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That AMAZING work-from-home opportunity may be a scam

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You receive a robocall about an amazing business opportunity. You can work from home and make hundreds, maybe even thousands, of dollars doing something simple, right from home. Sounds like a winning deal, right? Well, it's not.

How It Works

The work-from-home call may float the names of major companies ("You can make hundreds as an authorized Amazon affiliate," for example). Or the offer may be for you to work stuffing envelopes, doing data entry, or assembling crafts, among other things. Training isn't required, but, of course, you'll have to pay something upfront for supplies, certification, coaching, website design, client leads, etc. In return you may get a load of useless information, or nothing at all, or a demand that you place more ads to recruit more people into the scheme.

 

How It Works

The work-from-home call may float the names of major companies ("You can make hundreds as an authorized Amazon affiliate," for example). Or the offer may be for you to work stuffing envelopes, doing data entry, or assembling crafts, among other things. Training isn't required, but, of course, you'll have to pay something upfront for supplies, certification, coaching, website design, client leads, etc. In return you may get a load of useless information, or nothing at all, or a demand that you place more ads to recruit more people into the scheme.

 

What You Should Know

  • The Federal Trade Commission (FTC) receives roughly 10,000 complaints a year about work-at-home scams.
  • Don't assume work-from-home offers are real just because they have a website, appear in the newspaper, or even on a legitimate job site.
  • Website testimonials for these businesses are often fake, typically revolving around a struggling individual suddenly making lots of money after taking advantage of this amazing opportunity.
  • If your earnings are tied primarily on recruiting other people to join the operation, this is a pyramid scheme, not a job opportunity.


What You Should Do

  • Before you sign up or send any money, check out the company offering the job with your state consumer protection agency and with the Better Business Bureau.
  • Ask detailed questions. The FTC recommends you ask how you will be paid (such as by salary or commission), who will pay you and when, and exactly what you will get for any money you provide.
  • Learn about the FTC's Business Opportunity Rule, which requires companies to disclose key information about business opportunities they are selling.

If you have been targeted by this scam or have fallen victim, call the AARP Fraud Watch Network Helpline at 1-877-908-3360 for guidance and support.

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