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Re: Want to take your career to the next level? Ask a Career Coach!

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Message 31 of 62

Good evening. 

I am a Director of Rehabilitation and want to get more involved on boards and do consulting as well.  I have had experience in the past as a Regional Director for Rehab and started up states for other companies.  I have experience transitioning people over to another company with a 90% retention rate and love to teach and share with others.  What would you suggest for me to grow more in my career and supplement what I already love?  How can I break into boards and expand my expertise into other areas.  My specialty is Occupational Therapy.

 

Thank you

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Message 32 of 62

Thanks, @tw38214439  - What a great idea for an online information-based business!  I'm a bit of geek when it comes to this stuff, so I would love to hear more about exactly where you are challenged and where the roadblocks have occurred.

 

Indeed, there are so many options, and a lot of snake-oil out there. You do need to become somewhat tech-savvy in order to pull this off.  It's possible to hire people to execute on your plan, but you have to understand how this stuff works in order to know what you actually need, and how to manage them.  But it's not rocket science!  It is possible to master it - and at any age!

 

What I'm gathering about this whole process (and this is in my own content-marketing evolution as well) is that you have to start as a thought leader and build your authority, and grow the business from there.  Maybe this has been your approach, but for what it's worth (and for the benefit of others reading this thread), you have to start with your blog and start building your email list. You have to be posting regularly (weekly) on your blog and spreading your posts and views on social media (i.e. sharing articles to support your POV). You have to be engaged in the community that already exists around your business and your solution.

 

Is your 6-week program a 1:1 program that you deliver via videoconference (e.g. Zoom) - or perhaps a group program where you're coaching multiple people online simultaneously? Is it an online video course that you record as mini lectures with supporting exercises?  

 

Do you have free content that you're giving away as an incentive for someone to join your list - perhaps a "teaser" version of your course, or some stand-alone exercises they can do to see the benefits of your approach?

 

I'm priming the pump of this conversation to get a better sense from you of where you are in the process.  I'm looking forward to hearing more!

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Message 33 of 62

Thanks @DavidB852954  - Sounds like you are on a solid path.  Did you have a specific question or concern?  It sounds like you need to invest in some additional marketing support to grow your business.

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Message 34 of 62

Hello John, After retiring as a successful chiropractor due to disability, I have developed a 6 week consulting program for people 35-65 with chronic persistent back or neck pain. I wish to market and coach primarily online. I am motivated to do this because of the ongoing opioid crisis and the fact  that with my program people can minimize/eliminate chronic pain without additional pills, surgery or even doctors. 

My roadblocks are tech related. I have hired various coaches/freelancers but my progress is slow this last 18 months. What would you recommend? Thanks in advance!

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Message 35 of 62

@JohnTarnoff I have a landscape and a catering business and at one time my catering business was growing, I didn't have all of the tools in order to make my catering business blossom. My landscape business has always been good, I just want it to become bigger and better. 

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Message 36 of 62

Yay! Glad it resonated! Wishing you the best of luck @PeterM347935. Keep in touch with me via LinkedIn or my website https://johntarnoff.com

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Message 37 of 62

Excellent feedback John! You made me look at stuff differently and I feel a lot more empowered now with that advice! Thanks!

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Message 38 of 62

Thanks, @PeterM347935 -

 

I think it's great that you're going for an advanced degree in your field.  This will certainly give you greater authority for the work that you're looking to do.

 

The key question shouldn't be the kind of company you want to work for, it's the job you want to do, and more specficially the value proposition that you bring to the table.

 

Yes, as an older worker, you are going to have a more difficult time because the hiring process overall is focused on younger people (see earlier posts in this thread for more on that injustice!). 

 

But you bring so much more to the table than mere "job qualifications." With your 3 decades (I'm assuming) in your field, plus this new degree, you should have a pretty good sense of what exactly you would like to do at this stage in your career.  I would start there.  Figure out the "Peter LLC" angle that you want to focus on.  What problems do you like to solve in the work that you do?  How does the degree enhance your ability to do that work?  What additional (perhaps more refined or more technical) problems will the degree qualify you to solve?

 

Start with you, and your value proposition, and then look for companies who are struggling with the problems you solve.  It may or may not be a company like Fitbit.  But in the process of finding the company where you're eventually going to land, you should by all means check out the top companies you're interested in and build connections there.  Again, these connections will be based on the value proposition you're "selling."  You may meet people at these top companies (either through LinkedIn, or at conferences, networking events etc.) who say "I like what you do, but we don't have any need for that right now.  However, I want to introduce you to my friend at Company X who might be interested."

 

As you can see from my earlier replies in this thread, I'm a big believer in your network as the way to build traction and find your eventual berth.  At this age, "fit" is vital.  Employers want it, and you don't want to go to work for a company that sounds good on paper, but where the culture is actually toxic, or you're stuck in a position that only uses 20% of your potential.  You're too old to take a back seat or get mired in useless power politics just because you want to be at a "marquee" company.  Find the place where you can do the work you want to do and work with people who understand you , support you, and where your success is their success.  Or you could be consulting to a handful of innovative startups in your field, doing leading-edge work, building your reputation as a problem solver.  Your phone will be ringing off the hook (as we used to say).  

 

Bottom line, if there's a need/market for what you do, and you have a clear and consistent message around that value proposition, it doesn't matter how old you are because you're filling a real need and driving bottom-line results.

 

Let me know if this makes sense, and if you have any other questions!

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Message 39 of 62

I'm going back to school for a MS in biotechnology. I currently am a Fitness Director at a health club. I'm concentrating on management within the biotechnology degree since I have managed my own business for over 20 years and currently help in managing the club I work at. I'd like to work in management in a biotechnology company like Fitbit or something similar, but I worry about being accepted at my age which will be 52 when I graduate. Are my fears justified and what can I do to be more viable?

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Message 40 of 62

@RebeccaA376184 wrote:

Hi, John -- I'm 62 years old and lost my job in PR/Communications in December because I asked my boss for a meeting to discuss a title change and reclassification of my job. I apply for job after job -- I have more than 30 years of progressive Public Relations experience, but don't get inteviews. I had my resume and cover letter reviewed and paid to have it revamped through the AARP recommended vendor. It came back with numerous errors and typos, so I corrected everything and I am using their version for applications. Still no nibbles. 

I'm into my 9th month of unemployment and need a job quickly. Any suggestions for me? I have worked in both the for- and non-profit sectors, including health care and cultural institutions.

Thanks, Rebecca.


 

Thanks @RebeccaA376184 

 

I wish we had connected nine months ago.  Unfortunately, you are in a situation that many people find themselves in who are older, have been let go, and go about thinking they can apply to jobs the traditional way.  As you have discovered, it no longer works.

 

Resumes no longer get you an interview.  They are necessary as a record of your past achievements, but employers are focused on hiring younger, cheaper, more malleable candidates.  This is the unfortunate, ageist truth.

 

You also have too much experience for most of the jobs that get posted. This is true in any industry.  The bar has been raised for older workers. Employers glaze over when contemplating hiring someone older.  This is a cultural bias issue that we're not going to fix in this conversation, or in the next few years.  It's changing, but none of us has enough time to wait.

 

First, as I've recommended in earlier replies, your LinkedIn profile has to be thoroughly up to date.  This is where everyone goes to learn about you if they think you may be someone of interest.  

 

Second, what is your specialty?  There has to be a niche industry you covered, or a specific talent you have in the PR field.  You have to decide what PR/Comms issue (notice I said issue, not issues) you are the best at handling, and focus your job search on companies who are engaged in that area - or who need someone in that area.  Adopt the mindset of a consultant looking to provide value to a client, not that of an employee looking for a job.

 

Use LinkedIn to target the agencies or Comms divisions of the companies you resonate with, and think could be in your sweet spot in terms of the work that you do.  Find all of the professionals you've worked with over the years and invite them to connect on LinkedIn and see who they know (these would be your "2nd" level connections on LI).  Start networking amongst your 1st and 2nd level connections to find open positions, as well as conferences, events and meetups that you could attend to build your network and find out about openings.

 

It's all about "who you know," particularly in a field like PR/Comms which is so much about personal connection and interaction.

 

In the interim, I would also look for opportunities to volunteer your services to high profile non-profits where you can do good work, make new connections, but also have something to crow about.  That way it looks like you're continuing to work.  

 

Back to LinkedIn, NEVER put something in your headline like "seeking employment" or "seeking new position"  That is anathema to recruiters.  Everyone is looking for you to be actively engaged in your work (hence the recommendation that you volunteer).

 

I wish I had a short term solution for you, but at the end of the day, the only viable sort term solution is a well-established network that you can turn to for information and leads.  Hopefully some of these suggestions can help you reinvigorate your efforts. 

 

Best of luck in making this work. You have lots to offer and should be out there doing great work.  Keep at it, use some of these tips, and I have a feeling the next nine months will be a lot more successful!

 

 

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