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Honored Social Butterfly

Early TV programs Do You Remember These?

Ted Mack and the Original Amateur Hour. 1948 to 1980

 

A direct descendant of radio's "Major Bowes Original Amateur Hour" (1934-1946), hosted by Major Edward Bowes until his death. After a one-year hiatus, Ted Mack, who had directed Bowes' auditions, revived the show (which lasted into 1952) and brought the concept to the DuMont Television Network. The at-home audience voted by postcard for the favorite, winning performer(s) each week.

 

i love the voting by post cards 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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This is a really old show, taken off the air bec. it supposedly supported  racism (!) - The old "Amos & Andy" show...really funny, and MUCH funnier than any sitcom since, I think.   Yeah, there were sterotypes, but most were standard ones:  nagging wife (Sapphire), mother-in-law from the bad place, the shyster lawyer (a Mr. Calhoun) the con man (the Kingfish, whose laugh at end of show is still in my head!)..the kind of characters I still think are universal ones.   Was sorry that it was deemed negative-really; I see shows on TV now I think are much more stereotypically negative...!

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Periodic Contributor

Wonderful old shows. Love Amos and Andy. Always wanted to be a member of

the Peanut Gallery on the Doody show. They would give away a huge Toosie Roll filled with their candy.  I Love Lucy was a great favorite as was the Lone Ranger. Many of the shows can be seen on streaming video over the internet. 

 

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Regular Contributor

Here are a few of my favorites:

 

What's My Line?

Candid Camera

Kids Say the Darnedest Things

The Ed Sullivan Show

Hullaboo

American Bandstand

All in the Family

 

 

~Sharon~
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Wow, seems like each of those you listed was a favorite of mine!

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Let's add "To Tell The Truth" with Bud Collyer.

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Ah Queen For A Day.  i remember this show airing in the afternoons on Channel 7 in Los Angeles. It was hosted by Jack Bailey.  The premise:  at the start of the show, the camera would pan the audience consisted mostly of women.  Then the announcer would say "who wants to be queen for a day"?  Then it would zoom in on some lucky lady, but she'd not be chosen immediately to build up the suspense and after listening to her sob story then she'd be crowned, given a sceptre and a fur shawl.  Previously each women would give their 'sob story' as to why they should be chosen.  Then her story would be told, the audience would vote by applause, this before the lucky lady with the saddest 'sob story' was told. The prizes were usually something like a washing machine, dryer, vacuum or something like this.  This show aired from  1958-1960 on Channel 7 then aired on Channel 2.from 1961-1964. This show pales in comparison to such big prize shows like 'The Price is Right.

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Newbie

I was a contestant in the Ted Mack show back in spring of 1970.  Sang “Mame” at the producer’s request.  Didn’t win.  But it was quite an experience.

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Conversationalist

I grew up watching tv!  I had Howdy Doody, Uncle Miltie, Ding Dong School, Captain Kangaroo.  As I got a bit older, Ozzie and Harriet, Leave it to Beaver, Ed Sullivan, American Bandstand (even at the tender age of 9!).  The old shows were great geared for families, clean and funny.  Today's shows depend on too much double entendres, sex and violence.  Watch Dragnet for a realistic cop show!

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Periodic Contributor

I grew up in Vermont and we had 3 vhannels and if the weather was bad there was no TV. We werer not allowed to watch unless it was raining out or after dinner. I findly remeber watching "The Lawrence Welk Show" every saturday night. I would sit on the step leading into the livingroom and be very excited to here the singers. I remember when Aurther would come out to dance I would also try to tap...Haha... so funny because even after I took tap I could not do it.

In 1989 I had my daughter and on Saturday night we would watch Lawrence Welk. When she went to school and the discussion was about music and she surprised her teacher with songs and singers from the 40s and big band era. I still watch Lawrence Welk with my mother (91) on Saturday only now it is on at 6pm on PBS. It still brings a smile to my face as I sing along with most all the songs. Fortunately I sing better than I tap. The tradition continues and cannot wait to introduce the music to my grandchildren oneday. So  for now I leave you with this....

Good night, sleep tight and pleasant dreams to you, here's a wish and prayer that all your dreams come true and now 'til we meet again... Adios, Orvour, Alvederzane. Good Night!

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Gold Conversationalist

The best thing I liked on that show (Lawrence Welk) was Big Tiny Little Jr on the honky tonk piano!

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In my household we watched "Beenie and Cecil" , "The Lone Ranger", "Buck Rogers", then later "The Dinah Shore Show", "The Nelsons" (Ozzie, and Harriet & the boys), and "Ed Sullivan Show"among others!  

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The first show I remember watching on television other than the "test pattern" was the Howdy Doody Show.  My younger brother and I were allowed to sit on the living room floor to watch the show.  Other than that, or when there was company, we weren't allowed to go into the living room.  When I was older, some of the cast of the Howdy Doody show put on a show at the local high school, and students were asked to be volunteer ushers during the show, so I volunteered.  We met Claribel the clown in person.  So I got to see the Howdy Doody show in person after watching in on TV as a child.

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I remember all of these and I loved December Bride. 

There was a spin-off from this early show, Pete & Gladys.

The star of Pete & Gladys maybe Henry Morgan (?) was later on M.A.S.H.

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Periodic Contributor

I remember my sister watching American Bandstand from the original studio in Philadelphia.  She watched it everyday and knew all the regulars and their boyfriends and girlfriends and ex-boyfriends and girlfriends.  When we were on a family vacation in 1960 we tried to get tickets to the show while we were in Philly. No luck.  So we went to Pop Singer's drugstore, where the Bandstand kids hungout, and talked to Pop Singer.  He got us tickets for the following day.  We called all our friends and told them to watch.  We gave Dick Clark a stuffed monkey while he interviewed us on the program.  Still a delight to remember our moment of fame!

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I remember watching the boys grow up on Ozzie and Harriet.

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Of course, you can’t forget the Ed Sullivan show, What’s My Line?, Highway Patrol, Cannon, Mannix, Art Linkletter Show.

i saw and introduced myself to Art Linkletter in the Tampa-St. Petersburg Airport in 1999. I saw him and just had to show my respects. I was later told he would frequent the airport and watch people...

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My mother told me early opera soap was Peyton place.see time I wasn't born .I was born 1964

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Anyone remember "the millionaire", every week some got a million dollars

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I've got anvery obscure other short run show from the mid 1950's that was kind of an audience game show where they selected an unsuspecting someone out of the audience, no it wasn't 'The Price is Right', anybody want to make a guess, too late...it was 'Queen for a Day" sponsored by Playtex and starred Jack Bailey.  It ran on CBS channel 2 in Los Angeles from 1956-1960 and on ABC channel 7 from 1960-1964.  The premise was each woman in the audience was given a questionairre and asked why they should be chosen 'Queen for a Day"  It seems the best 'sob' story got the prize.  The women interviewed asked for simple things, such as a hearing aid for their deaf child or a new refrigerator.  it was usually something that would make any housewife at the time happy, a washwer-dryer combo, a refrigerator etc  An applause meter determined the winner.  Upon winning, the chosen 'Wueen for a Day' was draped with a fur wrap and a tiara. Commercials featuring womans fashons were some of the sponsors.  The show morphed from 30 - 45 minutes as it became more popular.  Really obscure show rhat didn't have any similar spinoffs!

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@dolphin27 Hi,according to my TV show ref.book,the show "The Millionaire"  ran on CBS from '55-'60. Marvin Miller "Michael Anthony' was only cast member. He was the personal secretary of multi millionaire,JOhn Beresford,who's face was never seen on the show. Anthony's job was to give a unsuspecting person a cashier's ck for a million dollars,tax free,see how their lives changed. The one rule was,you couldn't try&find Mr. Beresford,or how you got the money.The only person you could tell was your spouse.If you told somebody else,you would have to forfeit the money.

I vaguely remember watching this show towards the end when I was 8. Sue

Walkers Take It All In Strides
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I see someone else beat me to the correction for "The Millionaire." Michael Anthony's unseen (but heard) employer was John Beresford Tipton. In my favorite remembered episode the check was deposited in a little girl's bank account. The parents thought it was a mistake but they found out by the end that it was real. Like most TV shows in those early days it was just a half-hour drama.

 

We had the first TV on our block when I was a kid. I can remember shows beginning from 1950, so many I've wanted to see again. There was a 1953 syndicated half-hour drama anthology, "Orient Express." There was "Stories of the Century," starring Jim Davis as a railroad detective who dealt with famous bandits of the old west. There was "I Married Joan," a marital sitcom with Joan Davis and Jim Backus, 1952-55. So many!

 

 

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@doglover52, Hey Sue...why do I remember the name of The Millionaire as John Beresford Tipton? I LOVED that show! Cat Happy N.

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@catwoman500 Hi Nancy,my mistake,you are correct. Tipton was the millionaire's last name. Sue

Walkers Take It All In Strides
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ve got anvery obscure other short run show from the mid 1950's that was kind of an audience game show where they selected an unsuspecting someone out of the audience, no it wasn't 'The Price is Right', anybody want to make a guess, too late...it was 'Queen for a Day" sponsored by Playtex and starred Jack Bailey.  It ran on CBS channel 2 in Los Angeles from 1956-1960 and on ABC channel 7 from 1960-1964.  The premise was each woman in the audience was given a questionairre and asked why they should be chosen 'Queen for a Day"  It seems the best 'sob' story got the prize.  The women interviewed asked for simple things, such as a hearing aid for their deaf child or a new refrigerator.  it was usually something that would make any housewife at the time happy, a washwer-dryer combo, a refrigerator etc  An applause meter determined the winner.  Upon winning, the chosen 'Queen for a Day' the lady was draped with a fur wrap and a tiara and music started playing.  The usual description of the prize from the manufacturer was mentioned, hey, it was a great 'plug' for their product!. Commercials featuring womans fashons were some of the sponsors.  The show morphed from 30 - 45 minutes as it became more popular.  A really obscure show rhat didn't have any similar spinoffs!  One more thing about this show, it was popular at the time as a 'game show' yet the contestants, random women chosen from the audience didn't need to have knowledge of trivia, like for Jeopardy or Who wants to be a millionaire!

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Just a few from late 40's to 60's:  Sergeant Preston of the Yukon; Annie Oakley;  I Love Lucy; Lassie; Rin Tin Tin; The Soupy Sales Show; Kukla, Fran and Ollie; The Early Riser (with Stu Kerr, WMAR Baltimore/PA area show); Amos n' Andy; The Honeymooners; Life of Riley; The Lone Ranger (I met Clayton Moore when he was in York, PA in the 50's.); Thriller, Panic; The Twilight Zone; Death Valley Days; Leave it to Beaver; Andy Griffith; original Mickey Mouse Club; Milton Berle show; The George Burns and Gracie Allen Show  

 

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Here's a real obscure one:  Does anyone recall 'Love that Bob' with Bob Cummings, Rosemary de Camp, Ann B Davis, (Aice on the Brady Bunch) and Nancy Kulp, (Ms. Hathaway on the Beverly Hillbillies).  Is aired from 1955 - 1959 in the evenings and later as a daytime show, the 'Bob Cummings Show', Bob Collins, was a photographer, Air Force officer and ladies man in Hollywood. He lived with his sister, Margaret Mc Donald played by Rosemary de Camp.  To round out this cast of zanys, Anne B Davis played his assistant Schultzy. Nancy Kulp played Bobs eccentric neighbor Pamela Livingstone. Dwayne Hickman,(The many loves of Dobie Gillis) played his nephew Chuck This show was produced , directed and created by Paul Henning, who did the Beverly Hillbillies, Petticoat Junction and Green Acres.  

 

And an even one more obscure: Anybody remember 'The Peoples Choice' with Jackie Cooper, who played a politician aspiring lawyer, Socrates AKA Soc Miller.   He was always accompanied by his loyal basset hound, sad looking, wise cracking 'Cleo', whose voice was by Mary Jane Croft, a sidekick of Lucille Ball. Margaret Irving was his aunt Gus (she was in the 1936 MGM classic 'San Francisco' as Della, a Barbary Coast Madame)  This is an oldie ran from 1955-1958 on NBC channel 4 in Los Angeles.  

 

Now for the most obscure sitcom that hasn't been shown in over 60 years due to objectiions of the NAACP: 'Amos and Andy' with Freeman Godsen as Amos Jones and Charles Correll as Andrew Hogg  AKA 'the Kingfish' Brown.  Amos and Andy started as a popular radio program in 1928 and through the 1940's portrayed a black family living in Harlem New York. It successfully transitioned to television in 1951.  Amos and Andy ran a taxicab company and were somehow always getting into mischief or falling short a few dollars! The television show as short lived from 1951 -1953.  This show was made at Hall Roach Studuios in Culver City California where my mother Marie worked for Hal Roach Jr. from 1936 - 1962. She was the last employee of the studio.  In 1961, Roach Studios, declared bankruptcy and as my mother was his head accountant - bookkeeper and well  versed in taxes, helped him settle the aspects of the bankruptcy.  The buildings are long gone.  The studio was on Washington Blvd at Robertson Avenue in downtown Culver City.  In fact, Roach Studios was one of the first businesses in Culver City, having opened in 1919, two years after its incorporation as an independent city within Los Angeles. There's a brass plaque near the sidewalk where the studio once stood, it reads" Site of Hal Roach Studios, Laugh Factory to the World" 1919 - 1962!  Such great memories and reminiscing of some of these long gone but not forgotten television gems!

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Replying to "Amos 'n Andy,

Don't forget the Kingfish's wife Sapphire:)

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've got another very obscure other short run show from the mid 1950's that was kind of an audience game show where they selected an unsuspecting female out of the audience, and no  it wasn't 'The Price is Right', anybody want to make a guess, too late...it was 'Queen for a Day" sponsored by Playtex and starred Jack Bailey.  It ran on CBS channel 2 in Los Angeles from 1956-1960 and on ABC channel 7 from 1960-1964.  The premise was each woman in the audience was given a questionaire and asked by Jack Bailey why they should be chosen 'Queen for a Day". It seems the best 'sob' story got the prize.  The women were nterviewed in front of the audience and asked for simple things, such as a hearing aid for their deaf child or a new refrigerator.  it was usually something that would make any housewife at the time happy, a washwer-dryer combo, a refrigerator, vacuum cleaner etc  An applause meter determined the winner.  Upon winning, the chosen 'Queen for a Day' was draped with a fur wrap and a tiara. Commercials featuring womans fashons were some of the sponsors.  The show morphed from 30 - 45 minutes as it became more popular.  Really obscure show rhat didn't have any similar spinoffs!

 
 
 
 
 
 
 
Silver Conversationalist
w972822m
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Re: Early TV programs Do You Re
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Back in the later '40s I remember my younger brother and I sitting on the living room floor in front of the little televsion watching the test pattern, then we pledged allegiance to our flag, and eventually the Howdy Doody show would come on.  That was our first experience with television.  In the late '50s part of the Howdy Doody cast put on a show at the local high school that I was then attending and they asked for volunteers to be ushers for the show.  I volunteered and was excited to be "working" for Howdy Doody and the cast. 

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Speaking of the DuMont Television Network, do you remember I TOBOR(ROBOT I in reverse). Saw it in Chicago in the late"40"s.
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