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Re: AARP Selling Our Info to Scammers?

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@FredSmif wrote:

Back in university I learned the Latin "post hoc ergo propter hoc".

Which translates to "after this, therefore because of this".

 

 

Meaning that just because some action occurs after some recent event does not definitely prove a relationship, let alone causation.

 

I'm very familiar with the phrase. In fact I have two different stories based on it in my new book "The Phallus of AGILE and Other Ruminations" (Which may be getting a title change to "The Minimum You Need to Know About the Phallus of AGILE")

 

That deflection is of little use here.

 

Certainly it may be that AARP sells the membership lists. I have no idea if they do or not. Jeez, what is my grand membership fee? $10 a year or something? not high finance.

 

They do and herein lies the rub. They aren't properly vetting who they sell our information to.

I really don't answer the phone lines here and most of my email goes to the spam bin. There are all sorts of scams out there, people just wanting to get me to give them money somehow, someway. I am aware and hold tight onto my wallet (ha). I think I get my 10 bucks a year worth from AARP.

You can certainly run this issue up the hierarchy at AARP. Ask them if this is done and post back here. It should be interesting.

This has nothing to do with answering the phone lines. These criminals leave voice mail. It is a scam targetted at older people (AARP members) and they leave messages five or more times per day.

 

The one pitfall in their attempt at criminal fraud is they need to display the Apple support number (Actually any of the Apple numbers) for caller ID. This did eventually allow me to block all of the calls.

 

 

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Re: AARP Selling Our Info to Scammers?

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Right on!  The government should not be involved in student loans.  Let colleges lend the money and then be responsible for defaults.  Again, AARP's resolution to the problem is lay it on the taxpayer.  Why not go after colleges and universities for the obscene tuition they charge?  Why should I subsidize someone who someday will earn twice as much money as I do?  Add to that the fact that institutions of higher learning these days are nothing but liberal thought factories.  AARP turns Conservatives like me off when they recommend government bailouts.  Does AARP think people are stupid and don't realize that when government bailouts are promoted it ultimately falls on the taxpayer?

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Re: AARP Selling Our Info to Scammers?

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Message 3 of 4

Back in university I learned the Latin "post hoc ergo propter hoc".

Which translates to "after this, therefore because of this".

 

Meaning that just because some action occurs after some recent event does not definitely prove a relationship, let alone causation.

 

Certainly it may be that AARP sells the membership lists. I have no idea if they do or not. Jeez, what is my grand membership fee? $10 a year or something? not high finance.

 

I really don't answer the phone lines here and most of my email goes to the spam bin. There are all sorts of scams out there, people just wanting to get me to give them money somehow, someway. I am aware and hold tight onto my wallet (ha). I think I get my 10 bucks a year worth from AARP.

You can certainly run this issue up the hierarchy at AARP. Ask them if this is done and post back here. It should be interesting.


Edit:   Okay, I'm going to edit this to add that I think much of the "shopping" items presented to AARP members via the magazines, etc, (eg: phones, computers, traveling, etc) are very possibly not the best item/service available and may not be the most economical either. That's just my opinion based on observation of the ads themselves and on comments (complaints) made on these AARP forums. But are these "scams"? Not really. But buyers should be very aware and shop around, and should not believe that the items/services are actually vetted by AARP...I doubt that they are.

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AARP Selling Our Info to Scammers?

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A few Saturdays ago I joined AARP. The following Monday I had 5 voicemails from (800) 275-2273. On Tuesday they called numerous times but only left messages on 3 occassions. Wednesday it was back up to 5. All claimed to be from AppleCare.

 

Having worked over 30 years in IT I won't own any Apple products. They are not  a technology company, they are a cult. Only an idiot pays north of $1000 for $200 worth of parts they can hold in their hand.

 

This is a scam targetting older people and I have to say they are getting AARP membership information. In their haste to make a fast buck AARP hasn't been too selective in who they sell are information to.

 

I have _never_ receive this phone scam until the first working day after joining AARP. The number of calls and messages seems to have trailed off to 3 or fewer per day now.

 

Don't get me wrong, I get

  • "Weeendose Company" calling to inform me my license has expired.
  • The IRS issuing an arrest warrant unless I pay X-thousand dollars.
  • Both Weeendose and Microsoft technical support calling to ask me to grant them access to my computer so they can remove a virus they found.
  • 18,000 "business loan" companies willing to give me $250,000 unsecured money today

 

Probably a few others I don't remember.

 

The AppleCare scam which targets older Americans started the first business day after joining AARP.

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