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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 41 of 50
@nyadrn wrote:
You can go and stay on the property for one to three days.. you can go to the social clubs, the club house, meet and speak to other residents and imho you can get a pretty good idea and sense of the place.. in the ones that I have gone to there is a distinct personality about each.  Can you find out everything.. no  but you cannot find that out about a neighborhood before buying a home either.

You'd have to time this right! I had to rent a townhouse in a large development, for the 10 months between when I sold my house in north Jersey, found a house on the shore & it was ready to move in. During that period, the ONLY neighbor I met, was in the adjacent townhouse, but although that place was large, it had no clubhouse or other shared amenities.


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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 42 of 50

Maybe this would work for folks who had previously been married for many years, and/or came from large families. For those of use who've enjoyed living alone for years, I don't think it would be so easy. I'd rather live in a teensy apartment by myself, than have to share space with unrelated co-habitors!


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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Aging Baby Boomers Becoming the Roommate Generation

ABC NewsThere was Felix-and-Oscar. There were The Golden Girls. Such arrangements--adults living with adult roommates--are about to get less comic and more common, say experts on housing and on the aging of the Baby Boom.

One pair of roommates—Carol Loper, 69, and Gerry Venable, 74—recently was profiled on the front page of the L.A. Times. An executive of the non-profit agency that put the two of them together, tells ABC News she sees the number of such households growing.

Rachel Caraviello, vice president of Affordable Living for the Aging (ALA), says that nationally there are about 130,000 households where the cohabiters are aged 50 or older, and where they have no familial relationship or romantic connection.

Caraviello views these arrangements as one more manifestation of the “sharing economy”: Here, one party typically is house-rich but cash-poor; and the other has money or services to contribute.

Rodney Harrell, PhD, a specialist on housing with the AARP’s Public Policy Institute, tells ABC News the range of agreements struck can include one party’s helping the other with shopping, transportation, cooking or informal care-giving. He believes there will be more demand for roommate and other sharing programs as the Baby Boom ages.

http://gma.yahoo.com/aging-baby-boomers-becoming-roommate-generation-164125441.html

 

I have heard several people here say that they would love this arrangement.

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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@ASTRAEA wrote:

The catch-22 is that unless you can spend a lot of time in an area, and participate in "resident activities" (as opposed to tourists/vacationers), you won't get the information they're suggesting. As they said, realtors can get in a lot of trouble, by sharing the sort of demographic/values information they're looking for, and I can't imagine how you go to a new area & meet with a psychologist, to find out if you'll "fit in".


You can go and stay on the property for one to three days.. you can go to the social clubs, the club house, meet and speak to other residents and imho you can get a pretty good idea and sense of the place.. in the ones that I have gone to there is a distinct personality about each.  Can you find out everything.. no  but you cannot find that out about a neighborhood before buying a home either.

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 45 of 50

I think, like most things in life, there is nothing that is perfect.  I know I have certainly thought about making a move, but each time I think what the move would be, I've stayed where I am.

 

My nearest relatives live in Seattle, all the way across country so if I were to move to be closer to family that would be quite a move, and expensive.  It would also be to a large city which is why I sold my house I had in Atlanta that I rented out for years thinking I might move back.  I don't want something that big again.

 

My present house is paid for, which makes it nice even with the upkeep, but it has 2 floors which means stairs.  However, I find I spend most of my time on the first floor and generally fall asleep on the sofa in front of the TV set, just like my father used to do.

 

As for entertaining friends.  I used to have a large circle of friends, many of whom were single and visited quite often.  However, things change.  Some, I'm sad to say have died.  Others have moved away and a couple have remarried and started new lives.  A few of these we still have lunch now and then or talk on the phone.  There are others that I feel nothing in common anymore.

 

I've decided the best thing for me is to make my situation work where I am.  I'm not doing well with making new friends in the real world but I have made some on line.  For me it's not the quantity of friends, but how much I enjoy those people and for that it doesn't matter where either of us happen to live.

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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 46 of 50

The catch-22 is that unless you can spend a lot of time in an area, and participate in "resident activities" (as opposed to tourists/vacationers), you won't get the information they're suggesting. As they said, realtors can get in a lot of trouble, by sharing the sort of demographic/values information they're looking for, and I can't imagine how you go to a new area & meet with a psychologist, to find out if you'll "fit in".


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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 47 of 50

@ASTRAEA wrote:

@SIMPLEGAL wrote:

Your post is very interesting.  I have found active adult communities to be primarily for "couples" and are expensive to buy.  I found one community "The Villages" in Florida that allows people to stay at one of their property hotels or homes and enjoy the community as a "getaway" or many homes are available for rent.  This place has everything and is amazing!  

http://www.thevillages.com

Unfortunately the link isn't working properly on this site. 

When an acquaintance bought in a Hovnanian Four Seasons (55+) development in south Jersey, she found out that it's mostly couples too, and being a single felt like a "5th wheel" socially. Like many similar developments, it's very large, and therefore was located where enough land was available & less expensive .. not near the existing town. So as residents age, they're more dependent on the development's mini-buses/schedule, to do all of their shopping .. it's the opposite of "walkable".

I have heard of The Villeges in Florida, and they're just another example of mega-developments (to me). I don't live in a large town now, and don't want to be in a large development, where residents have even less rights, than in dealing with an incorporated municipality


This is why there is no same answer for everyone..  you have to start with your own personal check list of what is important..  before I bought my current condo I spent weeks coming up with the check list and many more looking for the right property and once I found this place I have found it to be as close to perfect as possible for my needs.  I could stay here without issue unless I needed some type of advanced care..  however the winters are killers and I am determined to find a winter place.  So I have done the same thing.. worked up a list that is right for me and again this year I will be going to look at various communities in a better climate.  Each property is different.. the people are different, the facilities the location the friendliness for singles everything.  I have looked out west, down south and I am looking the the southeast this year.  Each time I evaluated my list of criteria.  Maybe I will find the place this year.  

The following article approaches the list in a little different way

 

"When it comes time to move to the suburbs, pick a town or settle in a new neighborhood, the checklist generally begins like this: Best school test scores. Most house for the money. Shortest commute.

There’s another way to do this, however, that may yield more happiness for less money. Call it a values audit.

This checklist includes scouting the drop-off zone at schools, eavesdropping shamelessly, figuring out where people swim in the summer, scanning the community’s bookshelves and pestering the local psychologist. The object is to figure out what a community really stands for and whether you would want to be friends with any of the people who live there.

Not every real estate agent provides that sort of information. Specialists in a single area don’t have much incentive to offer the warts-and-all download, or they may fear being accused of violating federal law that forbids steering buyers based on race.

But the questions are about shared values and how community-minded the residents are. So the answers will have to come from people who have been there (and perhaps left), and experts like Alison Bernstein, who has built a business called Suburban Jungle around guiding people to the places within commuting distance of New York City that suit them best."

Photo

 http://www.nytimes.com/2014/05/03/your-money/43-questions-to-ask-before-picking-a-new-town.html?rref...

 
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Re: Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 48 of 50

@SIMPLEGAL wrote:

Your post is very interesting.  I have found active adult communities to be primarily for "couples" and are expensive to buy.  I found one community "The Villages" in Florida that allows people to stay at one of their property hotels or homes and enjoy the community as a "getaway" or many homes are available for rent.  This place has everything and is amazing!  

http://www.thevillages.com 

Unfortunately the link isn't working properly on this site. 

 

When an acquaintance bought in a Hovnanian Four Seasons (55+) development in south Jersey, she found out that it's mostly couples too, and being a single felt like a "5th wheel" socially. Like many similar developments, it's very large, and therefore was located where enough land was available & less expensive .. not near the existing town. So as residents age, they're more dependent on the development's mini-buses/schedule, to do all of their shopping .. it's the opposite of "walkable".

 

I have heard of The Villeges in Florida, and they're just another example of mega-developments (to me). I don't live in a large town now, and don't want to be in a large development, where residents have even less rights, than in dealing with an incorporated municipality.


 

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Comment: Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 49 of 50

Dear Astrea,

Your post is very interesting.  I have found active adult communities to be primarily for "couples" and are expensive to buy.  I found one community "The Villages" in Florida that allows people to stay at one of their property hotels or homes and enjoy the community as a "getaway" or many homes are available for rent.  This place has everything and is amazing!  

http://www.thevillages.com 

Unfortunately the link isn't working properly on this site. 

 

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Housing Lifestyles as we Age Gracefully

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Message 50 of 50

I know we go thru this topic periodically, but I've been thinking about it again .. and where I might want to be, when I reach my 70s.

 

I moved from a single family house in north Jersey almost 6 years ago, to another single family house on the Jersey shore. I love my house, but I'm realizing that there aren't many singles 55 - 75 in my area, because many singles don't "want to be bothered" with home ownership, or give up their homes when they lose a spouse. I also learned that you can be "the hostess with the mostess," but married couple friends aren't as likely to socialize at your home, as with their other married friends .. or the husbands feel awkward & only the wives come to gatherings. So my hopes for an illustrious career as a hostess, with my beautiful home, haven't panned out.

 

So what are the options?

 

  • Active Adult Community - either they're compact & "vertical" (who wants to move into a 3+ level townhouse, when they're into their 70s?!), or cute free-standing homes, in a mega development, that's not at all walkable or integrated within a town.
  •  Small Single Family Home - Only found in walkable areas in multi-level townhouses, or in more non-walkable suburban settings. It's also hard to find "small" coupled with "upscale features", because of society & developer biases.
  • ???

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