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re: More Kids

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In Response to More Kids:

David now lives with us. He’s Bill’s oldest at fourteen. When we pick him up at the airport Bill doesn’t recognize him and lets him walk right by us. This after I asked him how he will know David. "I’ll know him." He looks just like Bill. I’m angry. Imagine how David feels.


David and I get along pretty good. He’s closer to my age than his father is. He’s great with Kari. When something happens at school, Kari and I go. Every football game and every fundraiser. (Once he volunteered me to make five dozen, made from scratch, enchiladas. Five dozen!) Every bad thing, too. I carry him to the emergency room when he breaks his thumb in a fight. To the doctor when he’s sick. I buy his clothes, feed him and be his friend.


He has a mom. He needs a dad.


On December 28th I graduate from LPN school. I’m happy but sad too. School has given me a refuge from the pain and turmoil of my life. The next day Bill and I are in Millington, Tennessee. We’re moving back there. Bill stays to get a job and find us a home. I go back to get the kids.


We live in a tired, run-down trailer in a tired, run-down trailer park. We are always cold. I keep Kari in layers of warm clothes. She doesn’t seem to notice the cold.


Bill is working in the same building, in the same shop, doing the same job and under the same supervisor as he had worked for when he was still in the Navy.


I now have three kids. Sandy, who is thirteen is here. We move into a three bedroom house where Sandy and David each have their own rooms. Sandy sneaks out of the house at night and skips school a lot and David goes with her "to protect her." I try to talk to Bill about these things and he says, "You just don't like her because she’s mine and not yours." Where did that come from?


Now Dad and the rest of the family live in the same trailer we had lived in. Mary wants to be my friend. Well, I don’t have any real friends anyway. We shop together and she buys clothes they can’t afford and lies to Dad about the cost. I don’t think he ever sees his paycheck. She picks it up, signs it and cashes it.


Dad and Bill are always at the Brig together. Bill is running a tab again that’s usually three to four hundred dollars a payday. I know, I used to add to the tab with my beer and laugh when some guys wife called and he was "not here." Now I’m the wife calling too often.


Today I packed what few things Kari and I have and leave. I don't go far before I call Bill. "It’s either Sandy or me." Bill chooses to send Sandy home to her mother. I put her on a bus because we can't afford air fare. Bill doesn’t even go to the bus station with us. David doesn’t stay with us much longer.


©BertaD

your story continues to be compelling--made more so, I think by the use of present tense


can't wait for the next installment!


(my ex-in-laws lived in Millington--it is a depressing little town--our car broke down there. I remember the clay backroads)

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More Kids

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David now lives with us. He’s Bill’s oldest at fourteen. When we pick him up at the airport Bill doesn’t recognize him and lets him walk right by us. This after I asked him how he will know David. "I’ll know him." He looks just like Bill. I’m angry. Imagine how David feels.


David and I get along pretty good. He’s closer to my age than his father is. He’s great with Kari. When something happens at school, Kari and I go. Every football game and every fundraiser. (Once he volunteered me to make five dozen, made from scratch, enchiladas. Five dozen!) Every bad thing, too. I carry him to the emergency room when he breaks his thumb in a fight. To the doctor when he’s sick. I buy his clothes, feed him and be his friend.


He has a mom. He needs a dad.


On December 28th I graduate from LPN school. I’m happy but sad too. School has given me a refuge from the pain and turmoil of my life. The next day Bill and I are in Millington, Tennessee. We’re moving back there. Bill stays to get a job and find us a home. I go back to get the kids.


We live in a tired, run-down trailer in a tired, run-down trailer park. We are always cold. I keep Kari in layers of warm clothes. She doesn’t seem to notice the cold.


Bill is working in the same building, in the same shop, doing the same job and under the same supervisor as he had worked for when he was still in the Navy.


I now have three kids. Sandy, who is thirteen is here. We move into a three bedroom house where Sandy and David each have their own rooms. Sandy sneaks out of the house at night and skips school a lot and David goes with her "to protect her." I try to talk to Bill about these things and he says, "You just don't like her because she’s mine and not yours." Where did that come from?


Now Dad and the rest of the family live in the same trailer we had lived in. Mary wants to be my friend. Well, I don’t have any real friends anyway. We shop together and she buys clothes they can’t afford and lies to Dad about the cost. I don’t think he ever sees his paycheck. She picks it up, signs it and cashes it.


Dad and Bill are always at the Brig together. Bill is running a tab again that’s usually three to four hundred dollars a payday. I know, I used to add to the tab with my beer and laugh when some guys wife called and he was "not here." Now I’m the wife calling too often.


Today I packed what few things Kari and I have and leave. I don't go far before I call Bill. "It’s either Sandy or me." Bill chooses to send Sandy home to her mother. I put her on a bus because we can't afford air fare. Bill doesn’t even go to the bus station with us. David doesn’t stay with us much longer.


©BertaD

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More Kids

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Message 2 of 3

David now lives with us. He’s Bill’s oldest at fourteen. When we pick him up at the airport Bill doesn’t recognize him and lets him walk right by us. This after I asked him how he will know David. "I’ll know him." He looks just like Bill. I’m angry. Imagine how David feels.


David and I get along pretty good. He’s closer to my age than his father is. He’s great with Kari. When something happens at school, Kari and I go. Every football game and every fundraiser. (Once he volunteered me to make five dozen, made from scratch, enchiladas. Five dozen!) Every bad thing, too. I carry him to the emergency room when he breaks his thumb in a fight. To the doctor when he’s sick. I buy his clothes, feed him and be his friend.


He has a mom. He needs a dad.


On December 28th I graduate from LPN school. I’m happy but sad too. School has given me a refuge from the pain and turmoil of my life. The next day Bill and I are in Millington, Tennessee. We’re moving back there. Bill stays to get a job and find us a home. I go back to get the kids.


We live in a tired, run-down trailer in a tired, run-down trailer park. We are always cold. I keep Kari in layers of warm clothes. She doesn’t seem to notice the cold.


Bill is working in the same building, in the same shop, doing the same job and under the same supervisor as he had worked for when he was still in the Navy.


I now have three kids. Sandy, who is thirteen is here. We move into a three bedroom house where Sandy and David each have their own rooms. Sandy sneaks out of the house at night and skips school a lot and David goes with her "to protect her." I try to talk to Bill about these things and he says, "You just don't like her because she’s mine and not yours." Where did that come from?


Now Dad and the rest of the family live in the same trailer we had lived in. Mary wants to be my friend. Well, I don’t have any real friends anyway. We shop together and she buys clothes they can’t afford and lies to Dad about the cost. I don’t think he ever sees his paycheck. She picks it up, signs it and cashes it.


Dad and Bill are always at the Brig together. Bill is running a tab again that’s usually three to four hundred dollars a payday. I know, I used to add to the tab with my beer and laugh when some guys wife called and he was "not here." Now I’m the wife calling too often.


Today I packed what few things Kari and I have and leave. I don't go far before I call Bill. "It’s either Sandy or me." Bill chooses to send Sandy home to her mother. I put her on a bus because we can't afford air fare. Bill doesn’t even go to the bus station with us. David doesn’t stay with us much longer.


©BertaD

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