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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 21 of 34

NEVER buy software over the phone.  It normally has malware in it so they can steal you blind.

 

NEVER let anyone you don't know put software on your computer for the same reason.  If you see a threat on a computer screen press the off button until it goes off in a crash.  You might be screwed up due to the crash but the computer may not have time to install the software.

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 22 of 34

I just want to leave this 'out there'.  They all have and do change their caller ID so I am not really sure how you are going to report them.  If you have time it is your civic duty to try to keep them on your line as long as possible.  That is the only way you can fight back.

 

You can try calling them back.  If that person does answer you have a stupid one and yes report them and tell you called them back to verify the number.

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 23 of 34

Thank you for joining our conversation and for pointing out those scams. The Tech Support scam is one of the most common scams right now. Microsoft did research around 2015 and found out that billions of dollars had been lost to this scam. So thank you for warning the AARP online community.

 

A few things about this scam to keep in mind and to help you stay safe:

  • Computer companies don't proactively reach out to consumers to let them know about potential virus on consumer's computers.
  • If anyone calls asking to remote access into your computer, hang up.
  • If you receive a pop up on your screen telling you that there is a virus and you need to call a phone number, click out of the box, or you may even have to "hard shutdown" your system to get it to go away, but don't call the number or click on any links.
  • Never give personal or financial information to anyone who calls you, nor pay for any services like this, in pre-paid gift cards.

I'm joining the online conversation all week, so please let me know if any questions about frauds and scams. Amy

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Community Manager
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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 24 of 34

Good morning and welcome to the AARP Online Community!

 

This is a great chance to connect with an AARP Fraud & Scam expert.  Ask AARP Expert Amy Nofziger (@anofziger17) your questions and share your stories here!

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 25 of 34

I wanted to add to your scam list.  "A call from Sam Cooper (asian voice) with Microsoft.  Your computer has been hacked and we want to be sure that no valuable data has been compromised. May we have access to your computer."  (After accessing the computer. he sells you an anti-hacking program, shows the icon on the desktop to prove "authenticity."  Cost $199 vs Walmart's 2.29.  When you click on that icon, it's a trial version.)

Another:  call from NY official Lottery- - complete with claim number--to claim your winnings.

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 26 of 34

I think it's true, because I know of 2 people that used a credit card after the person died and did not have to pay it.  It's a loss to the credit card company.  The credit card company also said so, you don't have to pay it, it's under the deceased name.

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 27 of 34

I look forward to joining you on Monday April 23! Amy

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 28 of 34

Thanks for your comments Gail. There is no estate as it was set up as TOD (transfer upon death) although the house is selling for $500K. His daughter, the one I am describing, got ALL the belongings in the house and will get a portion of the sale of the house. She told me she is an authorized user and the customer service at the credit card said if she just said “NO” she wouldn’t have to pay anything on the $5000 balance. I suspect she isn’t being truthful about this at all This incenses me because we ALL pay for this. Plus my own mother died around the same time and we did the responsible thing and paid ALL her bills, knowing that is what she would want us to do. 

In the second example the wife was NOT an authorized user although I have since found out that some credit cards will waive paying the balance if the husbands death was on foreign soil. 

What surprises me about the first case is how there is nobody to report this fraud to. You would think there would be an easy way to report credit card fraud. Meanwhile they are buying new cars, taking trips and going on early retirement. 

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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 29 of 34

@lipintm

 

ANY unpaid debts of a person when they die are suppose to be paid out of their estate by their executor.  If they have no Will, various state laws govern the process and a personal representative is appointed to handle the matters.

 

As to your 1st example - when the death certificate is supplied to the credit card issuer, they will make an attempt to collect from the estate - if no estate, the authorized user could be on the hook for all charges but specifically for those made after the date of death.

 

Again, in your 2nd example - the estate of the deceased will be paying for the balance remaining on the credit card or if his wife was on the account as a joint holder or authorized user, the party left standing is responsible.

 

Creditors of all type know what to do to collect in most instances.  There aren't really any loopholes for honest people.

* * * * * * It’s Always Something - Roseanne Rosannadanna
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Re: Get your fraud and scam questions answered

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Message 30 of 34

I know two people now who have told me that they literally walked away from paying $5000 on a credit card bill! Is this legal? One person was an authorized user on her Dad’s card. Her father died and she literally charged the entire catering bill on his card for his memorial service 3 weeks after he died. She didn’t inform the credit card company that he died and when she did, they said she didn’t have to pay it. They told her the charges were on the “same billing cycle” and therefore didn’t owe anything. How is that legal? Is it legal but unscrupulous? The other example is a friends husband took a trip and died on that trip and all his credit card charges FOR the trip didn’t have to be paid by his spouse. Again, I feel we are ALL paying for these loopholes. Once people know this loophole I would imagine there will be many more people abusing it!

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