understand it or know about all the options. Nonprofit housing providers are often poorly administered, patronizing and thoughtless toward clients/renters, and people often end up in housing that isn't appropriate with neighbors they don't want to be around &/or in unsafe or inconvenient areas (uphill from bus, no groceries nearby). It's a mess.

 

Learn your options, get on the rental wait lists even if you think you won't need them, do whatever it takes (including moving to a city/area far away with cheap rent) to avoid becoming homeless or stuck in a rental you don't want to be in.

3,462 Views
3
Report
Regular Contributor

Interesting comments.  Have you as an housing advocate discovered any effect ways to monitor the "waiting list", or are we simply at the mercy of the housing authorities and housing providers to play fairly?

2,277 Views
2
Report
Honored Social Butterfly

@jrmeans1 , I use to BELIEVE in Housing Assistance until I was "homeless" for 13 months. Yes, I could have moved back to Florida and burdened my only child. No, I stuck it out in the Roanoke Rescue Mission here in Virginia and SAVED. Because I was age 60, NOT a criminal or an addict, NO domestic violence and had worked ALL MY LIFE - I got ZERO housing assistance. I saved $5,000.00 which was all spent by the time I moved into my Studio Apartment in August 2018.  👵

 


[*** @jrmeans1 wrote:

Interesting comments.  Have you as an housing advocate discovered any effect ways to monitor the "waiting list", or are we simply at the mercy of the housing authorities and housing providers to play fairly? ***]


2,268 Views
1
Report
Regular Contributor

I have seen and experienced that treatment too; certain systems punish people for not having extreme problems, so they don't get assistance for long periods of time, and consequently they develop those extreme problems that could have been avoided with minimal assistance.  It's a flaw in the system that have been exploited for job security.

2,176 Views
0
Report
Anonymous
Not applicable

(2 comments) Whether we rent or own OUR housing, WE need to feel SAFE! 👍

 

Nicole 🙃

3,893 Views
1
Report
Periodic Contributor

Renters with an income that is at or below 60% of their areas Median Income should look for subsidized or (below Market Rate, rent-capped) Tax Credit apartments. 

 

www.affordablehousing.com is the best resource for learning about affordable rentals in general (explore the website & read about the different housing programs the gov't runs) and they have Section 8 and other "low income housing" listings. You can sign up for email alerts for Sec 8 wait list openings in any city(s)/state(s) you wish.

 

(P.S. Think you're not "low income"? Google your city or county name, "2023", and "AMI" to find out the current Area Median Income. If you are in a large urban area, chances are your income is 80% of AMI or lower. Congrats--you are considered "Low Income" and will qualify for most "affordable housing" programs although you may have to wait years for it! If you are at or below 40% I think (easy if your only income is from Social Security), you are "Very Low Income" and will have priority on subsidized housing wait lists.)

3,467 Views
0
Report
Bronze Conversationalist

Right now supply & demand, & costs fueled by inflation.

 

I just got a letter form my County Auditor, asking me to accurately describe my dwelling so they basically can increase my taxes by first half of 2025. All the houses in the neighborhood are basically cookie cutter, so everyone should have pretty much the same tax value, but they will price by your description, & I imagine there will be many different answers & definitions.  I always paid more than my neighbor, though her place has been updated, went to argue that fact the tax base should be the same on all the houses without turning in upgrades about 15 years ago & they ended up lowering both of our taxes slightly.  They just did a re-evaluation in '21, next one in '26 I believe.  

 

 Always trying to find a new way get their hand in your pocket, prosperity by taxation.  

4,553 Views
0
Report
Trusted Social Butterfly

Good topic @Anonymous .  It is astounding that for all the talk about philanthropy, and after hundreds of thousands of generations living in what we call civil society, our culture values Competition and the hoarding of worldly assets (which is obviously a form of mental illness) above universial provision of the first 2 levels of Maslow's Hierarchy of human needs.

It's more duplicitous than anything else.  A person hoards old newspapers, they're mentally ill.  A person hoards worldy assets to the detriment of fellow human beings they are elevated to positions of influence so they have better access to hoard even more.  It seems a self respecting, sentient species would have evolved a culture that distributes the necessities far more equitably.  In fact, examples of such cultures (not political ideologies) exist today, but they are marginalized at best and demonized at worst by the psychopathic cultures of the hoarders.

Our so-called leaders need to emulate those of some of the cultures they dismiss as primitive.

4,601 Views
2
Report
Regular Contributor

Sounds as though you have been thinking about the big picture.  Would be helpful if you shared some details about those cultures you mention "doing things right".  We need to see and hear about good examples to know it's possible in this kind of world.

2,266 Views
0
Report
Bronze Conversationalist

So all hoarding is a bad thing?  I would rather refer to them as "collectors", & as long as it does not turn into rotting food, garbage, or many animals (dead or alive). 

 

Your statement implies becoming minimalists?

 

Many of us did have parents/grandparents that went through the depression, so some of these ideals have been instilled on us, such as using items till they are useless, repurposing, etc.  

4,460 Views
0
Report
Anonymous
Not applicable

(2 comments) Well, on a personal level, I need the rent on my cute Studio Apartment to stay the same. EVERY April we get slapped with INCREASES for a property built in the 70's and NOT being updated or maintained.

 

Nicole 🙃

4,636 Views
1
Report
Conversationalist

Between my home insurance and property taxes, something goes up every year. What are you gonna do? It's always something, eh @GailL1

4,579 Views
0
Report
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Need to Know

"I downloaded AARP Perks to assist in staying connected and never missing out on a discount!" -LeeshaD341679

AARP Perks

More From AARP