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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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Hi Sherry,

 

I'd say exactly what vm10947576 said "I want to enjoy what I am doing, I love to work, and hope to do it until I drop."  or, you can go the sarcastic way and say "I hope to be upright" or "until I kick the bucket". It depends if the interviewer is really considering you or they are just interviewing so they can claim they don't discriminate age. This is typical of government institutions (the education ones for sure) or business that have government contracts.

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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What do you say to the person who is interviewing you and they ask "how long do you plan to work"?

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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I gave up looking for a part-time job; even though I know I am highly capable of doing the job!   I just got tired of age discrimination and looking at it in the "face".

I do an office volunteer job at a non-profit and they all love me and I also drive a tram in a beautiful garden and give history tours of the garden.  I really enjoy being outside with nature!

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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I like your responses.
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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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His intent was to discriminate, so my opinion would be it was discrimination, I have worked in two places that fit the business you are describing. I applaud your response!

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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I am i marketing, and  am called in all the time to do a cattle call interview process.   Each time, I say on the phone, now, is there a room full of people you are interviewing within a short period of time?  They answer and say yes.  This is to take a quick look at me.  They sort out at that time.   When I learn this is the structure, I say, what age group are you looking at, and sometimes they say, nothing, avoid it or say " We are not looking for any age group.  But, once, at a benefits group interview that dwindled down to me, the interviewer said to me, do you think you can work in this high energy culture.  I said "what do you mean."  We have a lot of youthful energy here."  I pursued it further to see how far he would go.  I said "that room is where I will work making calls? It was a room filled with music and everyone under 30 laughing and working in a huge conference room all crammed in.  I said, is that the room I would need to work in?  He said "yes".  Would that be a problem for you?  I said "it probably would be."   "He blammed it on the Culture."  You could sit in the back and separate with earphones.   He got very close to crossing over, but never did.   

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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I liked your response.    I started my journey for a position within Admin in Real Estate rather than sales over a year ago.  I am 64 years old now.   And, what I got was this question that depending upon my mood, either worked for or against me.  In the ladder, I really didn't care I guess.  The question was/is "Where do you see yourself in 5- 10 years".  Sometimes, I went along with them with the canned answer that recruiters said to provide.  And, sometimes, I look at the youth in their eyes, firmly and give a smile like, "Really".  If I feel really comfortable, I say, "I hope to be upright."  But, mostly, I say "I want to enjoy what I am doing, I love to work, and hope to do it until I drop."  I guess that is true since, Social Security's magical age is now 66 years old.  Hahahaha.   

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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@n224188s ,  I didn't know that about FL.  That is not all that safe in an age where ID theft is a multi-billion dollar business. I keep my credit scores locked.  I don't apply for credit even once every other year so it isn't a pain. That is better than life lock.  That is usually how the thieves get caught.  The banks are cagy about what happened to your credit score.  I usually warn them before hand but I remember once when I didn't they claimed it was something else but I said No it is locked and I forgot to tell you.  A normal person knows their score is locked if they don't, I suspect the bank tries to lure them into a trap thinking they have a thief.  The banks are who pays for most of the billions of dollars.

 

That is the curse of the young.  They think they know everything and old people don't know anything.  I see that with my own kids.  They start to wise up by about 30.  It is beyond them that you have been there and done that so you have a real good idea what will happen next.  You learned the hard way and they want to do it the hard way too. 

 

Well, I still think I know most everything but I have always been imature.

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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I never give my real birth date on line.  That gives scammers an in to rob you.  I always use my B-day minus 10 years.   By the way what profile were you talking about?

 

Unfortunately, in my state, Florida, voter registration is public. So even if I hide my age, my name and address, along with all my children's names, are there for the world to see. I once hired an online company to "Delete Me" from lists like PeopleFinder. It took several months and my name disappeared but not the public records so money was wasted. Besides, if you pay the fee to these "people finder" companies, you can still access your records. They check to see if you have a crimininal record and credit status, stuff like that.

 

I have found many millennials and older to be very competent but highly indifferent and dismissive of older folks. Specially during Interviews. Their attitudes are "you are old and can't adapt to the new" but I make it a point of injecting innuendos such as "you'll get there too, sooner or later" when I feel the interview was a waste of time. 

 

When I'm asked about gaps, I answer depending on the situation. I can be nice or flippant if I feel the interviewer is just taking me in for short ride. Uusally, it's "I took time off to care for an elderly relative or to raise my children but always kept up with the changing times"... blah blah. 

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Re: Age Discrimination in Job Search and the Workplace

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@RuthL139321 ,  I feel your pain!

 

One thing, you probably spend less time commuting than I.  An hour commute 1 way in Washington DC is concidered an OK commute and is the average.  When you have to travel 20-30 miles in stop and go traffic it takes forever.  I remember taking 4.5 hrs to get home on a very bad day.  I am sure you think that is crazy if you live in a rural area. 

 

I never give my real birth date on line.  That gives scammers an in to rob you.  I always use my B-day minus 10 years.   By the way what profile were you talking about?

 

It isn't just that they don't like old people but they may be intimidated.  You may be older than their parents.  Even the most stupid manager is not so stupid to hire anyone who could do their job better than they can.  That is why they never hire 'over qualified' employees.  The more incompetent they are, the more careful they need to be. I can remember quite a few interviews where I figured out the manager had no clue how to run an organization.  My questions must have struck nerves.  I was only trying to figure out what the job intailed but the manager didn't know 20% of my questions which he should have. 

 

When you are a senior, you take what you can get.  If it sucks you can contine to job hunt but are working.  I took a bad job and the next job that opened and would be a good fit for me opened over a year later.  Employers hate gaps in your carreer. So if you don't take the job you are screwed financially and make it much harder to find another job.  Being old, any small got you will reduce your chances of getting hired.  I longer you are out of work the harder it is to get a job.    This stopped most of my friends from working. This happens to most of us sooner or later.  I know I gave the best interview because I always ask how I did.  For one I was told no one came close to the answers I provided but they offered the job to someone else.  I usually do extreamly well because I know I have to do much better than the competition if I will be concidered so I come super prepared.

 

 

 

 

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