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Impact Of Inherited Proceeds from Estate On SSDI and Medicaid In Texas

We recently lost our youngest sister to metastatic breast cancer and she left all of her personal assets, both monetary and physical assets such as home, land, jewelry, part ownership in a small restaurant she opened, etc. to our youngest brother who is 52 yerars old. He currently lives on monthly SSDI benefits and is physically unable to work. It seems in my research that "inherited" proceeds from a source including an estate will not effect his ability to continue receiving his monthly SSDI benefits. Am I correct in understanding this or will him receiving these proceeds as beneficiary adversely effect his monthly benefits?

 

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@wpollock wrote:
. . . . . she left all of her personal assets, both monetary and physical assets such as home, land, jewelry, part ownership in a small restaurant she opened, etc. to our youngest brother who is 52 yerars old.

He currently lives on monthly SSDI benefits and is physically unable to work.

It seems in my research that "inherited" proceeds from a source including an estate will not effect his ability to continue receiving his monthly SSDI benefits. Am I correct in understanding this or will him receiving these proceeds as beneficiary adversely effect his monthly benefits?

 

Thank you for any replies


If this brother is, in fact, receiving Social Security Disability Insurance (SSDI) based on a work record - most likely, his own - there will NOT be any consequesnces for any accumulated assets.

 

Social Security Administration.gov: Overview of our disability programs 

from the above link ~

SSDI provides benefits to disabled or blind persons who are “insured” by workers’ contributions to the Social Security trust fund. These contributions are based on your earnings (or those of your spouse or parents) as required by the Federal Insurance Contributions Act (FICA). Title II of the Social Security Act authorizes SSDI benefits. Your dependents may also be eligible for benefits from your earnings record.

 

Just make sure this (SSDI) is the benefit which he is receiving -  and that he is NOT receiving SSI, which is Supplemental Security Income.

 

from the same link as above ~

The SSI program makes cash assistance payments to aged, blind, and disabled persons (including children) who have limited income and resources. The Federal Government funds SSI from general tax revenues. Many states pay a supplemental benefit to persons in addition to their Federal benefits. Some of these states have made arrangements with us to combine their supplemental payment with our Federal SSI payment into one monthly check to you. Other states manage their own programs and make their payments separately. Title XVI of the Social Security Act authorizes SSI benefits.

 

SSDI is based on work record contributions into the Social Security program.  You can have any amount of assets or net worth as long as contributions were made and you were vested into the program, meaning that you worked long enough to qualify for these SS benefits

 

SSI is a charitable or social welfare program for those who never worked or didn't work long enough to qualify for the work based Social Security program.  Under this program, you have to qualify as disabled with lower income and few if any assets.

It's Always Something . . . . Roseanna Roseannadanna
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