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Re: Managing chronic pain

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"4.The following is from the CDC site:

Recent Findings ƒ Since 2000, the age-adjusted drug-poisoning death rate more than doubled, from 6.2 per 100,000 in 2000 to 14.7 per 100,000 in 2014. ƒ In 2014, 47,055 deaths involved drug poisoning. Of these, 82% were unintentional, 12% were suicides, and 6% were of undetermined intent. ƒ In 2014, 40% of drug-poisoning deaths involved opioid analgesics (18,893 deaths). ƒ The age-adjusted rate for deaths involving opioid analgesics nearly quadrupled, from 1.5 per 100,000 in 2000 to 5.9 per 100,000 in 2014. ƒ In 2014, nearly 65% of all deaths from opioid analgesics involved natural and semisynthetic opioid analgesics, such as hydrocodone, morphine, and oxycodone. SOURCE: CDC/NCHS, National Vital Statistics System, 2000–2014."

 

You didn't say who these people are.  Are they chronic pain patients?  Are they from illegal drug use? How old are they? This is what bothers me about these types of statistics.

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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What are your methods?
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Are you a doctor, or even a pain management doctor?  The overhanded government crackdown on doctors, pharmaceutical companies and distributors have made it impossible for many legitimate, innocent chronic pain patients to get the pain medication they need to lead a normal and productive life. The drug addicts deserve empathy as well as proper help with therapy and addiction treatment, but the legitimate chronic pain patients should be given more priority.

 

You haven't said anything that is helpful to me as my quality of life has been reduced to being bedridden from vertabral compression fractures from severe osteoporosis.  I am unable now to attain any pain medication due to the 'opioid crisis'.  My future looks bleak.  There is no way I can go for walks, cook, exercise, or even shower.  The only thing that has helped has been morphine and fentanyl patches that have been prescribed by professional pain management doctors; of which there are few nowadays.  I now not on anything and even though I won't, I've considered trying to get them illegally out of desparation.  But even if I wanted to I couldn't get out of bed to try.

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Hello all, I have been working in the field of health since 1996. I specialize in managing chronic conditions, stress management, pain management, am a 'Stepping On' falls prevention class leader, caregiver, and manage my own chronic health conditions which include dual hip replacements. Managing chronic conditions is an extra job we don't necessarily enjoy though it is required of us...in order to achieve a quality of life I am content with, I have found a number of methods that allow me a great deal of freedom, minimal medication use, provides me with sound sleep, and pain I can tolerate and minimize.

 

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@denvermrr wrote:

I have been suffering from chronic pain sice 2002. In 2000 I had to have a cervical fusion that was successful then 2 years later, I began having pain again, I was then diagnosed with Fibromyalgia. I am seeing a great pain management doctor now, but due to allergies and side effects, the only things that helps my pain are opiates, MS Contin, Dilauddid. However, when I go to the ER or a new doctor, the first thing that the nurses and doctors tell me is that I have to stop the narcotics. I feel so asshamed that now I will not even go to the ER when I should. I had a milkd heart attack in October, 2014 and the resident who was taking care of me would not give me anything for pain and called me a drug seeker, then said that the doctors who prescribed the medicatios for me should not be allowed to practice medicine. I got up the next morning and left the hospital and have not been back since. Even though there have been several times that the chest pain is so bad that I have fallen to the floor in the grocery store. I am so frustrated at being treated like this and there is nothing to do. I feel sorry for the doictors that really care because now, they have to see a patient for a precription for Vicodin. The situation with the pain medication abuse is terrible, but why are we, the ones who benefit from it, are the ones suffering? I did not choose to be "Opiate Tolerant" but that is what the pain management doctor has as one of my diagnoses.


I have severe degenerative disc disease and was on opiods with success for 10 years. then due to some drug addicts, and the pharmaceutical companies breaking the law, I was taken off. since then i sit all day.

 

So it begins.
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I agree! The only time I had a doctor really help me was one who had the same condition!
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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HI,

 

I had many of the same problems, but didn't want surgery every 6 months bc nerves grow back. So I take a topical cream called Voltarin (generic) & it lasts forever. gets rid of nerve pain, fibro, arthritis and back pain (broken 3x.) $50 per tube that lasts 3 months. Perhaps someone could take advantage of this ortho cream. Beats surgery anyday & not that expensive. Just have to wait 10 minutes after shower for it to absorb. So, brush teeth, do hair, etc. Miracle for me.

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That's the answer to most. chronic pain is to be able to use some type of medical marijuana so morphine-type drugs can be used as a last resort. Drs Gupta and Oz r doing their best to get the powers that be to rethink cannabis as a great option for many severe illnesses. People must open their minds and educate themselves.
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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  Not sure what you mean by being "on the other side of fence"?  Someone in the medical field or someone who does not have chronic pain at a level that needs strong pain killers?  I'm a nurse but had to go on disability 12 years ago due to fibromyalgia, spinal stenosis, migraines,and inflammatory arthritis.  I'm 62 now and still miss being a nurse.  I developed fibromyalgia in my late 20s but was not diagnosed until my mid 30s.  I still continued to work with increasing pain until my 

Late 40s.  I miss the medical field and I miss the money I would have made if I could have continued to work. 

    There are people who have good pain tolerance.  My mother never had headaches or menstruated cramps so it was hard for her to understand those who did until she developed polymyalgia rheumatica and developed severe headaches.  That was a game changer.  So the things you suggest are all very good 

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