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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Are you sure you are on the right site?  I understood "Chronic Pain" as being present most all the time.  If your's heals up on it's own, is it considered to be "Chronic Pain"?

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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@rdonihoo wrote:

I’m 66 years old, been on hydrocodone for over 15 years, take only when I

have pain, not addicted.  I want to travel during my retirement, so of these travels require stays longer than 30 days.  Due to current Medicare controlled drug rules, I cannot receive more that a 30 day supply at a time.  No provisions in the rules for vacations or traveling. My doctor will write the scrips for more than  30 days with proof of my travel itinerary.  I recently tried to get a 34 day supply of hydrocodone due to a extended travel plans,  the insurance company would not fill due to the Medicare 30 day rule.  Only option was to have the doctor write a separate scrip for the  4 extra days, which I had to pay out of pocket.   I’m sorry for all the people who cannot read the labels and kill themselves due to overdoses.  But it’s not fair to the millions of seniors who play by the rules, We are being punished for the stupidity of a miniorty group that insist on misusing the drugs.  am I wrong ?  Welcome comments,


Actually it is not Medicare that is making the rule changes on the prescribing of opioids - it is the CDC that issued them and since has issued some clarification but I don't think even the clarifications will help you. 

CDC 06/05/2019 - CDC Advises Against Misapplication of the Guideline for Prescribing Opioids for Chr...

 

I agree with aruzinsky on alternative meds - talk to your doctor.  You might want to consider this because it may be only time until your doctor talks to you about it - opioids for many chronic pain reasons is being proven to not be the best option.

 

You may not have a psychological addiction to opioids but your body physicially has learned to rely on them and if withdrawn abruptly, your body will probably experience withdrawals and not just pain from whatever ails you.

Mayo Clinic - Tapering off opioids: When and how

If you've taken opioid medications for more than a couple of weeks, it's likely you need to stop soon — and stop slowly, to avoid severe symptoms of withdrawal.

 

Yes, doctors are looking for alternative treatments for various chronic pain conditions - mediation or other types of treatment.  The conditions that will continue to receive opioid treatments are being limited to pretty much patients in active cancer treatment or are terminally ill with treatment being discontinued, patients experiencing acute sickle cell crises, patients experiencing post-surgical pain (limited and monitored closely) or from an extreme traumatic injury, again limited and monitored.

 

I am not sure how much advocacy is going to change this situation,  specifically because there are other ways, scientifically proven, to treat many chronic pain issues without the use of long term opioids - other medications or other treatments -

Talk To Your Doctor - perhaps you can find another treatment and one that will free you up to travel.

 

 

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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@rdonihoo wrote:

I’m 66 years old, been on hydrocodone for over 15 years, take only when I

have pain, not addicted.  I want to travel during my retirement, so of these travels require stays longer than 30 days.  Due to current Medicare controlled drug rules, I cannot receive more that a 30 day supply at a time.  No provisions in the rules for vacations or traveling. My doctor will write the scrips for more than  30 days with proof of my travel itinerary.  I recently tried to get a 34 day supply of hydrocodone due to a extended travel plans,  the insurance company would not fill due to the Medicare 30 day rule.  Only option was to have the doctor write a separate scrip for the  4 extra days, which I had to pay out of pocket.   I’m sorry for all the people who cannot read the labels and kill themselves due to overdoses.  But it’s not fair to the millions of seniors who play by the rules, We are being punished for the stupidity of a miniorty group that insist on misusing the drugs.  am I wrong ?  Welcome comments,


Of course, they are unfair but your viewpoint is shallow in that you don't know who your enemies are and I do. The cause of the problem is overwhelming sympathy for the self inflicted injuries of drug abusers within our culture. And, the prevailing sympathizers of those with self inflicted injuries, not just drug abusers, are Liberals.

 

Drug abusers should not only be allowed to kill themselves, it should be encouraged. I have the opposite of sympathy for drug abusers because they and their liberal guardians decrease my quality of life.

 

A possible, but, unlikely solution to your problem is to switch to a Schedule IV opioid, which, depending on your state, allows a 90 day supply and 3 refills.  The problem is that you have to be genetically abnormal for any Schedule IV opioid to be effective. 

 

Some are

 

Tramadol

 

Pentazocine/naloxone

 

Butorphanol

 

I regularly take pentazocine/naloxone with good results.  I have tried the other two and butorphanol is also effective for me.  Tramadol has no noticeable effect on me.  I reiterate, it is genetic.

 

 

Old Witch
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I’m 66 years old, been on hydrocodone for over 15 years, take only when I

have pain, not addicted.  I want to travel during my retirement, so of these travels require stays longer than 30 days.  Due to current Medicare controlled drug rules, I cannot receive more that a 30 day supply at a time.  No provisions in the rules for vacations or traveling. My doctor will write the scrips for more than  30 days with proof of my travel itinerary.  I recently tried to get a 34 day supply of hydrocodone due to a extended travel plans,  the insurance company would not fill due to the Medicare 30 day rule.  Only option was to have the doctor write a separate scrip for the  4 extra days, which I had to pay out of pocket.   I’m sorry for all the people who cannot read the labels and kill themselves due to overdoses.  But it’s not fair to the millions of seniors who play by the rules, We are being punished for the stupidity of a miniorty group that insist on misusing the drugs.  am I wrong ?  Welcome comments,

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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"4.The following is from the CDC site:

Recent Findings ƒ Since 2000, the age-adjusted drug-poisoning death rate more than doubled, from 6.2 per 100,000 in 2000 to 14.7 per 100,000 in 2014. ƒ In 2014, 47,055 deaths involved drug poisoning. Of these, 82% were unintentional, 12% were suicides, and 6% were of undetermined intent. ƒ In 2014, 40% of drug-poisoning deaths involved opioid analgesics (18,893 deaths). ƒ The age-adjusted rate for deaths involving opioid analgesics nearly quadrupled, from 1.5 per 100,000 in 2000 to 5.9 per 100,000 in 2014. ƒ In 2014, nearly 65% of all deaths from opioid analgesics involved natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics, such as hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone. SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, 2000–2014."

 

You didn't say who these people are.  Are they chronic pain patients?  Are they from illegal drug use? How old are they? This is what bothers me about these types of statistics.

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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What are your methods?
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Are you a doctor, or even a pain management doctor?  The overhanded government crackdown on doctors, pharmaceutical companies and distributors have made it impossible for many legitimate, innocent chronic pain patients to get the pain medication they need to lead a normal and productive life. The drug addicts deserve empathy as well as proper help with therapy and addiction treatment, but the legitimate chronic pain patients should be given more priority.

 

You haven't said anything that is helpful to me as my quality of life has been reduced to being bedridden from vertabral compression fractures from severe osteoporosis.  I am unable now to attain any pain medication due to the 'opioid crisis'.  My future looks bleak.  There is no way I can go for walks, cook, exercise, or even shower.  The only thing that has helped has been morphine and fentanyl patches that have been prescribed by professional pain management doctors; of which there are few nowadays.  I now not on anything and even though I won't, I've considered trying to get them illegally out of desparation.  But even if I wanted to I couldn't get out of bed to try.

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Hello all, I have been working in the field of health since 1996. I specialize in managing chronic conditions, stress management, pain management, am a 'Stepping On' falls prevention class leader, caregiver, and manage my own chronic health conditions which include dual hip replacements. Managing chronic conditions is an extra job we don't necessarily enjoy though it is required of us...in order to achieve a quality of life I am content with, I have found a number of methods that allow me a great deal of freedom, minimal medication use, provides me with sound sleep, and pain I can tolerate and minimize.

 

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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@denvermrr wrote:

I have been suffering from chronic pain sice 2002. In 2000 I had to have a cervical fusion that was successful then 2 years later, I began having pain again, I was then diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I am seeing a great pain management doctor now, but due to allergies and side effects, the only things that helps my pain are opiates, MS Contin, Dilauddid. However, when I go to the ER or a new doctor, the first thing that the nurses and doctors tell me is that I have to stop the narcotics. I feel so asshamed that now I will not even go to the ER when I should. I had a milkd heart attack in October, 2014 and the resident who was taking care of me would not give me anything for pain and called me a drug seeker, then said that the doctors who prescribed the medicatios for me should not be allowed to practice medicine. I got up the next morning and left the hospital and have not been back since. Even though there have been several times that the chest pain is so bad that I have fallen to the floor in the grocery store. I am so frustrated at being treated like this and there is nothing to do. I feel sorry for the doictors that really care because now, they have to see a patient for a precription for Vicodin. The situation with the pain medication abuse is terrible, but why are we, the ones who benefit from it, are the ones suffering? I did not choose to be "Opiate Tolerant" but that is what the pain management doctor has as one of my diagnoses.


I have severe degenerative disc disease and was on opiods with success for 10 years. then due to some drug addicts, and the pharmaceutical companies breaking the law, I was taken off. since then i sit all day.

 

So it begins.
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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I agree! The only time I had a doctor really help me was one who had the same condition!
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