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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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"...There was also one series where several couples lived on the plains of the American west, and that was really tough! They had to build their homes ASAP, and plant, so they'd have food stored up to get them through the winter....".

 

    Frontier House, filmed in Montana (I've been close to where they filmed). I don't do reality shows, but that was of interest to me.


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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MsStretch,  hope you will find it worth the watch, wherever  & whenever you end up watching.  As with "Saints & Strangers", I'd be interested to hear what you think of "The Pilgrims", if you view it.  Pam

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@gatorgorilla wrote:

Lucky you, MsStretch, if you get PBS "On Demand".  I get a good number of channels "On Demand" via BrightHouse Networks, but PBS has never been available.  (Wish it was - that would be so super!) 


Alas, you're right, gatorgorilla. No On Demand for PBS. So I did a Search and just missed the show again! **bleep**! The next airing is at 1:30 AM, May not be able to hang in there until 3:30 AM.

 

Wait! I see you can watch it online. If I open it with the Chrome browser, I should be able to watch it on TV via my Chromecast.



    

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@ASTRAEA wrote:

@gatorgorilla - Westerners had an attitude we find hard to understand today! They would colonize an area .. often to get the natural resources available, acting as if the natives & their towns/countries hardly existed. They believed that since the natives didn't have as developed a society/government as they had in Europe, they must be stupid & wrong, taking it upon themselves to take over & become overlords. Look at "Indian Summers", and how the Brits treated the natives!!

 

The westerners often tried to force the natives to adopt Christianity, although they may have had their own religions & cultural traditions. Missionaries wanted to impose their own puritanical ideas, "saving the natives from their own ignorance". One thing the westerners did bring, was all of their diseases, which sometimes wiped out the native populations.


You've mentioned many pertinent & important points, Astraea. Thanks for the post!  FYI - Some of the points you've mentioned were touched upon in the discussions by historians, during the course of "The Pilgrims". 

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@gatorgorilla - Westerners had an attitude we find hard to understand today! They would colonize an area .. often to get the natural resources available, acting as if the natives & their towns/countries hardly existed. They believed that since the natives didn't have as developed a society/government as they had in Europe, they must be stupid & wrong, taking it upon themselves to take over & become overlords. Look at "Indian Summers", and how the Brits treated the natives!!

 

The westerners often tried to force the natives to adopt Christianity, although they may have had their own religions & cultural traditions. Missionaries wanted to impose their own puritanical ideas, "saving the natives from their own ignorance". One thing the westerners did bring, was all of their diseases, which sometimes wiped out the native populations.


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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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After musing, in a previous post at this topic, about whether Jamestown settlers, or even St. Augustine settlers, should be considered the country's "Founding Fathers", rather than the Pilgrims, I want to add:

 

Europeans intruded upon the native inhabitants of this continent.  To me, the notion of "Founding Fathers" thus does not seem necessary or fitting, actually. Europeans intruded & invaded, & there is no getting away from that fact, in my mind.

 

The term "Founding Fathers", in relation to the political establishment of the United States, is another matter, of course, & is probably the more common usage.  (And I am getting in way over my head with all this Pilgrim/history stuff, creating an ever-increasing muddle! Smiley Frustrated)

  

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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I remember that series you are referring to, Astraea.  Thanks for all the recollection & description.  I know I watched bits & pieces of those programs.  For some reason, however, I didn't become captivated enough to be sure I tuned in for each episode.

 

As for any PBS broadcast & the "Real Housewives" crap - perhaps they should not even be mentioned in the same sentence!   Quite a contrast in program quality there!  (And I should know - I've watched my share of those "Housewives" shows.  Smiley Frustrated )

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@gatorgorilla - Thanks for the expansion! A while back, PBS did several real "reality shows", where individuals & families volunteered to live as people did, during a specific period & in a particular location. There was one documentary in England, where the volunteers were split into an upstairs/downstairs type situation. Another I think was "The 1900 House", where the family learned how difficult it was even being in a city, without the modern conveniences we take for granted .. like a stove that goes on with the turn of a knob, and things like shampoo & conditioner.

 

There was also one series where several couples lived on the plains of the American west, and that was really tough! They had to build their homes ASAP, and plant, so they'd have food stored up to get them through the winter. They had to juggle what little money they would have come with, between buying supplies for planting, and having to buy food if their harvest wasn't sufficient. I seem to remember when it got very cold, it was very uncomfortable despite how well they tried to build their cabins, and after a while they all felt run-down & sick. Not an easy life, and they didn't even have to worry about attacks by Native Americans.

 

I wish PBS would do a few more series like that; they're educational .. but in a way that we could relate to them as people like ourselves. It would be such a welcome alternative to the "Real Housewives" crap!


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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@MsStretch wrote:

@gatorgorilla wrote:

I watched the 2-hour American Experience program, "Pilgrims", last night on PBS.   I thought it was excellent, particularly when we heard the Native American perspective from Native Americans themselves, as historians.  It was an eye-opener - certainly not the  "Pilgrim" story I learned back in grade school!


Dammit, I missed it. On Demand, here I come.

 

Happy Thanksgiving! 


Lucky you, MsStretch, if you get PBS "On Demand".  I get a good number of channels "On Demand" via BrightHouse Networks, but PBS has never been available.  (Wish it was - that would be so super!) 

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Re: Saints & Strangers (NGC)

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@ASTRAEA wrote:
@gatorgorilla wrote:

I watched the 2-hour American Experience program, "Pilgrims", last night on PBS.   I thought it was excellent, particularly when we heard the Native American perspective from Native Americans themselves, as historians.  It was an eye-opener - certainly not the  "Pilgrim" story I learned back in grade school!


I wish I'd stayed awake thru it! Also as a comparison to "Saints & Sinners"!

 

Can you share a little more about it?


I'm not exactly "waxing eloquent" at the moment, so my response may be less than you might wish, but I'll give it a try.

 

I just searched internet & learned that PBS  plans to repeat "Pilgrims" tomorrow night (Nov. 26) at 9pm.  But everyone needs to check their local PBS station schedule.  (My PBS station has been heavily advertising airing of "Alice's Restaurant 50th Anniversary Concert" with Arlo Guthrie, at 9pm tomorrow night.)

 

Also, during my internet search, I became aware that "The Pilgrims" was a Ric Burns' production - had not realized that.  The Burns brothers tend to do top-notch, well-researched documentaries, & this one fits the mold, I think.

 

The show referred to William Bradford's journal quite a bit, & how he managed to shape history to reflect the Pilgrims' story as he wanted it to be understood & remembered, by future generations.  What he presented as their story in his journal, & what was actually the truth, conflicted numerous times apparently.  

 

We hear a number of unsettling truths as the show reveals them in grim detail.

 

We see how tenuous relationships were between the settlers themselves, as well as with the Native Americans.

 

We learn some of the realities, dilemmas, & hardships the Native Americans were facing at that time, including the intrusion of the Pilgrims, of course.

 

We hear about the harsh realities of food shortages, bad outbreaks of illness, and other sorts of hardships which plagued the settlers. Burial of so many who fell ill & died during a short time period becomes a problem for the Pilgrims.  As they try to settle in, conditions are so harsh as to be almost unthinkable, & yet they struggle on.  

 

It was a very, very hard life - the production really makes you feel & understand the harshness, via the historians' reflections upon these people & their real, unromanticized circumstances.

 

(Grim as "Pilgrims" was, the PBS show "Secrets of the Dead - Jamestown", which followed "Pilgrims", seemed even grimmer to me, with the devastating hunger & starvation which plagued that settlement.)

 

I just recalled: during the introductionary portion of "Pilgrims", the question of how the Pilgrims came to be thought of as our "Founding Fathers", in New England, when Jamestown was already established in Virginia, arises.  I don't remember the explanation given, to be quite honest.  But as a Southerner, I was quite taken with the notion of Virginians being our Founding Fathers, rather than New Englanders!  

 

(And now I am thinking I should figure out how the settlement at St. Augustine fits into this picture.  My ties to Jacksonville area make the prospect of St. Augustine settlers being our Founding Fathers even more appealing than those Jamestown settlers!)        

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