Reply
Contributor

Small type is unreadable

The font size on drug containers has become so small as to be unreadable, particularly for seniors. Am I the only one who simply cannot read the instructions? This is dangerous and can lead to overdosing and other consequences. It seems that big Pharma is in a race to see who can make the font size the smallest possible. Even when the instructions are printed separately, the font size is ridiculously small and illegible.

 

Referring to websites is not good enough for those who are not technology proficient, again particularly among seniors.  And we don't all carry magnifying glasses into the bathroom!

 

Is it time for legislation to ban any font size less than 8pts?

Contributor

Not only medicine bottles--the preparation instructions, contents, and nutritional values printed on most food packages defy even magnifying glasses.  I have seen instructions on packages of frozen foods that are in white 6-point type on yellow background, while ads for other products are emblazoned in huge dark letters.  This is a health issue, because it is easy to miss a component that might be injurious or a step in preparation that is important. 

Periodic Contributor

A practical solution I found is to buy an old-fashioned, hand-held, magnifying glass and using it for this and other purposes at home.  There's lots to chose from at Amazon; search for "magnifying glasses."

0 Kudos
661 Views
0
Report
cancel
Showing results for 
Show  only  | Search instead for 
Did you mean: 
Users
Need to Know

"I downloaded AARP Perks to assist in staying connected and never missing out on a discount!" -LeeshaD341679

AARP Perks

More From AARP