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What's everyone reading?

Hi everyone,

Thought
I'd get my thread started here on what's everyone readingI'm currently
reading John Grisham's "The Summons".  It's very interesting and I hope to finish it
sometime todayWhat's on your coffee table, nightstand or end table?

Janese

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Sue, I started reading Maeve Binchy years ago and have enjoyed her books that I read.  I'm currently reading GULP about our alimentary canal (digestive system).  It's somewhat interesting but not what I thought it would be and it isn't exactly a book that I'd recommend. 

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I brought mostly historical fiction home from the library.    I am  starting with Wife to the **bleep** by Hilda Lewis.   It is about Matilda, wife of William the Conquerer.  I am pretty weak in English history prior to the Plantagenets, this book should give me some background.  It will be light quick reading. 

 

OK the naughty police changed the title and this sounds silly now . Woman Frustrated

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Sun night I finished reading"Dissolution" by British crime novelist,CJ Sansom, my sister Mary had recommended. I enjoyed it,fast paced. There are 4 other books in this series,I may buy them in the future.

The book I'm reading now is"The Silkworm" by Robert Galbraith. I had read the first book "The Cuckoo's Calling" last yr,terrific. The main character in these books is Cormoran Strike,a war veteran who is now a private detective. In this book,he & his assistant,Robin try to find what happened to a novelist who has disappeared. The author is better well known as JK Rowling who wrote the wonderful Harry Potter series books which I loved. Sue

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I am still reading Kristin Lavansdatter, it is 1000 pages but i am compelled to read it not because so much happens in the book but because of the timelessness of  the content as it applies to the human condition.   I have a bunch of books ordered from the library for pickup next week.

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The book I'm about to read is"Dissolution" by British writer,CJ Sansom.I have never heard of the author,but my sister,Mary,who lives in UK,loves these crime novels set in Tudor England,she thought I would like it. This is his 1st novel  in yr 1537,main character is Matthew Shardlake,Esq who is summoned to find killer of royal commisioner. The author is a former atty,has a PHD in history. As I said to Mary,always looking for new authors. Sue

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Last night,I finished "Leaving Time' by Jodi Picoult which I enjoyed but didn't expect the major twist towards the end of the book. What I liked most of all ,she did wonderful research regarding elephants living in the wild and those that live in sanctuarys/zoos. Sue

 

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@doglover52 wrote:

Last night,I finished "Leaving Time' by Jodi Picoult which I enjoyed but didn't expect the major twist towards the end of the book. What I liked most of all ,she did wonderful research regarding elephants living in the wild and those that live in sanctuarys/zoos. Sue

 


Sue,  Now that you have mentioned elephants, I definitely want to take a look at Leaving Time.  Pam

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I finished the book I mentioned in my previous post,thought it was good&loved reading about the history of who owned each house in Los Angeles the author,Michael Gross talked about.

The book I'm about to start is "Leaving Home' by Jodi Picoult. I've read a couple of her other books,"Nineteen Minutes,Mercy,Plain Truth". She's a good writer. Sue

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@doglover52 wrote:

I finished the book I mentioned in my previous post,thought it was good&loved reading about the history of who owned each house in Los Angeles the author,Michael Gross talked about.

The book I'm about to start is "Leaving Home' by Jodi Picoult. I've read a couple of her other books,"Nineteen Minutes,Mercy,Plain Truth". She's a good writer. Sue


I have enjoyed several of Jodi Picoult's novels, but I got weary of her emphasis on suspense that involves children.  (I am not positive that each of her novels centers on children, but it seems like most of them do.)    Pam    

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I enjoyed the Garrison Keillor book finished it in a couple of days.

The book I've been reading is part history and find it fascinating. Its called"Unreal Estate:MOney,Ambition and the Lust for Land In Los Angeles" by Michael Gross. He writes how some of the most expensive&private enclaves pieces of real estate came to be,who lived in these huge mansions over the years some of the addresses have been torn down,celebrities I recognize,some not. The areas the author writes about are familar names associated with L.A. Beverly Hills,Bel-Air,Holmby Hills,Beverly Park. Sue

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@doglover52 wrote:

I enjoyed the Garrison Keillor book finished it in a couple of days.

The book I've been reading is part history and find fascinating. Its called"Unreal Estate:MOney,Ambition and the Lust for Land In Los Angeles" by Michael Gross. He writes how some of the most expensive&private enclaves pieces of real estate came to be,who lived in these huge mansions over the yearssome of the addresses hve been torn down,celebrities I recognize,some not. The areas Gross writes about are familar names associated with L.A. Beverly Hills,Bel-Air,Holmby Hills,Beverly Park. Sue


The book you are currently reading sounds interesting, Sue.  I may have to give it a look.  Of course, you manage to make most everything you read sound interesting, which is a credit to your way with words, I think.  Smiley Happy

 

Right now I am re-reading the last 5 books in the Maisie Dobbs series of novels by Jacqueline Winspear.  I have become attached to the characters in this series, the same way many of us became taken with the characters in the TV series, "Downton Abbey."  It is like visiting with old friends, to read through these books again, and right now I am apparently in need of "comfort reading" such as this.  ("Comfort reading" being somewhat akin to "comfort eating", I guess...) 

 

Happy reading wishes to each of you!    Pam   

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This is is novel translated from Norwegian and published in the 1920s.  A different sort of novel and quite interesting, about a woman's life during medival times in Scandinavia. The author won the Nobel prize for literature partially for this trilogy and for the Master of Hestviken.   Her characters are quite complex & deep and the story could well take place at anytime in history including the present.

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In my previous post mentioned I was reading book about German shepard dog"Rin Tin Tin' by Susan Orlean,how this dog became famous. It was interesting but towards the end,felt the author rambled on too long,book is 320 pgs.

Next up "The Keillor Reader" by Garrision Keillor,40 yrs of stories where they all came from.I've always enjoyed reading his books,love his sense of humor,try to listen to "Prairie Home Companion'" every week on  the radio Sue

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This sounds good Sue, a change of pace.   I need  humor in my life. Smiley Wink

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I saw the movie "The Theory of Everything" with my daughter around Christmas.  I thought it was great.  I don't think I'll read the book.

 

My book group has just finished reading two great books: The Boys in the Boat by Danial James Brown and Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline.  I won't forget either one very soon.

 

For our next meeting, we're reading Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock by David Margolick.  This is the story of a black girl trying to enter, and desegregate, Little Rock Central High School, while an angry white girl stood behind her shouting epithets.  Their picture is one of the most harrowing and instantly recognizable photographs of the civil rights era.

 

Nancy

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Nancy, glad you are back!  I usually reading the books you report on.

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@aberlaine wrote:

I saw the movie "The Theory of Everything" with my daughter around Christmas.  I thought it was great.  I don't think I'll read the book.

 

My book group has just finished reading two great books: The Boys in the Boat by Danial James Brown and Orphan Train by Christina Baker Kline.  I won't forget either one very soon.

 

For our next meeting, we're reading Elizabeth and Hazel: Two Women of Little Rock by David Margolick.  This is the story of a black girl trying to enter, and desegregate, Little Rock Central High School, while an angry white girl stood behind her shouting epithets.  Their picture is one of the most harrowing and instantly recognizable photographs of the civil rights era.

 

Nancy


Hi Nancy also read "Boys In The Boat' and "Orphan Train",loved both of them. These were 2 books I didn't want to end Sue

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The Theory of Everything was the movie they were showing for our Senior Lunch and Movie yesterday but while we went for lunch, my husband didn't want to stay for the movie.  However,  had this on order from the library and low and behold it came into the library this week and I hope to watch it this evening (if there isn't a basketball game going on).  My sister went and she enjoyed it.

Don't think I'll read the book.

 

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I finished this afternoon,"Flying Shoes" by Lisa Howorth which I mentioned in my previous post. She is new author,I enjoyed the book. What I didn't realize is,story is a fictious account of the real life abduction and unsolved murder of her 9 yr old brother,Steven. My only complaint is book was too long at 322pgs.

The book I'm about to start is "Rin Tin Tin,Life and Legend" by Susan Orlean. Its the true story how this one particular German Shepard became a movie icon. I'm a life long dog lover,I've read rave reviews for this book which came out in 2011. Sue

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I finally finished the above book, nice somewhat light reading.  I love books about ancient civilizations, especially Roman.  I have had very little time to devote to reading, only about 1/2 hour per day.  Should have more leisure time in the summer and I hope to return to regular posting here.  I really do not want this thread to die.

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. I'm always looking for new authors,Tues I was in the independent bookstore which I'm a member of,the book I bought sounded interesting. The name  Is "Flying Shoes' by Lisa Howorth. The story is set in Mississippi,30yrs ago Mary Bryd Thorton's family dealt with heartbreak. She gets a call from police to return to her home state of Virginia because the cold case has been reopened.

What I've read so far is good,the book reminds me of the detailed description of the South in another book'The Help' Sue

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I've been reading JD Robb's futuristic,thrillers "In Death" series books on/off for yrs. JD Robb for those of you who don't know is a pseudonym for best selling author,Nora Roberts. I love these  because they are set in the future,well written with some humor,same  characters are in each book. Her #1 main character is Lt. Eve Dallas who works in NYC police dept with her trusty assistant,Peabody. The books remind me of what "Law&Order:SVU" would be like in the future. Robb has written over 35 of these books,usually takes me 2-3days to finish. If anybody is interested,I suggest you start with the first book,"Naked In Death" Sue

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I've always been interested in reading different types of history books either non-fiction or fiction. British author,Ken Follett for years was known for writing only spy novels e.g"The Key to Rebecca',Eye of The Needle'.In 1989 he wrote a novel so totally different from his other books. "Pillars  of the Earth" is the story of building a Gothic English cathederal in 12th century.I've read the book twice,think its his masterpiece.{The sequel "World Without End" wasn't as good} I've been interested in reading about catherdrals around the world ever since.

The book I'm reading now is"Treasures of Westminster Abbey" by Tony Trowles. Its a soft cover,lovely colored illustrated ,everything you want to know about this world famous cathedral. Its history goes back 1,000yrs. British kings/queens are buried there along with other notables such as composers Ralph Vaughan Williams,Benjamin Britten,naturalist Charles Darwin,authors Charles Dickens,Alfred Lord Tennyson.I've never been to England,so this is the next best thing to being there Sue

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I've been a fan of  NYTimes columnist, David Brooks for couple of years.,His columns appear twice/wk Tues&Fri. He  is on Fri's PBS"Newshour" usually with another columnist,Mark Shields.

Brooks has just published an interesting book called"Road to Character",he profiles interesting people from all walks of life. What I liked about the book,he gives readers mini bios/history of person how their character evolved over their lifetime. There are 2 people in the book I never heard of,Francis Perkins who was in FDR's adminstration,Philip Randolph,a civil right's leader. my only complaint,book was too long 270pgs. If you like Brooks,I recommend the book. The other book I have of his which he wrote in 2000 is "Bobos In Paradise:The New Upper Class and How They Got There". Its great Sue

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@doglover52 wrote:

I've been a fan of  NYTimes columnist, David Brooks for couple of years.,His columns appear twice/wk Tues&Fri. He  is on Fri's PBS"Newshour" usually with another columnist,Mark Shields.

Brooks has just published an interesting book called"Road to Character",he profiles interesting people from all walks of life. What I liked about the book,he gives readers mini bios/history of person how their character evolved over their lifetime. There are 2 people in the book I never heard of,Francis Perkins who was in FDR's adminstration,Philip Randolph,a civil right's leader. my only complaint,book was too long 270pgs. If you like Brooks,I recommend the book. The other book I have of his which he wrote in 2000 is "Bobos In Paradise:The New Upper Class and How They Got There". Its great Sue


I always read your posts with interest, Sue, & usually end up taking a look at any book you have mentioned.  I do not end up actually reading every book you mention, but you are broadening my reading possibilities with your recommendations & comments, so thanks!  Pam

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Sue, I wanted you to know that I've started reading Crazy Rich: Power,Scandal,Tragedy,Inside the Johnson&Johnson Dynasty" by Jerry Oppenheimer.  Not too far into it but what I want to know does it ever get easier to figure out who's who?  I'm glad Oppenheimer put the family tree in there to refer to and so far he seems to help clarify which family it is.  Who ever would have known all the scuttle-butt about that family and it is interesting the Johnson family is compared to the Kennedy family.  Will post more as I go along.  And I agree with the previous post, you do have interesting book suggestions.

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@Angel-Sally wrote:

Sue, I wanted you to know that I've started reading Crazy Rich: Power,Scandal,Tragedy,Inside the Johnson&Johnson Dynasty" by Jerry Oppenheimer.  Not too far into it but what I want to know does it ever get easier to figure out who's who?  I'm glad Oppenheimer put the family tree in there to refer to and so far he seems to help clarify which family it is.  Who ever would have known all the scuttle-butt about that family and it is interesting the Johnson family is compared to the Kennedy family.  Will post more as I go along.  And I agree with the previous post, you do have interesting book suggestions.


Hi,Angel-Sally,thanks for your comments.Yes,it was confusing for me for awhile to figure out which family member belonged to whom. I had to ck the family tree reference from time to time to keep members straight. Sue

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Johnson and Johnson book - liking it more as I go along.  It will be a while before I finish, I think.  Believe it has around 500 pages.  I hope I can move along quickly...Sally

 

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The book I started yesterday  is "Euphoria" by Lilly King.Its a historical story of 3 young anthropologists in New Guinea in 1930. The female in group is reknown anthropologist,Margaret Mead,other 2 are her 2nd and 3rd husband. I had never heard of the author,but the book received rave reviews,was one of the top 10 NYTimes books in 2014. Its only  257 pgs Sue

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@doglover52 wrote:

The book I started yesterday  is "Euphoria" by Lilly King.Its a historical story of 3 young anthropologists in New Guinea in 1930. The female in group is reknown anthropologist,Margaret Mead,other 2 are her 2nd and 3rd husband. I had never heard of the author,but the book received rave reviews,was one of the top 10 NYTimes books in 2014. Its only  257 pgs Sue


I read about 120 pgs,couldn't get into the book. In my opinion,didn't deserve the rave reviews.

I'm now reading"One PLus One" by JoJo Moyes.Her other books I've read are"Me Before You,SilverBay,"The Girl You Left Behind" enjoyed them all Sue

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