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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Hi, @DouglasF182890 -

 

Thanks for reaching out!  

 

As you'll know from looking at previous messages on this thread, I don't believe in recommending specific kinds of jobs for people.  I believe that particularly after all of your experience, somewhere inside you, you have the best idea of what that job is that you want to do that's going to fill you with a sense of meaning and purpose.

 

My five-step process for figuring this out starts with your willingness to review and reframe any outdated or limiting beliefs about what you're good at, what you can or can't do, or how the world works. 

 

Then, talk to the people who know you well (and for a long time) and drill down into how they perceive you, what you have done best (and worst) in your work to date, and what possible ideas you could or should pursue. 

 

Then, I encourage you to confront any baggage you may have around the work you've done to date - all of the wrongs that have been done to you, the disappointments around missed opportunities, deals gone wrong, bridges burned etc. etc.  It's time to forgive all that (including yourself) for the past.  Everything is a lesson, and you've got to be able to bring a positive attitude and a beginner's mind to your next act.  If you don't, any lingering hesitation or bitterness or cynicism will be felt by those around you.  And you don't want that happening in a job interview!  

 

Next step is to "workshop" the career ideas you're thinking about.  Do your research, immerse yourself in this new area (or areas if you're trying to narrow it down).  Meet the people, take notes, make plans, run spreadsheets, get domain-specific advice (e.g. from the Small Business Administration if you're thinking of launching a new business). Create mind maps, vision boards - anything to capture all the pros and cons of the prospective job, career, or business you're considering.  Share it with your close friends and trusted advisors.  Make it an iterative process to figure out where and how you'll be happy in your new career.  Sit with it until you've dispelled all the doubts and are crystal clear about what it's going to look like.

 

Finally, use your network to make it happen.  Don't think that sending out resumes is going to get you a job. That's the biggest mistake you can make (just look at the people on this thread who have been stymied by that approach...).  Know the value proposition that you're bringing forward, and how the role or the business you're contemplating can make clear dollars-and-cents impact (i.e the "ROI").  The more clear and concise you can be about what you want to do, the easier you're making it for friends, colleagues, and connections to help you find the employer, partner, investor or other connector to get you where you want to go.

 

Yes, it's a lot more involved than saying "I'm going to look for a job as a Marketing VP in the golf industry."  Good luck on that approach.  You'll be competing with younger and likely cheaper candidates who will get the nod before you do (ageism is an unfortunate reality...).

 

The bar has been raised for older job seekers.  Think of yourself as a consultant providing value to a client vs. an employee taking direction from a boss.

 

What is the special synthesis of everything you've learned and loved about your work in real estate?  Jot it all down on a white board and imagine how it could be portable to other businesses or industries.  Again, your network is the key.

 

Hope that's helpful!  Let me know if you have any more questions.  And if the five-step approach sounds interesting, check out my book, which goes into all the details.

 

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 2 of 50

Hello,

I want to make a career change.as I'm tired of not making money on a regular basis.

Currently, I'm a Realtor for 6 years, and have a background in finance, insurance, investments.

I'm 63 years old.

Any suggestions?

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Wow @ColorMyWorld72  -

 

Let me get this straight:  your boss has worked with you successfully for 28 years, and yet is so jealous or petty that if you leave to do something else, he's going to play the victim and cross his arms and not give you a recommendation?

 

Well, I guess there are some small-minded people out there - although that's scant comfort for you at this point.

 

Still, do you think there's a way of salvaging this?  Could you take him to lunch and acknowledge him for being a great boss (he had to be at least "OK" or you probably wouldn't have stayed with him for 28 years, right?).  If he feels like you really appreciate the relationship, and his leadership and guidance, he might not feel so hurt that you want to leave.

 

Explain to him that this is not against him or against the company.  It's really about you wanting to grow more as a person and as a professional, and since he has (ostensibly) supported you in that process over all this time, he's got to be able to see that maybe after 28 years, it's time for you to "go to grow."

 

Ask him what his biggest concerns are.  If he is afraid of the problem he's going to have in replacing you, what about reassuring him that you'll work with him to find and train your replacement?  Maybe there's already someone at the company who he already knows who would be the right fit for your position (that would make it even easier).  Is he concerned about confidentiality and trade secrets and you "stealing" ideas or maybe clients/customers?  You can reassure him that that is not your plan or intent. 

 

Explain to him from the heart what you want to do and why it is so important to you.  Again, make it about you growing, not about you being bored or dissatisfied with your current job.  The more he understands your motivation and hopefully empathizes with you, the less he'll be upset with you.

 

If all else fails, and you can't get him to budge, it's not the end of the world.

 

Over these 28 years, you've got to have developed some great relationships, both in the company and with vendors/suppliers/partners.  Ask them to write recommendations for you on Linkedin on your profile.  To make it easy, do some research on what goes into the best-written LinkedIn recommendtions, then write a draft of each recommendation that the individuals can each customize by adding their own personal details or style to the text.  Once they've agreed to do the recommendation (and let them know you'll help draft it to make it easier - a good incentive for them!) send them the draft in an email and let them revise it and paste it into the LinkedIn recommendation interface.

 

The fact that you were in 3 positions at the same company over 28 years is in itself a recommendation.  You don't have to get your boss' recommendation to be validated.  Actually, the recommendations of colleagues and external people you did business with may carry more weight because they're actually more transactional.

 

By the way, to do all this, you already have to be connected to your recommenders on LinkedIn as 1st-level connections.  So if you're not a LinkedIn user already, you should get busy building out your profile (see other messages on this thread).  You'll need a good LinkedIn profile in any event as you embark on your next act.

 

Let me know if you have any further questions!

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 4 of 50

testing

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 5 of 50

I would like to know what to do if I don't have any job references. I have had my same boss for 28 years (3 different jobs). I have told him I want to leave to do something different. He said if I leave he won't give me a reference.

 

Thank you.

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level!

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Message 6 of 50

Hi, Olif @Olif  -

 

We're only conducting public conversations regarding career questions.

 

I encourage you to post your questions here.  Please also review the other questions and responses on this thread for helpful information!

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Want to take your career to the next level!

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I wish to inquire about a number of concerns regarding to career change.

 

Please forward all replies directly to me. I will reply accordingly

 

Thank you.

 

Olif Spear

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 8 of 50

Thanks, Tim - @tw38214439 

 

Well, you've certainly picked a very high-end way to go.  All of the tools work well, but they are expensive (esp. Clickfunnels), but they do work.  My only concern is that you're investing in the big guns before you have the audience or the proof-of-concept for your program.  Better to start smaller and cheaper and develop your audience, find out through direct feedback what they actually need, want, and like.  Paid ads can deliver these people to you, but unless you've nurtured them with your content and engagement, you're going to get a really low conversion.

 

If I'm understanding you correctly, your ads are selling your program, not signing people up to your list.  From my understanding of digital marketing, that's risky.  

 

I get that you are indeed an expert in your field, and that can go a long way towards driving conversion.  But that also depends on your price point.  Testimonials are also key, so if you don't have credible clients who've been through your training, you're likely going to lose conversions.

 

I can't stress how important your content marketing is to this process (blogging, articles, interviews, social engagement).  You have be perceived as an expert not only by your b.g., but by the content and detailed information that people can get from you that supports your program.  It's the premise that you have to basically give away a large proportion of your content to persuade people that the remaining 20% (or whatever) has got to be worth the hundreds of dollars you're asking them to spend.

 

Wishing you all the best with this!

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 9 of 50

Hi John, Sorry, I replied to the wrong email in answer to your questions. I hired my first coach who was all about FB ads to begin the funnel (FB ad-Free webinar-Application-Free phone call w me to determine if they are a good fit).Within this are a ton of apps cobbled together which drives me nuts (Clickfunnels is the main one but also OnceHub, Vimeo,Aweber, among others) but I am slowly progressing. I was inspired with this strategy as I didn't have to cultivate an organic online tribe.... you buy them through ads. I was delayed a year because really complicated apps of Kajabi and Everwebinar with the FB ads manager didn't work well for me. I "launched" several times but the duct tape didn't hold the apps together, hence Clickfunnels. I must admit to occcasionally losing heart over the last 18 months before beginning again. What keeps me going is the fact that so many peoples lives depend on me providing this information and expertise. So badly needed!

My 6 week program is 1:1(30 minute weekly coaching on the phone) and goup (once weekly Zoom sessions). All curriculum content is evergreen online as well as lifetime access to the private FB group for Q&A.

My content is based on best practices, my personalparticipation in 250,000K patient interactions, my own history and extensive research in drug-free pain treatment including my second book on natural health "Feet, Fork and Fun: How To Fail Your Way To Fitness". The approach is cutting edge thought and action on three fronts: physical ("Feet" or exercise), chemical ("Fork" or nutrition) and most importantly emotional ("Fun" or headspace).

Since I will initially buy clients with online ads I have not done much w platform building however I just started a blog (The Spine Sherpa). Any additional advice would be much appreciated. Best Regards, Dr. Tim Warren

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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 10 of 50

Wow, Tricia @TriciaS290892 -  That's a lot of job apps!

 

I totally hear your sense of frustration.  You are NOT at the end of your rope.  

 

I'm sure they do love you in these interviews, but the chances are that they're a) a bit intimidated, and b) misinformed about how older workers operate.  The conventional bias is that you're going to be too expensive (and you've already checked that box), and that you're not going to stay long, and that your skills are outdated, and that you won't fit with the younger crowd.  

 

These are all, of course, false assumptions, but as I've said over and over on this thread, we're not going to change anyone's mind overnight.

 

My prescription (and, shameless plug, I invite you to take a look at my book, which spells this out in great detail) is to think of yourself as a consultant providing value to a client, not as an employee looking to take directions from a manager.

 

After all this time in your profession, you should be able to identify where things are broken, how things can be fixed, and where the business is going.  You are uniquely positioned to provide the fix for one or two of these crucial gaps in your field (find an expert niche!).  You also have decades of experience and, most importantly, connections to be able to vet your assessment of what needs to be fixed, and how.

 

85% of jobs are filled by referrals, not by job postings.  So it's no surprise you're not getting any traction.  Focus on your network.  But in order to do that effectively, you have to come up with the specific value proposition that you bring to the table.  I don't know your business, so I can't advise you specifically.  But others you've worked with (including and especially former supervisors if you're on good enough terms) can help you narrow down your pitch so that it is something you can do with great authority and effectiveness, but also with gusto and confidence.

 

Then you have to re-craft your LinkedIn profile to fully embody that value proposition, including the "why" you do what you do, and the meaning/purpose you get from your work.  Use the profile Headline and About sections to underscore WHO you are, not WHAT you do (that comes in the Experience section).

 

Armed with this consistent, expressive, and most of all topical narrative, you are positioned to grab the attention of both potential employers and potential clients.  Your prior employers and colleagues, who are now working in other companies most likely, could be the first people to either hire you or refer you to someone who needs your services.

 

No matter whether you get hired into a fulltime position providing this service, or wind up with multiple clients (on potentially monthly, or yearly contracts), you're exercising greater control over your career, and only focusing on opportunities that are right for you.

 

Otherwise, you're trying to hit a distant target with one arm tied behind you and a blindfold on.

 

Make sense?  Let me know if you have further questions!

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