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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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Chuckle, you got that right. Although they were tough as nails, it was a different tough. During my interviews with WWII veterans, the word "pain" was never used. Physically or emotionally. Strong and humble.
Most of my closest friends now are those guys and they're in their mid to late 90’s. We lose one every three minutes. Honor them while we can.

Charley
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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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Good point. Reminds me of It's A Wonderful Life movie where the town panics but then comes to their senses for the sake of good old George Bailey. 

 

That generation wanted so much and learned to live without many of even the basics. My mom would say how her family always had food but heard my father's family didn’t and had it tougher. Before the war of course. They learned to use everything to the fullest and let’s not forget the victory gardens they had. You want fresh vegetables? Grow them. 

 

Thanks,

charley

 

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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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They had more guts then anyone since Vietnam. And at least with the WWII vets they won the war, one yard at a time . So few of these great men are left. 

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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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It’s been 10 years since the 2008 financial crisis – and how well have people learned the lessons of the past? Not much, it seems, if you look at the increase in consumer debt. It’s now a record $13 trillion – and counting. The Greatest Generation, by contrast, learned the lessons of the past; they were kids of the Depression and they saved. That’s a big lesson learned, worth implementing.

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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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As they say, "You hit the nail right on the head." I just turned 60 last fall and am gaining weight (few sneaky lbs) and need to work the sweat out. Love your outlook and agree, best to be on the other side of the camera than sitting home worrying about what you’re watching. 

 

CV

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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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@CharleyValera  Yes, perhaps that's it. Those of us in my circle that are focused on physical pursuits (Seniors and Masters competition as well as Senior Games competition) are not home watching the talking heads. We're out there making stuff happen, not listening to exaggerated and spun stories about what someone else has done. Neither do we let others tell us what to think (which is, frankly, my view of the function of today's news: 'Here's what you should think about XYZ'. No thanks, I have a functioning brain and can decide what I think all on my own. :0))

 

We don't even have a TV. Indeed, I've lived most my life without TV. (And I used to produce local TV! LOL.) In all honesty, I think not having a TV is one of the huge contributors to my happy life, third in line after the habit of looking for the good which is second to the habit of mindful eating and working out until I sweat. Smiley Happy

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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It was a different world for sure back then. The email world has helped my brothers and I stay closer than we ever were. We text and call at will several times a week from all over the globe as well. 

The Higher Power for them was pretty real. Course, who hasn’t said, "get me out of this just this one more time..."? 

 

Seems though much is lost these days, or watered down. I agree about moving and other life changing circumstances that were less prevelant back then. But #7, a brighter future, seems to be related to media. There seems to be a big swing in negative attention and politics. That’s what makes the future look uncertain, I believe. Wondering what the hot topic will be today. Major radio feeds on twitter. Every major station has twitter running nonstop to find the hot topic to carry on about. I’ve been in some of the nations top stations to see a dedicated person watching tweets plugged into one ear of the DJ. Talk about breaking news. 

 

Nonethless, maybe the next generation can find more peace than the current strife that’s plagued the previous ones. I’ve been called the "Voice of WWII Veterans" by some media. I wear that proudly. When I ask them about today’s problems facing the country, they seems to just not understand why. As if, what’s the point in...mass killings...political chaos...drug abuse...and so on. We have it all now, go enjoy instead of adding to the problem.

 

FWIW. 

Charley

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Re: Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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Hi Charley @CharleyValera 

 

My DH, myself and many of our friends are Gen Xers (AKA Busters). DH and I are each the youngest in our families: our siblings are Boomers. Our siblings tend to be well educated, humble, hardworking, team-playing family people with long-time friends. For them, religion is a mixed bag, as is belief in a better future. (I think nearly all of them believe in a higher power, but only about half of them would call that God.)

 

As for my generation --or at least the ones with whom I am familiar-- I'd say that numbers 3 and 4 are essentially universal for us, and that numbers 1, 2 and 5 are largely true of us. As for 6, well, we have moved around, changed jobs and vocations so much that typically the only non-relative in our life now that has known us well for 30 some odd years is our spouse. We have friends all over the country, but Christmas emails and the hours spent jawing before and after Senior Games events isn't really what you are talking about, is it? Smiley Happy As for 7 I think that one's a mixed bag: many of us anticipate a bright future, and a number of us do not. It seems to me that those who see a bright future are the same ones we jaw with at Senior Games and with whom we cycle, snowshoe and hike. Those who do not see such a thing are the ones who are not active. 

 

FWIW and all.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Lessons I learned from the Greatest Generation WWII Veterans

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Hi everyone, it’s me again, Charley Valera. I like AARP community because I keep thinking we all have many similarities. Especially being the (in)famous Baby-Boomers. 

I've recently been enlightened to some of the qualities that made our parents who they were and subsequently who we are. Unfortunately, I think the chain broke after us somehow. 

After interviewing dozens of WWII veterans for My Father’s War: Memories from Our Honored WWII Soldiers, there were many times I was surprised at the similarities. Well after the book was released, these 7 commonalities, believe, rituals, whatever, came to me. Here is what made them different and what helped us. Maybe not for every single man and women, but you be the judge.

 

1.) God. They believed in a God or higher power to help them through the hell-on-earth they were fighting in.

2.) Humble. They didn’t seem to boast or brag. My father would call them "show-offs" if they did. 

3.) Work. Seemed any job was good enough. Work hard, study and maybe advance. Remember working at the same job for 30 or more years? Those days are gone. 

4.) Team. Everyone worked together for the end result. Give or take orders at war and in life afterwards...and stop complaining. 

5.) Family. Remember having to go "visiting" on Sundays? Having meals together even if they didn’t partake, we had to.

6.) Friends. Who has close friends for 30 years? My parents had dozens of them. They knew the value of friends, even helping each other build additions as families grew. 

7.) Future. They knew we would have a better future than they did. They believed. They were right. 

 

Your thoughts? Additions? This will be the basis for my second book. Still need a name.....arghghghgh.  

 

Come on March, but enjoy the rest of February. 

 

Charley Valera

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