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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 21 of 57
Do you or have you taken Neurontin for your nerve pain? Good Luck with your pain control. I have chronic pain and I'm on a number of pain medications. It's all in the mind, if you know you are only taking them for the pain and you stick to the prescribed dose and no more than that then you have a good chance of being okay. I've been on pain meds for 5 years and I've never asked for an increase in my dosage. Again, good luck.!
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 22 of 57
You are right to a point. Some people have diseases that hurt so bad the only option is to take opiates. I have Arachnoiditis which is a severe ner e disease. I started off just using non opiates but as I progressed it became a nesissity to take the opiates just so I could have some kind of quality of life. Did I want to go down this road? Absolutely not! I was scared to death of these meds. I had never taken a pain pill in my life. I was afraid that I was going to become addicted.I had my therapist explain to me the definition of addiction. All though my body needs these medicines to function as best as I can. My mind is NOT dependent on them. If they were to find a cure for Arachnoiditis tomorrow I would be first in line to properly take me off these opiates.
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 23 of 57
I agree with you! It upsets me to hear when they talk about more and more tough laws on opioids. It ruins it for us that have chronic pain that only one medicine helps. I do not abuse mine but bad apples are ruining it for the rest of us! If Over the counter medicine worked believe me I would take it and get off the prescribed medicine but Tylonal, Advil and ibuphrophin don't do anything to help with the pain!
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 24 of 57
You have hit the nail on the head. I have been suffering from a nerve disease called Arachnoiditis, it is extremely painful and will never go away. It took me 4 years to not only get diagnosed but to find a doctor that would treat me as I use several opiates and other medicines so that I can get out of bed and have a so-called "normal" life. There are Pain Management Doctors out there but not nearly enough. I have to drive 3 hours one way to see mine. Thank god I only have to do that once every 3 months, it is very hard on me. We need to fight for more doctors to help the more than a million people that suffer from "Chronic Pain".
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 25 of 57

As one of those people who suffer from long term chronic pain, I agree totally with your observation. Doctors seem to give up because they do not know what to do with us.  We need doctors that specialize in Chronic Pain Management that do not view us as "pill seekers". All we want is pain management so that we can live a life as close to normal as possible to be able to enjoy time with our family and friend as we use to.

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 26 of 57

The best way to avoid becoming addicted to opioids, is to decline them if or when your doctor offers them to you. There are plenty of other effective pain-relieving medications that are not narcotics. Try them first.

I have arthritis/DJD. Walking and/or standing for long periods of time can become painful. Still, I try to get out for a long walk each day which helps me avoid muscle cramps that accompany the arthritis pain.

I've had to start carrying Tylenol with me just about everywhere I go. I haven't given in to the pain yet, but I have had to adjust my life according to the pain. I still have goals that I'd like to cross off the old 'bucket list'.

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 27 of 57

Hi everyone! I am new to this discussion but can only say that the FDA only lists 2 types of pain management. Short term pain, typically that is over after several weeks, and Chronic Pain that is defined as pain longer than 3 months, or that last after time needed for tissue to heal. All pain recommendations and education do not deal with pain treatments longer than that. Most all helpful medications for long term pain are "Controlled Substances". Guidelines only address abuse. In fact the FDA released in January 2016 new guidelines for Opiod pain medication management. There are no recommendations for patients that use Opiods for long term pain management. It is not even discussed other than to present a monitoring attitude for Doctors to recognize abuse. Doctors are held accountable as a Police Force for abuse accountability only. I agree that Opiod Pain Medications do have a bad abuse history, but please do not categorize my needs as that of an abuser.

 

i would like to see a new term for Chronic Pain that lasts longer than a year. Thousands of people are categorized into the two types of pain that do not recognize pain that lasts for years as a treatable need. As pain is continued after treated care options a "I have done all I can, Good Luck" attitude by Doctors, Surgeons and Therapists follows individuals who continue with Opiod Pain Management. I would like to introduce a new category, "Consequential Chronic Pain", or CCP. As pain continues after 12 months, or as in those who continue to have Chronic Pain and Opiod Pain Management for decades, Doctors and all Medical Practioners alike do not want to stay involved. Consequences follow and Individuals are left to try on their own to find someone to help and stay involved. CCP also leads to severe complications as the body becomes adjusted to Opiods and strips the body of automated mechanisms that control pain receptors in the body, but also destroy body function over time with Opiod Induced Constipation (OIC), desensitized insulin control for sugar leading to Diabetes and to the inability of the body to absorb nutrients and vitamins leading to all sorts of complications that are being seen in CCP individuals currently. Yet no real therapies are taught to compassionately help. Medical attitudes are mute to recommendations other that Opiods are bad and if used long term result in abuse. Would a Diabetic be tested every six months randomly to verify that an individual is not abusing their medications? This analogy may be a little dramatic, but an attitude needs to be afforded to CCP individuals that does not come off as an abuser, but as a need for a more compassionate, caring and educated Medical Practioner with a better understanding of CCP and how to treat as in any other medical need.

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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 28 of 57

Hi,

 I am new to this site on AARP so I hope I am doing this right.  I am so sorry to hear of your chronic pain issues. I myself have suffered from chronic pain since I wan 29 which was way back in 1989. I progressively got worse until there were days I could not get out of bed. I am disabled now due to a whole host of health issues. I see a pain management doctor every month and have had epidurals, saddle blocks, and facet injections. None of them really worked for me. In fact when I had the facet injections they made it worse. For about 10 years I was taking 30mg of morphine every 4 hours and 150mcg fentanyl patch changed every day. All that relieved the pain a little but relived the weight of my wallet a lot! Fentanyl is very expensive. I wont tell you how much I spend on all (32) my meds each month because I dont want to shock or scare you. 

 Anyway, what I wanted to ask you is if your doctor has suggested a Medtronic Neuro-Pain Stimulator? The couldnt operate on my back because they couldnt find anything that wouldnt be to hard that it would break down the surrounding area or to soft that it wouldnt be effective.

I have Ossteoporosis, Rheumatoid Arthritis, Fibromyalgia, Osteo Arthritis and Scoliosis along with a long list of other things, I have something wrong with every disc in my spine from the base of my skull to my tailbone, I have also broken my back 3 times. The last time I broke it I bent over a little to wipe of the seat of a chair and when I stood up I broke it in 2 places. 

Back to the Neuro-Pain Stimulator, they put a temporary one in for 10 days and if it does not relieve your pain by 50% they dont do a permanent one. I have a hight tolerance for pain and also for medications so they could never give me enough meds to reduce my pain more than 20% but that atleast allowed me to get out of bed,. I couldnt do anything but I was up. When they put the temporary pump in I told them it relived about 40% of the pain and they decided that they would do it anyway because it worked better than the meds,   

All I can say now is Thank You God for that decision and sending me to that doctor.  My chronic pain is very bearable now and somedays I dont have any back pain at all!!! To me it was like getting granted a miracle. 

If your doctor hasnt mentioned this to you, mention it to him and see what he says, Look it up on line, Medtronic Neuro--Pain Stimulator, I am sorry I dont have the actual web address but I found it by typing that in.

May God heal your pain

 

NancyB
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 29 of 57
Wow does your story sound just like mine! I've had fibromyalgia for 10 years & the stigma re pain meds is horrible! At one point my husband took me to the ER at our local hospital, they immediately decided I just wanted more pain meds including a Dr who was in charge of admissions. He stated that more drugs would kill me. My husband complained but it was a mute point. I have never abused any meds, I go to a pain clinic with very strict polices including random drug testing. I would not wish this nightmare on anyone it has cost me too much in every posible way. Currently I take 15mg of mophine sulfate ER 3 times a day for pain. I have a Medicare advantage plan that has either removed any meds I take or has moved the generics into the higher tiers. All of my medications are generic but only one is in the first tier. My first Rx this year for Morphine Sulfate cost $95.00! I no longer take the generic for Norco it was removed from the formulary in 2015. The option I was given was for Hydromorphone which made me too drowsy plus gave me horrible nightmares. I've tried lyrica but had horrible side effects & I couldn't afford it or the similar meds anyway! Alternative treatments do work but none of them are covered! I've paid out of pocket for them but being on SSDI doesn't make up for the salary I had. Currently I'm seeing a MFRT which has helped but @ $70.00 a week I'm not sure how long I can afford it. I sometimes feel like a victim due to the unaffordable generic meds & no coverage for alternative therapies. My goal is to not take any meds but controlling the pain is hard. I know others are a lot worse off but inferring that all of us with fibromyalgia are only wanting pain drugs is not only insulting, degrading but costly. Talk about being between a rock and a hard place😁
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Re: Managing chronic pain

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Message 30 of 57

@Jivanchich wrote:
I have a similar story, but I would like to ask is who can we write to or how can we start a grassroots movement to change this law and possibly make it easier and cheaper for seniors to get their medications without the monthly doctor visit. My expenses every month plus addition $50 every few months for a drug test added to the visit (to make sure I'm taking it and not selling it????) is money needed elsewhere. My back doctor says my spine is not fixable. I do not want to lay around in pain until I die. And making it a crime to assume and accuse someone of being an addict because they worked hard 40+ years and are paying a physical price.

Jivanchich,

It seems the FDA is already seeing this tighter control method work but at the detriment of many patients who take these reclassified pain medications.

 

Even back in 2013, they were told how these new pain med classifications would affect those who depend on them for relief.

 

New York Times 10/24/2013 F.D.A. Urging a Tighter Rein on Painkillers

 

from the link ~

"For years, F.D.A. officials had rejected recommendations from the D.E.A. and others for stronger prescribing controls on the drugs, saying the action would create undue hardships for patients. A number of doctors’ groups, including the American Medical Association and pharmacy organizations, have continued to fight the measure, citing the impact on patients.

In a telephone interview, Dr. Woodcock said that F.D.A. officials were aware that changing the prescribing rules would affect patients.

 

She said, however, that the impact on public health caused by the abuse of the drugs as well as their medical use had reached a tipping point.

 

“These are very difficult trade-offs that our society has to make,” she said. “The reason we approve these drugs is for people in pain. But we can’t ignore the epidemic on the other side.”

 

. . . . The F.D.A. recommendation is likely to have a significant impact on the availability of the drugs, as well as on how pharmacies operate and even the types of medical professionals who can prescribe the medications.

 

In recent years, the question of whether to tighten prescribing controls over hydrocodone-containing drugs has been the subject of intense lobbying.

 

Last year (2012), for example, lobbyists for druggists and chain pharmacies mobilized to derail a measure passed in the Senate that would mandate the types of restrictions that the F.D.A. is now recommending.

 

At the time, the lobbying arm of the American Cancer Society said that making patients see doctors more often to get prescriptions would impose added burdens and costs on them.

 

. . . . Dr. Woodcock, of the F.D.A., said that requiring patients with long-lasting pain to see a doctor after three months, rather than six, for a new prescription could benefit them. “If you are needing chronic therapy of this magnitude,” she said, “you should be seeing your prescriber.”

 

read more at the link ~

 

The government has spoken - in order to stop those who use these drugs illegally - we must control the substance realizing that this control puts a burden on those who need these drugs for relief.

* * * * It's Always Something . . . Roseanne Roseannadanna
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