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Re: CarRental.com company is a Fraud tooCarRe

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CarRental.com is fraud company too. This company in Usa take your money and dont do refund, they has no way of claiming, no email direct, only an email controlled by them at yours convenience, no phone for claim in your main web page, you need to search a lot in your page, then they said that they call you but dont do it well is a liar, however in small letter have a phone number and if you want call them to this number never is attends, they public this in your web ""However If you would rather call us, you can do so by dialing +1-844-750-8180. Please have your Booking Confirmation ready as you will be asked for this. We’re happy to take your call, but by calling us, you will have longer wait times and longer call handling with our agents. All is a lair CarRental.com is a FRAUD NEVER USE THIS COMPANY FOR RENT A CAR

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Re: Car Rental Fraud

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This is rather a long story, but it happened about this time last year when I went on a visit to England. On arriving to pick up that vehicle, I was refused an opportunity to decline the CDW, only being allowed to take the car on payment of the additional CDW.
I was forced to pay for insurance I neither wanted nor required. The stated reason being that they required written proof that the credit card being used covered the insurance. There were three people ahead of me in the rental line who were forced to pay this unwanted charge and the person behind me, when they reached the desk, confirmed they were being forced into a similar charge. This was clearly not an isolated incident, but a deliberate scam that must have collected millions.
Further, they charged me a second time for the insurance, but since this was done without the chip, the credit card company recovered this.
On return to the US, I reported these events to AARP, fully expecting they would be deeply concerned and eager to take steps to ensure members did not continue to be defrauded.
There was an initial show of concern, but that disappeared quickly when I received a email denying my claim (I didn't realise I had made a claim, I was simply alerting AARP to the situation so they could protect their members). The reason stated for the denial was because the confirmation email informed me written proof was required for the credit card.
The email did, of course, contain no such statement or warning. Two return emails inviting them to show me where it contained that warning were ignored.
I posted a warning to others on the AARP travel forum and received an email from members@aarp.com requesting details, which I provided. Although I had confirmation that my reply had been received, no response in 3 weeks.
During this period I also performed a check and booked another car in England, subsequently cancelled, to determine if any sort of action had been taken.
Again the same company was coming up with the lowest price offers, one wonders if they were deliberately putting in low price offers to entice more victims. On booking I carefully read the confirmation page and email to determine if there was hidden anywhere a warning regarding requirements for declining CDW. The only information I could find, following links on pages etc stated that those wishing to decline CDW need take no other action. Exactly the opposite of the policy being enforced at the rental desk. I have little doubt that had I actually wished to take up this reservation, I would again have been a victim.
That company is called Easirent in the UK but appears to be part of the Fox car rental group.
The continued silence from AARP on this matter makes it abundantly clear that within the AARP organisation it is well known exactly what is happening and that I was allowed to make my initial reservation while AARP knew perfectly well that I, or any other of its members, would be defrauded in this manner.
I sent a letter to this effect to the office of the CEO, Jo Ann Jenkins, again, no response, so clearly this is sanctioned at a very high level within the organisation.
This is not really what I had expected from an organisation that claims to support and protect the elder members of society from scams and abuse. To say it is deeply worrying really doesn't describe the feeling. If they are happy to allow members to be exposed to this sort of fraud, how deep does it go, who can be trusted.

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Re: Car Rental Fraud

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@p316296dwrote:

I just spotted this forum regarding scams and fraud and since I am in the process of booking travel, I thought it appropriate to ask.

Can AARP assert that they have discontinued their policy from last year where members could book car rentals through AARP and where AARP were fully aware that at the arival at the car rental office, that member would be defrauded by being forced to pay for unneeded Collision Damage Waiver or be denied a car.

On reporting this last year, it very quickly became clear that AARP were prefectly well aware that this was happening and representatives were clearly ordered not to communicate on this topic with those who brought it to their attention.

Even a letter to the office of the CEO went unanswered, showing that this policy of aiding and abetting frauders was sanctioned at the highest level.

I t would be good to know that the organisation takes fraud and scams seriously and isn't just offering a forum like this to attempt to fool members into believing they care!


 Interesting. While I have not booked a car rental through AARP,  I do utilize rental cars on an ongoing basis. My experience, they certainly apply the pressure to purchase this insurance, I always decline, but have never been denied the rental.

It would be helpful If the name of the offending rental company would be known.

My pet pieve with car rentals-the lowball price shown,and the actual price after all the excessive/unecessary fees are added in.   On some short term rentals final price is more than double the price t they Advertise.

Remember back when the airlines used the same dastardly tactic.  The government wisely mandated they show the total price-after taxes and fees. 

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Car Rental Fraud

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Message 4 of 4

I just spotted this forum regarding scams and fraud and since I am in the process of booking travel, I thought it appropriate to ask.

Can AARP assert that they have discontinued their policy from last year where members could book car rentals through AARP and where AARP were fully aware that at the arival at the car rental office, that member would be defrauded by being forced to pay for unneeded Collision Damage Waiver or be denied a car.

On reporting this last year, it very quickly became clear that AARP were prefectly well aware that this was happening and representatives were clearly ordered not to communicate on this topic with those who brought it to their attention.

Even a letter to the office of the CEO went unanswered, showing that this policy of aiding and abetting frauders was sanctioned at the highest level.

I t would be good to know that the organisation takes fraud and scams seriously and isn't just offering a forum like this to attempt to fool members into believing they care!

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