Get the information you need to help care for your eyes at the AARP Eye Center. Visit it today!

Reply
Gold Conversationalist
0
Kudos
175
Views

Re: Age discrimination question

175 Views
Message 1 of 5

It does make us think that maybe half of these companies want to play like that they are American Idol with a stupid upper age limti of 28.  But what we need to do is to not put a boat load of jobs we may have had in our younger days.  For us, maybe we need to bug congress to take the age discrimination rule that was created in 1967 and put some teeth into it.  This having way too many years of talent excuse to me sounds pretty stupid.  If the company you may be applying for does have an upper age limit of 28, then that upper age limit needs to go out with the trash.  At Mercy, all we look for is the talent and that's all.  Mercy doesn't care how many years of experience you may have.  

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
175
Views
Valued Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
227
Views

Re: Age discrimination question

227 Views
Message 2 of 5

@DaveC489387 wrote:

I’m 62-years old, and when I apply for jobs I'm constantly told that I have too much experience. 


 

I cannot speak to the recording from the recruiter, which I assume you transcribed for your post here, but YES, companies can set a maximum amount of experience especially for external hires.

 

A case was decided in January 2019 on this very issue.  I believe the AARP LEGAL FOUNDATION played a part in representing the plaintiff in this case.

 

The way I understand the age discrimination law, to make this cover external hires, Congress would have to change the law.

 

CNBC 01/23/2019 - Age Bias Law Does Not Cover Job Applicants - U.S. Appeals Court

 

The case was Kleber vs CareFusion and it went on for a few years and through several courts and appeals - I believe this is the final verdict since I don't think it is being appealed any further up.

 

I think we talked about it here last year sometimes but I could not find it readily.

 

I think many times people think something is age discrimination but what they think and what the law says are sometimes two different things.  The law takes presidence.  Or I guess if people ever got together and made their point to Congress, perhaps the law could be changed.  That takes lots of work.

 

 

* * * * * * * * *
MY SIGNATURE: "It’s Always something" - Roseanne Rosannadanna
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
227
Views
Highlighted
Trusted Social Butterfly
0
Kudos
255
Views

Re: Age discrimination question

255 Views
Message 3 of 5

Holy crap! This guy responds by letter and is barely literate. Poor sentence structure, improper punctuation and I really like the 'gonna'. 

   I wouldn't want to work for a company that has a recruiter who doesn't know the King's English.


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
255
Views
Info Seeker
0
Kudos
270
Views

Re: Age discrimination question

270 Views
Message 4 of 5

For your consideration:

 

I have over 25 yeas in the HR arena raising throught the ranks for a specialist level to a senior HR executive with C-Suite experience.

 

To be candid, age discrimination does exist particularly in the age of "millennialism". Part of the issue is the inability to a recruiter to objectively look past their personal biases, the age of a candidate, but rather focus on the ability to perform, quality of experience and skills sets.  This tend to happen because a lot of recruiters are not properly trained in how to conduct a search and interview.  The focus is sometime to much on the job description vs the actual position requirement and nuances.  Recruiter tend to want to please the bosses' desires vs honest and realistic assessment of candidates.

 

Lastly, very few recruiter understand the concept and value of a "multi-generational" workforce.

 

Looks carefully at the vision & mission statement of the company, as well as how they have grown.  If you do diligently do some "deep-dive" research on a company (social media, etc) it may help you job search.

 

Good luck, keep moving forward.

 

 

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
270
Views
Info Seeker +
0
Kudos
312
Views
4
Replies

Age discrimination question

312 Views
Message 5 of 5

I’m 62-years old, and nowadays when I apply for jobs I'm constantly told that I’m “overqualified”, or that I have “too much experience”. Below is a recorded example of what one corporate recruiter told me when I applied for a financial analyst job. It seems someone like me would hurt the “dynamic of the team”, and not “set them up for success”.  I'd like to get your opinion on whether you believe “too much experience” is just code for “too **bleep** old”? Keep in mind that when I ask this, I’m not asking for a legal opinion on age discrimination. I just want to know how you would feel if this same recruiter told you what he told me. Would you want to do business with a company that treated seniors this way? Thanks very much for your feedback.     

 

Dave

 

CORPORATE RECRUITER COMMENTS - “I can tell you with my experience, when we’ve had individuals that have more that 15 to 20 years experience applying to analyst roles, they don’t get consideration. It’s just the thought process behind it is that they’re probably looking for someone a little bit more junior and it sets up for an uncomfortable conversation, just like you’re gonna have individuals that are in their twenties managing you, and you may not care about that, and you may not care about entering at that point, but like the dynamic of the team is what managers have shown me, it’s just like it doesn’t set them up for success.”

Report Inappropriate Content
0
Kudos
312
Views
4
Replies