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Re: Why retirement is a flawed concept: ikigai

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Speaking as a person quickly nearing my retirement date, I observe that retirement is similar in many ways as the pre-retirement life. Sure, many of the strict work commitments are gone. That leaves more time that is now in the retiree’s hands rather than the employer. Given that, it appears that when the retiree has done some groundwork and planning that his/her retirement life will be more rewarding. I observe that people with a purpose in life are much happier and generally healthier. Maybe my opinion is tainted by my background and experiences. I know everyone is different. I recognize that I somehow need some structure in life. I am looking forward to creating that structure knowing that I can change it at will and not have my boss and employer do it as it happens today. -- Tom

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Re: Why retirement is a flawed concept: ikigai

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I would add that the giving of yourself doesn't necessarily have to be part of a group experience.  A simple letter to a person in need, visiting a sick friend, calling a person who is home bound... All of these will help pull the focus off your own concerns and worries and will fill you with a sense of worth and purpose.  As a physical therapist with over thirty years of experience I have noticed that those patients who recovery the best and have the best attitude about life in their later years are usually engaged in someway in giving their time and talents to others.  

Lon     www.livewellafter60.com

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Re: Why retirement is a flawed concept: ikigai

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    I would disagree to the generalization. I don't think the concept is flawed. I think the retirees, who do not think the process through, are flawed.

    Yes, there is (it seems from what I read), fewer and fewer people who can afford to retire. That's a major issue, with many aspects, in itself.

     It's the people who can afford it, do retire, then realize (often fairly quickly), that they are bored and unhappy, which the article discusses. I mostly attribute that to people who think they must retire because they have aged to some 'magic number', but don't have plans for retirement.

   There are just so many aspects to retirement. Finances, health, personal circumstances (friends, family, spouse, or lack thereof), where one lives and the opportunities there are (or not), interests (or lack thereof), etc.    


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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Why retirement is a flawed concept: ikigai

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https://hbr.org/2016/04/why-retirement-is-a-flawed-concept

 

The news item came across my desk this morning. The title enticed me. It's quite a good article on the importance of retiring with a purpose and passion to life. The author does a nice job of pointing out that retirement years are times when you can do what you really want to do and have a real purpose for life. I can say that although I have had a good job and career, it's not my passion. The following paragraphs below from the article really spoke to me...

 

"To put it another way: We don’t actually want to retire and do nothing. We just want to do something we love. And I’m not talking about endless days of back nines, fishing, and sailing into the sunset. While we might want some time to do those things, you’d be surprised to learn how quickly the bloom can come off of that type of rosy retirement. I believe that we’d all be better served by taking the concept of ikigai and distilling it into what I call the 4 S’s:

 

  1. Social: Friends, peers, and coworkers who brighten our days and fulfill our social needs.
  2. Structure: The alarm clock ringing because you have a reason to get up in the morning, and the resulting satisfaction you get from earned time off.
  3. Stimulation: Keeping our minds challenged by learning something new each day.
  4. Story: Being part of something bigger than ourselves by joining a group whose high-level purpose is something you couldn’t accomplish on your own."
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