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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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I watched Batiste the other night, but it's on a little late for me, and I fell asleep near the end.


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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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Thanks for the recommendation.  I haven't had a series to follow for awhile.  I will check it out. 

 

PBS is also running Baptiste.  Has anyone watched that? 

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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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@MaVolta - That seemed like the strangest knee-jerk "explanation" of the man she met! She knew she probably wouldn't see Louise afterwards & she'd be to involved with her own career, to be gossiping about Norma Carlisle. Maybe her husband wanted her around for socializing, but they could have invented some medical condition requiring she stay in NYC (or anywhere but Kansas), where she could have lived with her beau & his daughter. I can't imagine what kind of physical intimacy they could have had, all living in her husband's house!


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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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@ASTRAEA  - My guess would be that the novel was loosely based around Louise Brooks, and a chaperone who accompanied her. Since the story seems to center more on the character of Norma Carlisle, I would guess that it is mostly in the author's imagination. The search for her true parents may or may not have been true. What happened with her husband may or may not have been true. Did she really bring someone home with her and try to explain it away as her brother?

 

The "arrangement" at the end of the story isn't explained very well. Even though some 20 years have passed, it is still fairly conservative in time and place. Did people in the town really think that Joseph was her brother? And how did they explain the other guy? Sounds like a recipe ripe for gossip.

"Music can change the world because it can change people." - Bono
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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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@MaVolta I looked up Louise Brooks on Wikipedia afterwards, and she did have her ups & downs professionally. I was disappointed that they didn't mention Norma Carlisle as a friend/chaperone. I wonder if the character was an actual person or composite of a few people, or they just used Louise Brooks' real life as a way of telling a story about the mores of the period. 


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Re: PBS "The Chaperone"

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Watched it last night. Takes a lot of interesting twists and turns along the way. Norma's life was anything but normal! We kept wondering what was up with Norma and her husband. I like the way they showed part of the scene before coming back to the full revelation of the matter. Then talk about a surprise ending . . .

 

Julian Fellowes produced it. I always enjoy his programs.

"Music can change the world because it can change people." - Bono
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PBS "The Chaperone"

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If you enjoy period pieces, and would like to see an American one for a change, don't miss "The Chaperone"! I saw it on my PBS station last night, but I'm sure it will be on in different locations, other times this week.

 

It's 1922, and 15 year old Louise Brooks is the dancing daughter of a talented pianist in Wichita, Kansas. She has a great opportunity to study dance at a famous school in NYC, but needs someone to chaperone her stay there. Enter empty nester society matron Norma Carlisle, volunteering to be the chaperone. Norma is played by Elizabeth McGovern (Lady Grantham). The story is taken from the real life of 1920s/30s dancer & actress Louise Brooks, and addresses society & its changing in the 1920s. While Norma Carlisle seems like one of those slightly boring society women - compared to Louise - she turns out to be anything but that!


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