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Re: Asking about an upper age limit is a good question to ask in an interview

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Yes, there is a law...and no, people are not going to go and write up complaints.  Most cases never come out in favor of the individual who is older.  There is always something, real or imagined, which helps these people and places dodge the law. 

 

 

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Re: Asking about an upper age limit is a good question to ask in an interview

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Age differences in work places are always difficult if there is a prejudice with regard to age. It is an unfortunate fact of life. Some places like Home Depot and other such retail establishments may even welcome older employees especially if they have worked in the building industry before.
I would also sign a petition to raise age limits to the max. Experience is valuable.
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Re: Asking about an upper age limit is a good question to ask in an interview

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Why true there is a law about age discrimination on the books.  Chances are very high it will not assist in any way.  Why?

It is currently legal for employers and prospective employers to ask your age as well as your graduation date.  So to even try to get to point of interview they can ask and you must answer about your birthdate and graduation.  And if you lie, automatic disqualification.

And about that law from 1967, well in year 2009 the US Supreme court said "plaintiffs must meet a higher burden of proof for age discrimination than for other types of discrimination. In other words, the Supreme Court moved the law backward and sent a message to employers that some amount of proven discrimination is legally allowed".  So what this means is business with more than 20 employees will win pretty much every time.  Trying to prove this is about impossible.  Best way is to checkout places like Retirement.com that verifies if companies do really hire people over age 50. 

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Re: Asking about an upper age limit is a good question to ask in an interview

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@PatrickR720159 wrote:

Once you filled out the application and if they force you to put down the year you were born in, and they do let you come in for an interview, and the person that is interviewing you is much younger than you are, and you see a whole bunch of "kids" working there rather than people our age, you should ask them "is there an age limit" (upper age limit).  That way you can see if they want to be like American Idol age wise and impose an upper age limit of either 28 or 30.  And if they do that, they have shown to the public how stupid they can be.  Ones that are superior in hiring only people no older than the age of 25 are lawn care people and coffee baristas.  I went to Starbucks in Balwin and I did get lucky and saw a coffee barista that is more like our age rather than a young person.  It seems that Starbucks coffee is one of the very few coffee places that are age friendly and are willing to hire some people our age.  Some veteran carwashes will even hire people our age but Waterway, they sometimes like to turn chicken when it comes to hiring.  I wrote to Waterway carwash and they stated that they don't have an upper age limit but each time I go to one to watch the cars go thru the wash, I only see young people.  Once in a blue moon will I see a veteran working there. If there was a petition out there on the Internet that would try to get some employers that have upper age limits to raise them from like 28 up to 99, I sure would sign it.  


@PatrickR720159

 

You don't need a petition.

 

There is a law regarding age discrimination.

 

It is THE AGE DISCRIMINATION IN EMPLOYMENT ACT OF 1967.

 

It protects those over 40 against discrimination on the basis of age in hiring, promotion, discharge, and compensation, or other terms or conditions of employment.

 

Sounds like you feel these companies are violating this law.

 

Report them to the Equal Employment Opportunity Commission (EEOC).

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Asking about an upper age limit is a good question to ask in an interview

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Once you filled out the application and if they force you to put down the year you were born in, and they do let you come in for an interview, and the person that is interviewing you is much younger than you are, and you see a whole bunch of "kids" working there rather than people our age, you should ask them "is there an age limit" (upper age limit).  That way you can see if they want to be like American Idol age wise and impose an upper age limit of either 28 or 30.  And if they do that, they have shown to the public how stupid they can be.  Ones that are superior in hiring only people no older than the age of 25 are lawn care people and coffee baristas.  I went to Starbucks in Balwin and I did get lucky and saw a coffee barista that is more like our age rather than a young person.  It seems that Starbucks coffee is one of the very few coffee places that are age friendly and are willing to hire some people our age.  Some veteran carwashes will even hire people our age but Waterway, they sometimes like to turn chicken when it comes to hiring.  I wrote to Waterway carwash and they stated that they don't have an upper age limit but each time I go to one to watch the cars go thru the wash, I only see young people.  Once in a blue moon will I see a veteran working there. If there was a petition out there on the Internet that would try to get some employers that have upper age limits to raise them from like 28 up to 99, I sure would sign it.  

Seniors are just antique people rich with history.
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