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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 31 of 45
I worked in government almost 27 years. I could retire with full benefits after 25 years. And maximum benefits with 26.75 years. Because there were voids in management and key positions I decided to tell my bosses the date of my resignation. My intentions were to train managers and fill the voids in the key positions. The thing that happened was that they wanted to stretch me beyond my area of responsibility so I would leave early. They put no thought to the proper structure of my crews or their training capabilities. I ended up taking stress leave for the last 6 months of my tenure. During that time I got healthy and retired in great health while my three crews and the entities they served were left in disarray.
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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 32 of 45
I also had that kind of treatment during my last year. I was also a high performer.
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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 33 of 45
I work in senio-level HR position and would provide only as much notice as I'd be willing to be walked to the door and not be paid for (minimum two weeks). Realistically things do change between employer and employee once you notify them that you are leaving. This isn't like it was forty years ago; this is about business. This is information you should keep very private as it may effect opportunities, raises, reviews, how you are treated, and how much longer they let you work at the company. If you want to determine how and when you exit, zip it.
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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 34 of 45

@BearonaBicycle - I had to go back & read your original post, about being treated differently, after announcing your projected retirement, and that you're in a very specialized area. Then during your last week at work, be super nice to the manager, and let them know you'll be available as a consultant, if they need your help after you're gone .. then figure out a reasonable but high rate for it! Smiley Happy


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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 35 of 45

I must say I have witnessed this as others have retired. Management talks about succession planning but basically do nothing. It falls into the  "that is too hard" bucket and is largely ignored. It is only after the person is gone that people start saying, "I wished I had talked to XXXX about this." Alas, it's too late.  

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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 36 of 45

@nyadrn - I had a very perceptive boss many years ago, who talked about people & corporations having to address both immediate & long-term goals simultaneously, because if you only address the immediate needs, the long-term goals will probably never been important enough to address "now". Many companies just don't force themselves to spend at least some time, planning for the future!

 

When I was project managing the relocation of the entire engineering department, I had to identify/quantify all the people & their storage requirements first. I went thru one section several times, and never met the person working in one cubicle (with their name on it). The manager then told me that they'd retired 2 years earlier. Their cubicle was like an untouched "shrine"; they'd never had the person & supervisor go thru all their lower priority projects, and reassign them & move all the records to current employees. After 2 years, no one knew half of what was still sitting around in that cubicle!


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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 37 of 45

@ASTRAEA wrote:

@BearonaBicycle - Don't feel too guilty! One of the most important thing any supervisor/manager needs to do - whether it's a corporation, small office, or even a non-profit/volunteer operation - is SUCCESSION PLANNING. Few are good at it or even bother, so if/when they get caught with their pants down, the only ones to blame are management who didn't train/plan ahead.


You know, I work for a large global company with tons of employees and many have retired in the past few years..  and it is amazing how little concern anyone shows about talking with the people who are leaving and picking their brains about what and how they work.  We have seen several long time key people leave and a total unorganized mess afterwards with no one knowing how and what to do with many parts of their jobs.  It is just astounding how little anyone cares to get prepared.  They actually do not want anyone to sit with these people..  althought the other employees do ! 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 38 of 45

@BearonaBicycle - Don't feel too guilty! One of the most important thing any supervisor/manager needs to do - whether it's a corporation, small office, or even a non-profit/volunteer operation - is SUCCESSION PLANNING. Few are good at it or even bother, so if/when they get caught with their pants down, the only ones to blame are management who didn't train/plan ahead.


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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 39 of 45

I do work in a large corporate IT shop. With 40 years in large corporate IT, 10 year with this employer, I definitely have seen that the employer is almost always looking out for themselves and not the employee. A little too late now, I realize that it would have been best to keep retirement plans close to my chest until my deadline to announce which is 09/01.

 

I very much respect my employer and boss. I have a very specialize job that will be very difficult to fill. After seeing a pattern these recent years of extreme difficulty in hiring IT specialists, I want give my boss sufficient time to fill my position. I have suffered from the times when the departing employee left those remaining having to carry the load.

 

Tom

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Re: Final Year Pre-retirement

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Message 40 of 45

My employer requires a 6 month notice. That would be September 1 for me.. 

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