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WHAT'S SPECIAL ABOUT TODAY?

Today is March 24th and it is:

World Tuberculosis Day

 

World Tuberculosis Day is a worldwide event that aims to raise public awareness about tuberculosis and the efforts made to prevent and treat this disease. This event is held on March 24 each year and is promoted by organizations such as the World Health Organization (WHO).

 

March 24th marks the day in 1882 when Dr. Robert Koch detected the cause of tuberculosis--the TB bacillus. This was a first step towards diagnosing and curing tuberculosis. World Tuberculosis Day can be traced back to 1982, when the International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease launched World TB Day on March 24 that year, to coincide with the 100th anniversary of Dr. Koch’s discovery.

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I plan on posting interesting tidbits about each day/date of the calendar.  I hope others will add to it as well.  It can be related to any subject as long as it happened on or is correlated in some way with that particular date.

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Groundhog handler John Griffiths holds Punxsutawney Phil, who did not see his shadow, predicting an early or late spring during the 134th annual Groundhog Day festivities on February 2, 2020 in Punxsutawney, Pennsylvania.

 

It's..................

Image result for happy groundhog day

And since the little runt didn't see his shadow today, we will be blessed with six more weeks of winter.  Or so the story goes!

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  • Super Bowl Sunday – February 2, 2020
 
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 Is the first Sunday in February (February 2), America’s love affair with football springs into full bloom. After 16 hard-fought matches spanning 17 weeks, the two best football teams in the NFL battle their way to a world championship in the grandest TV spectacle in America.

But over the past 51 years, the Super Bowl has evolved into much more than a championship football game. It is a cultural phenomenon that nearly a third of Americans anticipate the whole year round, each for his or her own reasons: the spicy chicken wings, the hearty chili, the ice cold beer, the rowdy friends, the big-budget commercials, the spectacular halftime show, and last but not least, the football. So crack open a cold one, settle down on the couch, and flip on the TV—it’s Super Bowl Sunday!

Super Bowl Sunday - Survey Results

Survey according to one of the top New York PR Firms:

 

Super Bowl Sunday Activities
  1. Host a Super Bowl party

    Want to guarantee that you'll have friends for at least the next year? Host a Super Bowl party. It's a good excuse to bring together all your friends, and we mean all—including friends of friends of friends who you've only met once. The bigger the crowd, the more fun you'll have screaming at the TV together.

  2. Have a halftime show marathon

    The Super Bowl halftime show is a who's who of the hottest and most influential musicians of the year. Travel back in time to watch some of the most iconic halftime performances of all time, and get a glimpse of what music was capturing America's heart in years past. We recommend performances by Beyonce in 2013, Bruce Springsteen in 2009, Prince in 2007, Janet Jackson in 2004, U2 in 2002, and Michael Jackson in 1993.

  3. Gorge on chicken wings

    Get this: America eats approximately 1.25 billion chicken wings during the Super Bowl. As the veritable mascot of the Super Bowl, chicken wings are as important to this holiday as turkey is to Thanksgiving. Don't forget to stock up on napkins!

Why We Love Super Bowl Sunday
  1. It's the great unifier

    On Super Bowl Sunday, Americans from all walks of life gather together on their collective couch for four hours of focused concentration... on their TVs. Over 100 million Americans are watching the Super Bowl at any given moment. That's over 31% of the U.S. population!

  2. It's not actually about football at all

    Not a football fan? Not to worry. The Super Bowl may center around a football game, but it's not actually about the sport itself—it's about the company, the commercials, and most of all, the food. Plus, the halftime show just might be the pop culture event of the year. You might even get to witness a wardrobe malfunction!

  3. Food, food, food

    After Thanksgiving, Super Bowl Sunday is the second-largest day for food consumption in the U.S. Pizza deliveries account for 60% of all food take-out orders, while other indispensable favorites include chicken wings and potato chips. If that's not a reason to show up to the party, we don't know what is.

     

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National Croissant Day – January 30, 2020
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January 9, 2020 – NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT APPRECIATION DAY 10671365_10152766130186979_5784524069847892403_n.jpg

 

Across the country on January 9th each year, citizens take the lead to show support on National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day. 

Law Enforcement Officers of every rank and file have chosen a profession that puts their life on the line every day for their communities.  They’ve answered a call to public service that is demanding and often unappreciated.

From local, state and federal, their duties command dedication. The jobs are often thankless and take them away from their families for long hours. Rarely do they know what their days have in store for them. Often law enforcement are the only paid emergency resource a community has. More often they work in coordination with other local, state, and federal organizations to make communities safer.

On National Law Enforcement Day, we have an opportunity to thank them for their service and offer a token of respect.

 

#LawEnforcementAppreciationDay

There are several ways to show your support. Send a note of thanks to your local, county or state police agency. Wear blue, turn your social media channels blue or shine a blue porch light to show your support. Find more ideas at Concerns of Police Survivors and share your support using #LawEnforcementAppreciationDay to share on social media.  

NATIONAL LAW ENFORCEMENT APPRECIATION DAY HISTORY

Several organizations came together to create National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day in 2015 to thank officers across the country for all the daily sacrifices they make for their communities. Some of the organizations supporting the observance include:

  • Concerns of Police Survivors
  • FBI National Academy Associates
  • Fraternal Order of Police
  • International Association of Chief of Police
  • Officer Down Memorial Page
  • Law Enforcement United
  • National Law Enforcement Officers Memorial Fund
  • International Conference of Police Chaplains
  • National Troopers Coalition

Since then the inaugural celebration, nationwide many more organizations have joined forces to support National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day (L.E.A.D.) to spread encouragement and respect to these dedicated men and women.

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Thanks, Dave!

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Did you know that today is...
National Bagel Day – January 15, 2020
 
What is National Bagel Day?

National Bagel Day is January 15. Bagels have a history that is richer than your favorite cream cheese spread! These rounds of dough can be found just about anywhere: breakfast joints, coffee shops, supermarkets, or even your kitchen pantry. In fact, 2018 saw more than 354 million bagels sold. 

National Bagel Day History
Bagels have a long and highly documented history that travels from the Jewish families of Poland in the 1600s to wrapped up in parchment paper in your hands today. And, unlike many things created nearly five-hundred years ago, bagels are remarkably unchanged. Sure, cream cheeses and butters and flavors and toppings may have evolved over time but bagel is a beigel is a beygal
 
Bagels made the jump to America with a massive Polish-Jewish immigration in the 1800s that firmly entrenched itself in New York City where it thrived. In fact, an entire union was created in the early 1900s called Bagel Bakers Local 338 to support the growing, immigrant-led industry. That also begat the “bagel brunch,” that we still enjoy to this day with little to no changes: lox, cream cheese, capers, tomatoes, and red onions. 
 
While bagels were hugely popular in New York City almost immediately, they didn’t make their way to the national scale until the mid 20th-century where automation and bread slicing (the coolest thing!) made mass manufacturing much more efficient. Since then, bagels have taken off to include a variety of flours, toppings, dips and smears but still remain – by and large – exactly as they were in the 1600s. 
 
National Bagel Day timeline
1950s Bagels Become An American Staple

Bagels are sold in supermarkets across the nation and surpass the donut as an essential breakfast item.

Early 1900's New York Icon

Over this century, the popularity of bagels spread through the growing Eastern European and Jewish-immigrant communities in New York City.

1610 New Baby, New Bagel

The first known written records about bagels appears in Krakow, Poland which dictated that bagels should be gifted to women soon after childbirth.

1300s The First Bagel Appears

The beginnings of the modern bagel can be traced to the Polish obwarzanek, a thin, boiled, then baked ring of dough.

Traditions of National Bagel Day
Eat a bagel
Pretty easy! Head to your local bakery and take a big ole bite into a yummy, warm, crispy, doughy, bagel with your favorite toppings!
 
Bake a bagel
Surprisingly simple and rather enjoyable, there’s nothing that tastes or smells better than freshly baked bagels straight out of the oven. A great activity for you and your loved ones. 
 
Give a bagel
Considering that the initial written context of bagels came as a traditional gift for pregnant women, this will go great at any maternity ward! Or, just give it to someone you know who lives bagels. 
 
National Bagel Day FAQs
When is National Bagel Day?
National Bagel Day is every year on January 15. 
 
Should I eat a bagel on National Bagel Day?
We recommend eating bagels as often as possible, but especially so on National Bagel Day. 
 
What's the difference between a bagel and a donut?
Bagels are actually a type of bread, which is different than a donut, which is a type of fried dough. 
 
National Bagel Day Activities
  1. Have a bagel at every meal

    Take this day as an opportunity to appreciate the versatility of the bagel, and feel free to use it as an excuse to try as many flavors as you would like!

  2. Share the bagel love

    What office, classroom, or group of friends doesn't love bagels? Scope out your local bagel shops for exclusive National Bagel Day deals and spring for a dozen delicious bagels to share.

  3. Find the best bagel in town

    Everyone has their favorite bagel place, so maybe it's time to figure out which one is the best. Maybe each place has its own specialty bagel — be adventurous and try it out!

Why We Love National Bagel Day
  1. There are countless varieties

    Have you ever walked into a bagel shop and noticed all the different flavors available? From bagels weaved with cinnamon raisin swirl to the classic everything bagel, there is always a variety to satisfy your sweet or savory cravings.

  2. Bagels are versatile

    Many of us have had bagels for breakfast, but how about as a deli sandwich or maybe a pizza bagel? The chewy and dense texture make bagels a perfect vehicle for toppings, spreads, anything else delicious you can think of!

  3. They are convenient

    You can find bagels at grocery stores, coffee shops, and even gas stations. You can eat them toasted or just plain. Either way, they are still a delicious and easy choice when you are on-the-go.

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NATIONAL WHIPPED CREAM DAY

On January 5, add a little extra something special to desserts to celebrate National Whipped Cream Day.  Add whipped cream! Not only does it add creaminess and a bit of pizzaz, but it also makes the difference between the ho-hum or a celebration kind of beverage or dessert. 

This holiday falls on the birthday of Reddi-Wip founder Aaron “Bunny” Lapin (January 5, 1914 – July 10, 1999). Lapin invented Reddi-Wip in 1948, and the holiday celebrates whipped cream’s contributions to the dessert world. 

While most often sweetened and flavored with vanilla, whipped cream dresses up desserts with other flavors, too. With a hint of coffee or chocolate or the zing of orange or mint, whipped cream adds a delightfulness to pies, cakes, and beverages.  We call it by other names, too, such as Chantilly cream or creme Chantilly, milk snow or snow cream. 

Recipes from the 16th century included whipped cream sweetened and aromatized. In these recipes, naturally separated cream is whipped, typically with willow or rush branches, then the resulting foam on the surface would from time to time be skimmed off and drained, which was a process taking an hour or more.

The English name whipped cream found its beginning in 1673. The name snow cream continued to be used throughout the 17th century.

HOW TO OBSERVE #WhippedCreamDay

Try one of the following recipes:

Whipped Cream
Sturdy Whipped Cream Frosting
Caramelito Cookies with Vanilla Whipped Cream and Candied Nuts
Milk Chocolate Mousse with Coconut Whipped Cream

Use #WhippedCreamDay to post on social media.

NATIONAL WHIPPED CREAM DAY HISTORY

While the day is celebrated on Reddi-Wip founder, Aaron “Buddy” Lapin’s birthday, National Day Calendar continues seeking information on the founders of the day. The country has observed the day since at least 1984 according to an article published in The Philadelphia Inquirer on December 30 of that year written by Susan Dundon.

Interestingly, a horse named King Of Peru won the National Whipped Cream Day claiming stakes race on January 5, 2001. Every horse in a claiming stakes race is up for sale.

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Well What is Special about January 2, 2020 is ...

  • 2nd day of the year. There are then 364 days left in 2020.
  • 1st Thursday of 2020.
  • on the 1st week of 2020 (using US standard week number calculation).
  • 12th day of Winter. There are 78 days left till Spring.
  • Birthstone for this day: Garnet
January 2, Zodiac Sign
Zodiac
Capricorn
 
January 2, 2020 United States Holidays & Popular Observances
  • January 2, is the 9th of the 12 days of the Christmas Season (Twelvetide).
 
January 2, 2020 Popular Holidays & Observances Worldwide
 
  • Public Holiday - New Zealand
  • Bank Holiday - Canada
  • Berchtold Day (Berchtoldstag) - Switzerland
  • Guru Govind Singh Jayanti (गुरु गोबिंद सिंह जयंती) - India
  • New Year Day Holiday - Cuba, Moldova, Romania & Serbia
  • Scotland: New Year's Holiday - United Kingdom
  • Black and White Carnival (Carnaval de Negros y Blancos Comienza) - Colombia
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NATIONAL PUMPKIN PIE DAY

On December 25th, National Pumpkin Pie Day dishes up the slice many Americans are looking for around the dinner table. As they enjoy time with family or friends, they also take the opportunity to honor the ever-humble and often favored pumpkin pie. 

Often eaten during the fall and winter months and invited to Thanksgiving and Christmas tables, in the United States, pumpkin pie is a traditional dessert. The pumpkin itself is a symbol of harvest.

To make a pumpkin pie, the pulp of the pumpkin is mixed with eggs, evaporated and/or sweetened condensed milk, and sugar and is typically flavored with nutmeg, cinnamon, cloves and ginger. 

 

Pumpkin pie recipes were found in seventeenth-century English cookbooks, such as Hannah Woolley’s 1675, The Gentlewoman’s Companion.  A century later, pumpkin pie recipes began to appear in American cookbooks.

Pumpkin pie became a familiar addition to the Thanksgiving dinner in the early seventeenth century when the pilgrims brought it back to New England. Initially, the pumpkin pie was prepared by stuffing the pumpkin with apples, spices, and sugar, then baking it whole.

Many seasonal pumpkin pie flavored products fill the grocery store shelves. We find the flavor in ice cream, pudding, coffee, lattes, cheesecake, pancakes, candy, and even beer. All season long, advertisers pitch pumpkin in their seasonal drinks and scents.

Candles, diffusers, and waxes promise to fill our homes pumpkin pie scent. Before long, our homes smell like a bakery. Some of us haven’t turned on the oven since June. 

The pie brings back such fond memories, too. Writers and poets include pumpkin pie in their seasonal poems, songs, and stories.The 1844 Thanksgiving poem, “Over the River and Through the Wood,” written by Lydia Maria Child, references pumpkin pie in one of its verses: “Hurrah for the fun! Is the pudding done? Hurrah for the pumpkin pie!”  Another familiar one is the song, “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” contains the lyric, “Later we’ll have some pumpkin pie, and we’ll do some caroling.”

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Giving Tuesday – December 3, 2019


What is Giving Tuesday?
Every year, on the Tuesday after Thanksgiving, people take the time to kickoff the holiday season by giving back to their community. Whether it be donating money to a charitable cause or volunteering, Giving Tuesday is a day set to benefit the community. 

 

History of Giving Tuesday
The idea of Giving Tuesday was first announced in September 2012, two months prior to the first Giving Tuesday occurring on November 27. The announcement was made by Giving Tuesday founding partner and technology website, Mashable. The purpose of the day is to inspire people and companies to take action, just like Black Friday and Cyber Monday created a framework for retailers to sell merchandise. Other Giving Tuesday founders and partners include Skype, Cisco, Microsoft, Sony, Aldo, Case Foundation, Heifer International, Phoenix House, and Starwood Hotels. Shortly before and after November 27, 2012, Giving Tuesday was covered by Washington Post, the White House official blog, ABC News, and Huffington Post. Forbes also used the occasion to publish a guide on effective giving.

In 2013, Mashable partnered with Google+ to hold a “hangout-a-thon” for Giving Tuesday. The holiday received coverage in many philanthropy information websites, including the Chronicle of Philanthropy and Charity Navigator. The December 4 Chronicle of Philanthropy article highlighted a donation by Good Ventures to GiveDirectly, Google’s hangout-a-thon, and matching grants announced by the Case Foundation. Charitable giving on Giving Tuesday in 2013 was approximately twice the value in 2012, with over 7,000 participating nonprofits.

For the 2018 holiday occurrence, Facebook and PayPal announced they’d match up to $7 million in donations to United States nonprofits on a first come first serve basis. The match limit was hit after only an hour, with an announcement saying the match was achieved within seconds. A total of $125 million was raised via Facebook on Giving Tuesday, the highest for a single day on the platform.

Giving Tuesday Activities
Donate to your favorite charity
With an abundance of causes to support, there are many options for people to donate to charity. You can mail in a check, drop off some money, or even click 'Donate' from the comfort of your desk.

 

Volunteer
We sometimes forget that one helpful way of giving back is by volunteering. Contact a local hospital, shelter, or nonprofit ahead of time and see how you can help.

 

Donate clothes/shoes
That sweater you swore you would wear this fall (and never saw the daylight), can be of use to someone in need. Go through your closet and donate any articles of clothing you know you're not going to wear again (or ever).

 

Why We Love Giving Tuesday
It makes us feel good
Whether you admit it or not, the holiday season can get the best of us. Especially when our main stressors are what gift to get that certain family member. If we splurge on materialist goods, giving back to a charitable cause takes some of that guilt away.


We can help those in need
By volunteering at a local community center, or donating money to your favorite organization, we're are able to help those in need. You can provide a warm meal at the local soup kitchen, or even clean drinking water by donating $5.

 

Anyone can participate
You don't have to be rich or in the Peace Corps to participate in Giving Tuesday, every small act counts. Donating $1 can make a huge impact on any cause.

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National Christmas Lights Day – December 1, 2019

 

U.S.National Christmas Lights Day 2019 — December 1
Time to deck the halls, folks, because December 1 is National Christmas Lights Day! Before the invention of electric lights, families would balance candles on the branches of their Christmas trees—a risky practice that naturally led to several house fires. Electric Christmas lights were first invented in 1880 by Thomas Edison, who promptly strung them all over the outside of his Menlo Park laboratory. Because people were initially distrustful of electricity, however, it took another several decades for the invention to catch on. And it wasn’t until 1903, when General Electric began selling pre-assembled kits of Christmas lights, that electric lights became popular with people of all classes. Today, electric lights are an integral part of the winter holiday season, and certainly aren’t exclusive to Christmas. As we get ready for the end of the year, let’s string up our lights and celebrate. ‘Tis the season, after all.


National Christmas Lights Day Activities
Take a Christmas lights walk
Bundle up in your winter coat and take a walk through your neighborhood to enjoy the lights on display. Or, if there’s a place in your hometown that’s notorious for grandiose light displays, take a trip over there to check them out. It’s a great way to stay connected with your community, get exercise, and just enjoy the beauty of the winter season.


Coordinate with your neighbors
If you feel like putting on a big scene with your neighbors, you can collaborate on a specific design together. Whether it’s a repeated motif or an extended scene, this is a great way to exercise your creativity and have a great time with your neighbors. And as a bonus, you might end up going viral thanks to some passer-by with a smartphone.


Set your lights to music
This was a trend a few years ago, but we maintain that it’s still a classic Christmas project. If you’ve got the know-how (or know someone who does), you can set your lights to flash to the beat of your favorite song.

 

Why We Love National Christmas Lights Day
They’re beautiful
There’s something about the look of Christmas lights shining on a cold winter’s night that captures the imagination. You’re instantly transported back to your childhood, back when magic was real and life was a lot less complicated. Whether they shine against a blanket of snow or glimmer from the trunk of a palm tree, Christmas lights have their own special kind of beauty.


They keep you warm
Anyone who has ever singed their hand on a bulb that’s been burning too long knows this to be true. Sure, a roaring log fire might be a more efficient way to keep warm (or heck, even a furnace), but in case you don’t have either of those things, curl up next to a bright strand of Christmas lights and warm on up. (Just be careful not to touch them).


They make a great family puzzle
At some point during the months leading up to December, the Christmas lights will inevitably become tangled. It doesn’t matter how carefully you put them away the year before—they will always be tangled when you bring them out again. So rather than be miserable and grumpy about it, gather the family together and turn the Great Untangling into a game! Build up your hand-eye coordination and your strategic thinking skills as you get ready to “step into Christmas.”

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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World AIDS Day – December 1, 2019

 
WorldWorld AIDS Day 2019 — December 1

First recognized in 1988, World AIDS Day falls on December 1 each year. World AIDS Day is dedicated to spreading awareness of the AIDS pandemic spread by the spread of HIV infection, and to mourning those who have died of the disease. An estimated 40 million people worldwide have died of AIDS since 1981, and an estimated 37 million are living with HIV, making it one of the most important global public health issues in recorded history. Despite recent improvements in treatment, the AIDS epidemic still claims an estimated two million lives each year, of which more than 250,000 are children.


World AIDS Day timeline
2013
"A Functional Cure"
12 of 75 people treated in a French study were “functionally cured” of HIV, not experiencing a return of the virus even after stopping antiretroviral therapy
1987
First Antiretrival Drugs
AZT (zidovudine) is the first drug available to treat HIV.
1986
1M Americans Impacted
Accordingto reporting in “The New York Times”
1981
U.S. Recognition
The U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports on AIDS for the first time
1920s
A Pandemic Surfaces
The HIV-1 strain of virus emerged to circulate in Kinshasa, closely related to a virus found in chimpanzees


How to Observe World AIDS Day
Wear a red ribbon
Wearing a red ribbon in your lapel is the most broadly recognized way of showing your support on World AIDS Day. Red symbolizes blood, and the pain caused by the disease, anger about global inaction to fight the epidemic, a warning to take the disease seriously, and a symbol of love, passion, and tolerance towards those affected by the disease. Check online to find a ribbon supplier that supports a charitable cause.


Donate to an AIDS charity
There are a host of national and international nonprofits devoted to fighting the disease and problems associated with its spread. Check online and consider whether you’d like to support an organization in the United States, where deaths have been declining since the mid 1990s but infection continues to affect thousands of people each year, or perhaps an organization focused on infection in Sub-Saharan Africa, where Adult HIV Prevalence has reached 1 in 20 people and 1.2 million people die of HIV/AIDS each year.


Attend a candlelight vigil
Most major cities in the US host candlelight vigils on World AIDS Day as a way of visually commemorating those lost to the disease and vowing to fight it in the future. Check online to find a vigil near you and head along to show your support. Don’t forget to share your experience on social media to ensure that the idea is brought to the front of mind for your friends, and to demonstrate your support.


Why World AIDS Day is Important
AIDS impacts everyone
In its early years, some criticized World AIDS Day for focusing on children and young people, but organizers aimed to alleviate some of the stigma surrounding the disease as primarily affecting gay men, boosting recognition of it as a family disease. HIV/AIDS is the leading cause of death among women of reproductive age,globally,and of 1.8 million new HIV infections in 2016, 43 percent were among women.


Getting to zero
Since 2012, the multi-year theme for World AIDS Day has been achieving zero new HIV infections, zero deaths from AIDS-related illnesses, and zero discrimination. In 2016, new infections among young women aged 15 to 24 were 44% higher than they were among men in the same age group, which suggests the high profile AIDS-related deaths of male celebrities such as Freddie Mercury, Robert Mapplethorpe and Rock Hudson have continued to overshadow realities of new infection rates amongst women in the public imagination. World AIDS Day seeks to challenge those perceptions and protect everyone.


Equalizing access to treatment
Research shows that stigma associated with sex work and LGBT populations, internationally, is a growing factor in unequal access to effective treatment. International AIDS funding began to fall for the first time in 2015, but still, less than half of those suffering with HIV/AIDS have access to anti-retroviral treatment across the world. It’s never been more important to draw attention the inequalities in treatment, in order to stop its spread once and for all.

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National French Toast Day – November 28, 2019
 
What is National French Toast Day?
No need to wonder about what to make for breakfast on November 28 — it’s National French Toast Day. You know — that thick, sweet, savory dish that’s become a staple of the American breakfast diet. Just writing about this topic has us thinking about heading out for a late breakfast. That’s why we’re so jazzed about National French Toast Day — which, in 2019, falls on the same day as Thanksgiving. French Turkey Toast, anyone?
National French Toast Day history
Here’s the first thing you need to know: The French do not call this French toast. It’s called “pain perdu,” or “lost bread,” because you can literally use stale bread to make it. (Most Americans, however, might find that objectionable.)

French toast, according to Frenchly, comes from a desire to not waste food. Also, please note that it’s a major faux pas to throw bread way. (Bread has religious meaning.) Most experts agree that French toast dates back to ancient Rome. A similar recipe can be found in the book of Apicius from the 5th century BC. The Romans dipped slices of bread in milk (and sometimes eggs) before frying them, and called it “Pan Dulcis.”

Fast forward to the 1400s and you’ll find a similar recipe at the court of Henri V where the “lost bread” attracted many fans. Still, it wasn’t until the mid 17th century that the term “French Toast” appeared in England. Food historians believe the term “French” does not even mean France; instead, it refers to the verb “to French” which means “to slice” in Old Irish.

So, “French toast” is actually “sliced toast.”

Irish settlers traveling to the U.S. and Canada may have brought the term with them. The phrase “French toast” first appeared in The Encyclopedia of American Food and Drink in 1871. However, similar recipes were also called “Egg toast,” “Spanish toast,” and even “German toast.”

There’s another less exotic theory. French toast may have been called “French” because it enabled chefs to inflate the price. “Traditionally in the United States, we have an admiration for French cuisine, which we consider elaborate and gastronomic,” says Kitchen Project Editor-in-Chief Stephen Block. “And that’s probably why this dish was named that way. It’s just marketing. There’s no chance that ‘Lost Bread’ could have worked. And since the dish was successful and the recipe was easy, the name spread.”
 
 
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Yes, today is THANKSGIVING DAY!  However and contrarily, today is also....

National Day of Mourning – November 28, 2019
 
 
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Of course, we all know today is.....

Thanksgiving 2019 – November 28, 2019
 
America’s Thanksgiving holiday, born in the 1500s, mythologized in 1621, and observed even during the bleakest hours of the Civil War, now stands as one of the nation’s most anticipated and beloved days — celebrated each year on the fourth Thursday in November (November 28, 2019). Perhaps no other nonsectarian holiday has more tradition. Family, friends, food, and football have come to symbolize Thanksgiving — a rare celebratory holiday without an established gift-giving component. Instead the day urges all of us to be grateful for things we do have.
History of Thanksgiving
This story doesn’t necessarily start with Pilgrims. 
 
Evidence shows that Spanish explorers and settlers held thanksgiving services during the late 1500s in what is now Florida and New Mexico. Thanksgivings also took place in what became the Commonwealth of Virginia as early as 1607, with the first permanent settlement of Jamestown holding a thanksgiving in 1610.
 
The ‘First’ Thanksgiving
 
It wasn’t until a decade later that the Plymouth settlers, known as Pilgrims, arrived in the New World. They celebrated at Plymouth for three days after their first harvest in 1621. The gathering included 50 people who were on the Mayflower (all who remained of the 100 who had landed) and 90 Native Americans. The feast was cooked by the four adult Pilgrim women who survived their first winter in the New World, along with young daughters and other servants.   
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TODAY IS...

National Cake Day – November 26, 2019
 

For 2019, National Cake Day is on Tuesday, November 26. We believe Marie Antoinette said it best when she (allegedly) said “let them eat cake!”

We’re not sure the peasants of 18th century France were too fond of the sentiment but nevertheless we’ll take her advice do just that! 

What is National Cake Day?
Can’t wait for your birthday? Remember, National Cake Day falls on November 26. No one really knows how this holiday came about, but we all know that we all love to eat cake.

National Cake Day History
The term “cake” has a rather complicated history. The word itself is of Viking origin, from the Old Norse word “kaka.”
It’s All Greek to Me!
The ancient Greeks called cake “plakous,” which was derived from the word for “flat.” The simple ingredients include flour mixed with eggs, milk, nuts, and honey. They also had a cake called “satura,” which was a flat heavy cake. During the Roman period, the name for cake became “placenta,” which was derived from the Greek term. A placenta was baked on a pastry base or inside a pastry case.

National Cake Day Activities


Bake a cake
The most obvious and fun way to celebrate National Cake Day is by putting on an apron (or not if you wish to get flour all over your clothes), and preheat your oven! You can make one from scratch or use a little help from little box at the store.


Invite your friends over for a cake decorating contest
You provide the base and they provide the creativity. Invite your friends over for a night full of frosting and laughs, and judge the cakes by the best, worst, and most creative designs.


Let them eat cake (at work)
Everyone loves a nice treat at work. Surprise your co-workers by bringing in a homemade or store-bought cake. When people ask what the occasion is, the answer is simple, "It's National Cake Day, duh!"

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International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women – November 25, 2019
 
On November 25, 1960, the Mirabal sisters of the Dominican Republic were assassinated by henchmen of dictator Rafael Trujillo. The sisters, who had been active in movements against the Trujillo regime, were beaten and strangled to death, then placed in a Jeep that was driven off a mountainous road in order to make their deaths appear accidental. In December 1999, the United Nations General Assembly designated November 25 as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women. The date marks the beginning of 16 days of remembrance and activism, culminating in International Human Rights Day.

According to a report by the United Nations, 19 percent of women between the ages of 15 and 49 years of age have experienced physical and/or sexual violence “by an intimate partner.” In some cases, this violence ends in the women’s death.

International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women timeline
December 17, 1999 The Day Becomes Official

A United Nations resolution establishes November 25 as the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

1981 The Date is Saved

Women attending the Latin American and Caribbean Feminist Encuentros mark November 25 as a day to raise awareness of violence against women.

November 25, 1961 Mirabal sisters Assassinated

Three female Dominican political activists are assassinated. This is the event that will eventually inspire the International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women.

How to Observe International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women
  1. Join the movement

    There are a lot of things you can do to keep the momentum going — from learning the facts about violence against women to organizing meetings, teach-ins and marches to express your support and solidarity.

  2. #OrangeTheWorld

    Share photos, messages and videos showing how you "orange the world" alongside other women worldwide. It's all part of a campaign organized by UN Women, the United Nations organization that dedicates itself to gender equality and the continuing empowerment of women.

  3. Write an op-ed

    Most local newspapers are happy to accept opinion pieces from readers. Write an op-ed alerting others to the existence of the International Day for the Elimination of Violence against Women.

     

    5 Facts About Violence Against Women
    1. It's an epidemic

      An estimated 35 percent of women worldwide have been physically and/or sexually assaulted by a nonpartner.

    2. It's up close and personal

      Some studies show that up to 70 percent of women have experienced violence from an intimate partner.

    3. It's spreading

      Women and girls account for 71 percent of all human trafficking victims.

    4. The numbers are staggering

      More than 1 in 10 females have experienced forced sexual acts in their lives.

    5. Times are changing

      At least 140 countries have laws against domestic violence and sexual harassment.

    Why International Day for the Elimination of Violence Against Women is Important
    1. It raises awareness

      Every second of every day, women around the world are subjected to violence. Observing this day provides us with the space to recognize the problem and to start taking steps to reduce and, hopefully, eliminate it.

    2. It inspires action

      This day is not only a chance to raise awareness but to create an atmosphere in which women and men can organize together and take direct action to combat the epidemic of violence against women.

    3. It makes the future bright

      Only when women are free from the fear of brutality can we start to create a future in which every person is treated with respect and dignity.

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The Great American Smokeout!  November 21, 2019
 
The American Cancer Society sponsors the Great American Smokeout on the third Thursday of November (November 21, 2019), challenging smokers to give up cigarettes for 24 hours. If you or a loved one smokes cigarettes, consider joining the movement, and take the first step toward quitting cigarettes forever!
History of Great American Smokeout
The inception of the Great American Smokeout stems from a 1970 event in Randolph, Massachusetts. High school guidance councilor Arthur P. Mullaney asked people to give up cigarettes for one day and donate the money they would have spent on buying cigarettes to a high school scholarship fund. A few years later in 1974, newspaper editor Lynn R. Smith led Minnesota’s first Don’t Smoke Day. The two efforts caught on and on November 18, 1976, the California Division of the American Cancer Society got 1 million people to quit smoking for the day. This marked the first official Smokeout before the American Cancer Society took it nationwide in 1977. As a result, there was a dramatic change in the public view of tobacco advertising and use. Many public establishments and work places are now smoke-free to protect non-smokers and support people trying to quit. 
 
Every year the Great American Smokeout draws attention to preventing deaths and chronic illnesses caused by smoking. From the late 1980s to the 1990s, many state and local governments have raised taxes on cigarettes, limited promotions, discouraged teen cigarette use, and taken further action to counter smoking. States with strong tobacco control laws saw up to a 42% decrease of smoking in adults.
 
Though smoking rates have dropped, almost 38 million Americans still smoke tobacco, and about half of all smokers will encounter smoking related deaths. Each year, more than 480,000 people in the United States die from a smoking related illness, meaning smoking causes 1 out of 5 deaths in the US alone.
 
How to Observe Great American Smokeout
  1. Make a plan

    Learn about options to curb cravings and get your support system ready to help you through hard times. If you're trying to help someone else quit, check out some ways to ensure you're doing it the right way.

  2. Get rid of anything smoking-related

    It's the perfect day to remove all smoking-related items from your home. Remove all cigarettes, ashtrays, and lighters from your car and workplace as well. Also consider stocking up on substitutes like gum and crunchy snacks.

  3. Reflect on your smoking past

    If you've tried to quit before, the Great American Smokeout is a good time to reflect on your past attempts. Think about why those attempts didn't work, and go back to the drawing board for the next time around. 

4 Famous Ex-Smokers You Never Knew Smoked At All
  1. Gwyneth Paltrow

    The Academy Award-winning actress smoked frequently as a teen and didn't decide to quit until she was pregnant with her first child.

  2. ​Barack Obama

    The former president quit with the help of Nicorette ​gum, hoping to set a good example for his daughters.

  3. ​Jennifer Aniston

    The "Friends" star quit smoking successfully by turning to yoga and other exercise to keep her mind off of cigarettes.

  4. ​Mila Kunis

    The actress admitted she used cigarettes as a way to slim down for her role in "Black Swan," but has since given up the habit.​

Why Great American Smokeout is Important
  1. A single day can help people take the first step

    The Great American Smokeout highlights the dangers of smoking tobacco and provides a meaningful way for people to avoid cigarettes. It also offers a comfortable environment for family members and friends to speak about tobacco and how to quit smoking.

  2. It brings people together

    Not only does the Great American Smokeout speak to the negative effects of smoking, but it also helps people come together in the name of quitting. People trying to quit can communicate with one another online using the hashtag #GreatAmericanSmokeout, or by attending local events in various cities.

  3. It provides resources to quit

    The American Cancer Society's Great American Smokeout website provides resources, news, and stories about the journey to quit smoking. Smokers can find inspiration and tips to increase their chances of quitting successfully.

 
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Mickey Mouse’s Birthday – November 18, 2019
 

It must be fun to celebrate your birthday when you never age! Mickey Mouse first appeared in the short film “Steamboat Willy” on November 28, 1928. Ever since then, fans all over the world have celebrated this day as his birthday. Mickey reminds us of the magic of childhood — a time when dreams had wings, and our imagination made everything possible. Besides, everyone loves Mickey!

Mickey Mouse’s Birthday timeline 2004 Mickey Goes CGI

"Mickey's Twice Upon a Christmas" featured the character in CGI animation for the first time.

1993 Toontown!

Mickey's Toontown opened at Disneyland. The 1988 Disney film "Who Framed Roger Rabbit" inspired this new part of the Magic Kingdom. The area featured the "Mickey's House and Meet Mickey" attraction.

1987 Ear Force One

The first Mickey Mouse hot air balloon took flight.

1935 Mickey — in color

The first Mickey Mouse film in technicolor, "The Bad Concert," was released. This marked the end of Mickey's black and white era.

1928 From rabbit to mouse

Artist Ub Iwerks modified Oswald Rabbit — turning him into Mickey Mouse. Mickey's big-screen debut came in the feature film "Steamboat Willie."

How to Celebrate Mickey Mouse’s Birthday
  1. Put him on your wrist

    Mickey Mouse watches never seem to go out of style. There's even a 90th anniversary edition now available.

  2. Visit a Disney resort

    Enjoy music, fireworks, and special snacks as the parks stage a Mickey-themed party.

  3. Throw your own party

    How about a Mickey Mouse party for the kids where everyone gets to dress up like Mickey, Minnie, or another Disney character?

5 Things You Never Knew About Mickey Mouse
  1. He has a middle name

    Mickey's full name is Michael Theodore Mouse.

  2. The secret of this mouse's gloves

    Mickey Mouse wears white gloves so that his hands can be distinguished from his entire body.

  3. A friend to presidents

    Most U.S. presidents have posed alongside Mickey, with the notable exception of Lyndon Johnson.

  4. "Hot Dogs!"

    Those were the first words Mickey Mouse said. In fact, he was the first cartoon character to speak.

  5. Star power

    He is the first cartoon character to earn a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame

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A Brief History of Veterans Day

Veterans Day, formerly known as Armistice Day, was originally set as a U.S. legal holiday to honor the end of World War I, which officially took place on November 11, 1918. In legislation that was passed in 1938, November 11 was "dedicated to the cause of world peace and to be hereafter celebrated and known as 'Armistice Day.'" As such, this new legal holiday honored World War I veterans.

In 1954, after having been through both World War II and the Korean War, the 83rd U.S. Congress -- at the urging of the veterans service organizations -- amended the Act of 1938 by striking out the word "Armistice" and inserting the word "Veterans." With the approval of this legislation on June 1, 1954, Nov. 11 became a day to honor American veterans of all wars.

 

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In 1968, the Uniforms Holiday Bill ensured three-day weekends for federal employees by celebrating four national holidays on Mondays: Washington's Birthday, Memorial Day, Veterans Day, and Columbus Day. Under this bill, Veterans Day was moved to the fourth Monday of October. Many states did not agree with this decision and continued to celebrate the holiday on its original date. The first Veterans Day under the new law was observed with much confusion on Oct. 25, 1971.

 

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Finally on September 20, 1975, President Gerald R. Ford signed a law which returned the annual observance of Veterans Day to its original date of Nov. 11, beginning in 1978. Since then, the Veterans Day holiday has been observed on Nov. 11.

 

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Celebrating the Veterans Day Holiday

If the Nov. 11 holiday falls on a non-workday -- Saturday or Sunday -- the holiday is observed by the federal government on Monday (if the holiday falls on Sunday) or Friday (if the holiday falls on Saturday). Federal government closings are established by the U.S. Office of Personnel Management. State and local government closings are determined locally, and non- government businesses can close or remain open as they see fit, regardless of federal, state or local government operation determinations.

United States Senate Resolution 143, which was passed on Aug. 4, 2001, designated the week of Nov. 11 through Nov. 17, 2001, as "National Veterans Awareness Week." The resolution calls for educational efforts directed at elementary and secondary school students concerning the contributions and sacrifices of veterans.

 

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The difference between Veterans Day and Memorial Day

Memorial Day honors service members who died in service to their country or as a result of injuries incurred during battle. Deceased veterans are also remembered on Veterans Day but the day is set aside to thank and honor living veterans who served honorably in the military - in wartime or peacetime.

President Eisenhower's letter to Harvey V. Higley, Administrator of Veterans' Affairs, designating him Chairman, Veterans Day National Committee

The White House Office

October 8, 1954

Dear Mr. Higley:

I have today signed a proclamation calling upon all of our citizens to observe Thursday, November 11, 1954 as Veterans Day. It is my earnest hope that all veterans, their organizations, and the entire citizenry will join hands to insure proper and widespread observance of this day. With the thought that it will be most helpful to coordinate the planning, I am suggesting the formation of a Veterans Day National Committee. In view of your great personal interest as well as your official responsibilities, I have designated you to serve as Chairman. You may include in the Committee membership such other persons as you desire to select and I am requesting the heads of all departments and agencies of the Executive branch to assist the Committee in its work in every way possible.

I have every confidence that our Nation will respond wholeheartedly in the appropriate observance of Veterans Day, 1954.

Sincerely,

DWIGHT D. EISENHOWER

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National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day – November 7, 2019

National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day is an opportunity to celebrate the sumptuous combination of chocolate and almonds. Nearly 40 percent of all the world’s almonds end up in some form of chocolate, most often a candy bar. The pairing is one of the oldest known recipes using chocolate. While National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day, held on November 7, is sponsored by the National Confectioners Association, it’s primarily an online celebration involving dark chocolate and almond lovers.

National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day timeline 1938 Government endorsed chocolate

The federal government, recognizing the nutritional value of chocolate, added it to the meal rations for U.S. troops.

1925 Cocoa became big business

The U.S. Cocoa Exchange opened in New York City to facilitate cocoa transactions.

1920 Mounds bar born

Hershey's Mounds bar, made with almonds, coconut, and dark chocolate, hits the shelves.

1853 Cocoa tarries lifted

This made chocolate accessible to more than just the upper class.

1830 You can eat it

J.S. Fry and Sons, a British chocolate maker, devised a way to turn cocoa into a solid bar.

National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day Activities
  1. Dip it at home

    Buy a nice big bar of dark chocolate along with a jar of almonds to make your own dipped almonds at home. You might add a teaspoon or two of cornstarch to thicken the chocolate sauce. Sprinkle them with some sea salt to add extra flavor.

  2. Buy a dark chocolate and almond candy bar

    You have plenty to choose from! You've got Hershey's Special Dark with Almonds, or a Mounds bar, which includes shaved coconut (Mounds' sister bar, Almond Joy, features milk chocolate), or the Dove Silky Smooth Promises Dark Chocolate & Almond.

  3. Tour a chocolate factory

    The kids will love you for it! There's Hershey's in (the obviously named) Hershey, Pennsylvania. You can also hit the theme park next door. The Sanders and Morely Candy Makers chocolate factory in Clinton Township, Michigan offers a free tour, as does Hammond's Candies in Denver.

5 Reasons Why Chocolate's Healthier Than You Think
  1. Better fat

    Experiments on rats have shown that the fat in cocoa is actually less fattening than the fat in other fatty foods.

  2. Anti-inflammatory

    Research shows cocoa works as an anti-inflammatory agent in humans.

  3. Improved eyesight

    Consumption of cocoa thins the blood and improves circulation to the brain; it's thought to improve vision as a result.

  4. Good for your skin

    Dark chocolate, in particular, contains antioxidants that actually can improve the condition of your skin.

  5. Get your fiber

    Dark chocolate contains fiber and offers all of the health benefits that fiber brings, including satisfying your appetite.

Why We Love National Bittersweet Chocolate with Almonds Day
  1. It's a tasty combo

    The origins of combining dark chocolate and almonds are unknown, but whoever did it knew what they were doing. There's something about the taste and texture of almonds that just works alongside the bittersweet taste of dark chocolate.

  2. Believe it or not, it's healthy!

    While there's plenty of fat in dark chocolate-covered almonds, health benefits do exist when eaten in moderation. The antioxidants in dark chocolate, combined with the vitamins and proteins in almonds, offer a snack that can help reduce cardiovascular disease.

  3. Made in the USA

    The U.S. is the world's largest producer of almonds, and the majority of production happens in California. One Sacramento plant churns out more than two million pounds of almonds each day.

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National Candy Day – November 4, 2019
 
What is National Candy Day?

We hope your sweet tooth is ready, because November 4 is National Candy Day. These sweet and sour treats have been our favorite snack since childhood. Whether they’re hard, chewy, fruit flavored, or a “melt in your mouth not in your hand” sort of treat, candy has been a consistent source of happiness and, as we get older, nostalgia. 

National Candy Day History
The story of candy begins in India. Between the 6th and 4th centuries BC, the Persians and Greeks learned that the people in India had, what they called, reeds that make honey without bees. These reeds were actually sugarcane, which is indigenous to Southeast Asia. Ancient Indians would boil sugarcane juice, turning it into individual pieces of sugar, which they called “khanda.”
 
Before sugarcane was domesticated outside of Asia, honey was used in ancient China, the Middle East,  Egypt, Greece, and Rome to coat fruits and flowers, which would preserve them and turn them into a form of candy. Before the Industrial Revolution, candy was used as medicine to either calm the digestive system or cool the throat. In the Middle Ages, candy was mostly consumed by the wealthy and was made of sugar and spices to aid digestive problems, which were very common, as food was neither fresh nor balanced. 
 
Candy first came to America in the 18th century from France and Britain. Very few colonists were skilled in sugar work, meaning only the wealthy were able to enjoy these new treats. In the 1830s, when the Industrial Revolution was in full swing, technological advances allowed candy to be accessible to more than just the rich, including a new market specifically for children. While some artisan sugar workers remained, candy stores were becoming an American staple, especially in the lives of children across the country. Penny candy became the first thing a child would spend their money on, and candy store owners relied mostly on the business of children and families to keep them running. 
National Candy Day timeline 1817 Butterscotch

In a town called Doncaster in Yorkshire, England, a man named Samuel Parkinson began making butterscotch as a hard candy.

1883 Saltwater taffy

New Jersey shop owner David Bradley's candy store flooded due to a major storm. Because of this storm, he began calling his taffy "saltwater taffy."

1941 M&M's

M&M's were invented by Forrest Mars, who got the idea by watching soldiers eating chocolate pellets with a hard shell during the Spanish Civil War. The chocolates had hard shells so the soldiers could carry them during warm weather. 

1960 Starburst

Starburst candies were invented in the UK by Peter Phillips and were originally called Opal Fruits.

National Candy Day FAQs
Which holiday has the highest candy sales?

Halloween pulls in the most candy sales over any other holiday, as people load up on bags of sweets to pass out to eager trick-or-treaters.

When is National Candy Month?

National Candy Month occurs in June to celebrate over 100 years of candy and the impact its had on all of our lives. 

What is the most popular candy in the U.S?

Though the preferred candy tends to differ depending on the state, the two highest selling candies in the United States are M&M’s and Reese’s Peanut Butter Cups.

National Candy Day Activities
  1. Buy candy for a friend

    Give sweets to be sweet! Nothing says "Have a great day" better than a box of colorful candy.

  2. Make your own

    How about making your own candy for a change? Candy is made by boiling sugar in water or milk until it starts to caramelize. Find a recipe that strikes your interest and make it at home!

  3. Try something new

    We all have our go-to candies, but next time you're at the shop, try the candy you always look at but never actually pick up. It might be a new favorite.

Why We Love National Candy Day
  1. It's delicious

    If you've never had a king-sized Kit Kat bar or pack of Sour Patch Kids, then you haven't lived. Candy is great. End of story.

  2. Childhood nostalgia

    From crushing piñatas at birthday parties, to passing out Hershey's Kisses for Valentine's day, candy was a big part of our childhoods. No matter how much we grow, candy will always bring back those special memories.

  3. It's improves your mood

    Happy? Sad? It doesn't matter! Candy is used by many people as a way to boost happiness. It has a natural knack for lifting our moods.

 

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National Retirement Security Week – October 20-26, 2019
 
National Retirement Security Week - History September 13, 2006 The Senate passes the resolution

By unanimous consent, the Senate votes to designate the third week in October as National Retirement Security Week.

August 3, 2006 National Retirement Security Week is proposed

U.S. Senators Gordon Smith (R-OR) and Kent Conrad (D-ND) introduce a resolution to establish the weeklong observation.

How to Observe National Retirement Security Week
  1. Start saving money

    Ubiquity Retirement + Savings discovered that 32% of Americans didn’t start saving until they were in their 30s, and another 13% waited until their 40s to prepare for retirement. Don't wait any longer, start saving now.

  2. Speak with a retirement plan consultant or expert

    Nearly 60% of Americans say they have a workable knowledge of how their retirement vehicles operate, but 30% say they don’t know much about how their's works, if anything at all. Find a consultant or expert who can guide you through the details and works closely with you to develop a retirement strategy that meets your needs.

  3. Spread the word

    Most money-related issues are tagged with a me-first mentality, but preparing for retirement should never be viewed as a competition — National Retirement Security Week is the result of a bipartisan effort, after all. Whether you share a post about the week on your social channels, ask your friends if they are on track for a secure retirement, or set up a meeting at work to discuss retirement planning with your coworkers, just do your part to get the word out there.

5 Tips Everyone Should Know About Saving For Retirement From Ubiquity Retirement + Savings
  1. Automate Your Saving

    Have your contributions automatically deducted from your paycheck to guarantee that you're saving.

  2. Boost Contributions as You Age

    If you're over 50 years old, you can save an extra $6,000 per year tax deferred.

  3. If You're Young, Invest More Aggressively

    Choosing a more aggressive investment strategy early will quickly grow your nest egg and give you time to recoup if the market takes a dip.

  4. Meet Your Company Match

    If your company offers to match your contribution up to a certain percentage do it. It is free money and as Ubiquity Retirement + Savings CEO Chad Parks points out, that match can be tax-deductible for your employer.

  5. Diversify Your Retirement Vehicles

    Add a tax-advantaged retirement account like a Roth IRA so that some of your saving grows tax free. For more information visit www.myubiquity.com

Why National Retirement Security Week is Important
  1. Planning for the future is paramount

    While we don't think it's practical to plan out every aspect of one's life, looking forward when it comes to saving money is imperative. While there's nothing wrong with using welfare if you absolutely need it, but it shouldn't be your only choice in terms of financial support during your retirement years.

  2. Retirement funds are a concern for most people

    According to Ubiquity Retirement + Savings, 66% of Americans are worried that they won't have enough money saved up by the time they retire. These concerns aren't unjustified. 1 in 3 Americans currently have less than $5,000 saved — an amount that would last a few months at most depending on location — and it is predicted that half of Americans won't be able to maintain their standard of living once they retire.

  3. Not all employees are offered a retirement plan

    While 28% of Americans take full advantage of their company’s retirement saving options, 20% aren't even offered a plan by their employer. This week is here to help guide those individuals to alternative solutions, like an Individual Retirement Account (IRA).

 
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The United States Navy is celebrating its 244th birthday on Sunday.

Founded on Oct. 13, 1775, the U.S. Navy describes itself as the “largest, most advanced, and most lethal fighting force the world has ever known.”

The U.S. Navy is the largest naval force in the world.

The branch says it has more than 330,000 active-duty personnel and an additional 100,000 on ready-reserve.

It’s fleet includes aircraft carriers, amphibious assault ships, cruisers, destroyers and submarines.

Chief of Naval Operations Admiral Mike Gilday said: “As we celebrate across the fleet, we renew our commitment to be ready; to remember those who forged our legacy, and to honor our families and loved ones who stand beside us.”

 

John F. Kennedy was the first navy veteran elected president. But five of the next six presidents also served in the navy: Lyndon JohnsonRichard NixonGerald Ford, Jimmy Carter, and George H.W. Bush. Well-known navy veterans include baseball Hall-of-Famers Yogi Berra and Stan Musial, basketball Hall-of-Famers David Robinson and John Wooden, football Hall-of-Famer Roger Staubach, former Tonight Show host Johnny Carson, actor Humphrey Bogart, and astronaut Neil Armstrong.

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Link: USS Constitution. https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/USS_Constitution

 

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National Fluffernutter Day – October 8, 2019
 
National Fluffernutter Day 2019 – October 8

Marshmallow Fluff, peanut butter, bread — what’s not to love about a Fluffernutter? And on October 8, you can eat as many as you’d like thanks to National Fluffernutter Day. Initially, the term “Fluffernutter” was coined as a way for the marshmallow spread manufacturing company, Durkee-Mower Inc., to market a sandwich that featured Fluff. Now, it’s a national holiday. So celebrate National Flutternutter Day by eating it in sandwich, cookie, cupcake, or candy form — we promise not to judge how you get your Fluffernutter intake.

National Fluffernutter Day - History ​1960 ​"Fluffernutter" used as a marketing tactic

​As a way to market the marshmallow/peanut butter sandwich idea — and appeal to more people — an advertising agency coined the term “Fluffernutter."

​1920 Same creme — new name

​Archibald Query sold his Marshmallow Creme recipe to Durkee-Mower, Inc. — the company that still owns it today — and renamed it Marshmallow Fluff

​1917 ​The original creme is created

​​Archibald Query of Somerville, Massachusetts, invented a sweet, marshmallow-like spread that he named Marshmallow Creme.

National Fluffernutter Day Activities
  1. Go nuts with your fluffernutter creations.

    Although Fluff with peanut butter is the OG of fluffernutters, there’s no rule saying you can’t get creative — so experiment with new combinations. For a more savory take, try adding bacon. To add a bit of tang, spread on some jam. If you want to create the ultimate sweet treat, try adding bananas, chocolate chips, or Nutella.

  2. Spread the fluffernutter love

    While it may be tempting to keep the gooey goodness of a fluffernutter to yourself, remember: there’s plenty of Fluff to go around. So on National Fluffernutter Day, celebrate by spreading the love by making extras for your coworkers and friends. If you have kids, bake fluffernutter-inspired cupcakes or cookies for them to bring to school and share with classmates and teachers.

  3. Share the goodness on social media.

    Whatever fluffernutter creations you choose to consume, share your tasty treats on social media. Snap a pic, take a Boomerang, capture the deliciousness on a video — however you choose to post about your National Fluffernutter Day treat, just be sure to use #FluffernutterDay when posting.

​​5 Reasons We Can't Get Enough Fluff
  1. Fluff has made it to outer space

    ​Former International Space Station commander Sunita Willimas requested to have containers of Fluff on her 322-day journey to space.

  2. Fluff festival

    ​Celebrated every September, the “What the Fluff?” festival takes place in Fluff’s hometown of Somerville, Massachusetts, and draws approximately 10,000 visitors every year.

  3. Only 4 ingredients

    ​Fluff has yet to change its recipe: corn syrup, dried egg whites, sugar and vanilla.

  4. The Northeast luffs Fluff

    ​Half of all Fluff profits (through selling 7 million pounds annually) comes from New England and upstate New York.

  5. ​Paul Revere’s descendants invented the first Fluff-like product

    Paul Revere’s great-great-great grandchildren created Snowflake Marshmallow creme and started selling “Liberty Sandwiches"— consisting of creme and peanut butter, during World War I.

Why We Love National Fluffernutter Day
  1. We get to eat something delicious

    There are a lot of great reasons why celebrating National Fluffernutter Day is so much fun, but one of the main reasons is pretty simple: they’re just so fluffin’ amazing. Marshmallowy goodness with peanut butter spread between two slices of bread — who doesn’t love that? Plus, it’s the perfect treat for breakfast, lunch, or dinner. (Well, on this day anyway.)

  2. Adults get to embrace their inner kid

    Of course kids love National Fluffernutter Day, but it's also an opportunity for adults to feel like a kid again. Although people of all ages can eat fluffernutters any day of the year, chances are most adults don’t — so National Fluffenutter Day is the perfect opportunity for them to indulge on a treat they most likely haven’t had in a long time.

  3. It’s an excuse to not cook

    Whether or not you love cooking, National Fluffernutter Day is an automatic night off. So relax, because you’ll have all this extra time to do whatever you want — like savor every last bite of a fluffernutter. To save even more time, shop for your fluffernutter ingredients the day before National Fluffernutter Day.

 
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WELCOME TO INTERNATIONAL COFFEE DAY 2019

Every year on 1 October, the world comes together to celebrate coffee and recognise the millions of people across the globe - from farmers, to roasters, baristas, coffee shop owners and more  - who work hard to create and serve the beverage we all love.

 

Coffee has never been more popular, with an estimated 3 billion cups consumed every day, a number which continues to rise. The diverse mix of global celebrations that take place on International Coffee Day truly showcase coffee as one of the world’s most loved beverages.

 

Whilst this is a time for celebration, leading up to and during ICD each year, we also focus on how to continue to improve coffee’s future. At present, in spite of growing demand, coffee faces a dramatic issue, as the prices that producers receive today are more than 30% below the average of the last ten years, threatening the livelihoods of coffee farmers and their families. 

This year we're on a collectivemission to help coffee farmers around the world receive a fair, living income. 

 

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Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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Boy this is a huge error by a boy born and raised in Wisconsin!

 

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NATIONAL DRINK BEER DAY

National Drink Beer Day toasts that malty elixir on September 28th, annually. Just as the Oktoberfest season comes to an end, the day reminds us to enjoy the world’s most popular adult beverage.

Beer lovers have more selection than ever before in the ale and lager market. An explosion in the craft beer industry keeps the competition and the flavors robust, churning out new flavors seasonally.  Beer connoisseurs quench their thirst with flavors drastically different from their grandfather’s beers.  Rootbeer to raspberry, caramel, and hints of herbs all tickle the palate when it comes to artisanal beers.

Around the country, and from around the world, a wide assortment of beers offers plenty of ways to celebrate.

 

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Willkommen to the longest-running Oktoberfest in the Midwest.

Some come for the epic parades, others for the biergarten. If you’re German or just looking for an excuse to wear a dirndl or some lederhosen—we’re happy you’re here.

So, raise a stein and prost to 59 years of gemütlichkeit and cheer—it’s what makes us das beste!

 

Oktoberfest USA — La Crosse, WI

September 29 - October 2

Oktoberfest USA[9] in La Crosse is one festival that’s definitely full of hometown pride. The Torchlight Parade opens the festivities on September 29, and the fun continues for four full days. The craft beer night features a huge beer sampling tent with more than 38 craft beers and a long list of food vendors ensure no visitors go hungry. Additional activities include the Mrs. Oktoberfest Pageant, a needlework show, the Festmaster's Ball, live music and more. The annual Oktoberfest Medallion Hunt is a fun scavenger hunt that continues throughout the festival, and has guests on the lookout for a small Oktoberfest medallion hidden somewhere within the city. The person who finds it wins $500!

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Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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09/28/2019  EVERYWHERE, US

NATIONAL HUNTING AND FISHING DAY


National Hunting and Fishing Day, celebrated the fourth Saturday of every September, remains one of the most effective grassroots efforts ever undertaken to promote the outdoor sports and conservation.  National, state and local organizations host hunting- and fishing-related public events in various locations — from shooting ranges and wildlife refuges to fish hatcheries and suburban frog ponds. These events help nurture understanding and appreciation of conservation among diverse segments of our communities.

History

In the 1960s, hunters and anglers embraced the era’s heightened environmental awareness but were discouraged that many people didn’t understand the crucial role that sportsmen had played-and continue to play-in the conservation movement.

The first to suggest an official day of thanks to sportsmen was Ira Joffe, owner of Joffe’s Gun Shop in Upper Darby, Pa. In 1970, Pennsylvania Gov. Raymond Shafer adopted Joffe’s idea and created “Outdoor Sportsman’s Day” in the state.

With determined prompting from the National Shooting Sports Foundation, the concept soon emerged on the floor of the U.S. Senate. In June 1971, Sen. Thomas McIntyre, N.H., introduced Joint Resolution 117 authorizing National Hunting and Fishing Day on the fourth Saturday of every September. Rep. Bob Sikes, Fla., introduced an identical measure in the House. In early 1972, Congress unanimously passed both bills.

On May 2, 1972, President Nixon signed the first proclamation of National Hunting and Fishing Day, writing, “I urge all citizens to join with outdoor sportsmen in the wise use of our natural resources and in insuring their proper management for the benefit of future generations.” I greatly enjoyed all of the hunting and fishing my dad and I did together over my young years.

 

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Posted by Dave the Lighthouse Keeper
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