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Re: Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

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@GailL1  Could not agree with you more.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

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@Epster wrote:

@GailL1 wrote:

In many senior complexes, Wi-Fi is provided.

Would you consider that, pubic or private?


@GailL1  I'd look upon that as public.

 


Me too, but many of those seniors don't think twice about doing their banking online or buying something with a credit card or worse yet,mother debit card.

These complexes need to give instructions about signing up for a VPN and/or restricting access unless they get one. 

* * * * * * * * *
MY SIGNATURE: "It’s Always something" - Roseanne Rosannadanna
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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

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@GailL1 wrote:

In many senior complexes, Wi-Fi is provided.

Would you consider that, pubic or private?


@GailL1  I'd look upon that as public.

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Valued Social Butterfly
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Re: Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

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In many senior complexes, Wi-Fi is provided.

Would you consider that, pubic or private?

* * * * * * * * *
MY SIGNATURE: "It’s Always something" - Roseanne Rosannadanna
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Is Public Wi-Fi Safe?

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Free public Wi-Fi, available at places like airports and coffee shops, are convenient, but can be risky.

 

How It Works:

Scammers monitor commonly used Wi-Fi network names, and set up their own “evil twin” access points in hopes your computer or device will automatically connect to it without your consent. Or they launch a “man in the middle” attack, by hacking in between you and your Wi-Fi connection. Their goal? To grab your emails, credit card numbers, and passwords.

 

What You Should Know:

 

Any data you send over free public Wi-Fi is vulnerable, so be thoughtful about how you use it.

 

What You Should Do:

 

  • Ask an employee at the location offering free public Wi-Fi for the name of the network. Don’t just assume that “free airport Wi-Fi” is a legitimate wireless network; it could have been set up by a hacker to trick you into connecting.
  • Stick to browsing the web, checking news, weather, or traffic when on public Wi-Fi. 
  • Avoid online banking, checking emails, making credit card purchases or even posting on social media on public Wi-Fi.
  • Check your device’s settings to make sure it doesn’t automatically connect to any free public Wi-Fi that you’re in range of.
  • If you find you use public Wi-Fi regularly, play it safe and sign up for a Virtual Private Network (VPN) that keeps your data secure.  Some are free, while others charge a subscription.  

 Do you use free Wi-Fi when it's available?

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