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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 31 of 40
It's not a requirement! Enjoy what you do.....I've been at it for 13 months and I look at it as a new phase. I also have a open minded wife that is still working....
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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 32 of 40
I have been retired now for two years , I am now 63 years old and enjoy knowing I have no time schedule to follow and no bosses to bother me. I do what I want when I want , there is more then enough to do in retirement !!!! Retirement is strictly up to each individual according to their responsibilities and monetary capacities. With a little planning, no is no reason anyone should not retire as early as possible and ENJOY THE REST OF YOUR LIFE..... HAVE SOME FUN !!!!!!!! While you can still remember it ......
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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 33 of 40

MY goal is to find a job that I love.  I am 61...and recently divorced and am now starting over. and I mean starting over... NO house or job.  If I love what I do I will be happy to do it as long as I feel fulfilled and busy and...  there is a lot to do, working or not... classes, volunteering and travel not to mention family.  Life is full of adjustments.  and we make the most out of each situation.

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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 34 of 40

I retired, then found another job using the same skill set. The idea of retiring just doesn't really appeal to me. I love having a sense that I'm needed and fulfilling a role that serves others. So long as my health permits, I plan to continue working.  I could complain that I can't afford to, but I don't because I really don't want to retire.  Perhaps I will reach a point in the future when I will opt to cut back my work to part time, but right now that isn't anything I want to do.

 

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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 35 of 40

The question of "Where are all the future jobs going to come from?" is a very real one. Amongst the Boomers I know, there is a small but definite percentage that found their jobs simply eliminated, or replaced by lower-cost aggregated positions that could be filled by younger employees with better tech or otherwise specialized skills.

 

That percentage will only increase for Millennials as robotics technologies continue to advance rapidly.

 

I loved my career, and was very good at it. But it was not highly valued and the cost benefit could be statistically quantified. Therefore, salary and promotion caps were first put in. Then positions began to be consolidated until it reached the utter absurdity of a group of 20 South American administrative assts supported the managers and senior managers of forty separate office across the US, totaling 4,000 execs.

 

Add in the time zone difference, and as one could expect, the execs have become accustomed to no real support at all. They do their own scheduling, their own travel, their own phones. Sounds efficient? It isn't.

 

I worked for the C-level execs: partners, CEO/CIO/CFO execs. I could take at least 60-75% of those time-consuming duties off their shoulders. At least 20% of the time I could handle the problems without even asking the exec. My cost to the companies was about 3-5% of what the exec made hourly.

 

I saw years in advance what was going to happen to my job, and got out at the top. I watched salaries fall dramatically, and they have never recovered. There are still high-paying Exec. Asst. jobs, but you work 12 hr days with a lot of stress. Been there, done that, not worth it any longer.

 

Mind you, I loved my execs (various companies) and most of them are still good friends. One has gotten into winemaking and we're members of his wine club! I was even asked back three times by one of them, a great compliment since by that time he was Regional Director for the entire West Coast and could have had any EA he wanted.

 

My spouse and I never made a lot of money separately. Even combined, a good number of our friends/family out-earned us. What we did that was smart was start our financial planning in our late 40's. It really helped us recover from some bad mistakes and got us into a successful early retirement.

 

A good financial plan mitigates risk and adapts to changing circumstances. Despite the Great Recession we had no problems retiring as planned. Too many people refuse to get professional help but never understand how to stress-test their assumptions. A couple of emergencies and they can't recover. We've watched it happen to people we know, but we can't help them.

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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 36 of 40

I don't expect to retire either. Past cancer and eldercare wipes out all savings, but I love what I do in work.  So as long as I'm strong enough to handle it, I'm jazzed about it.

.

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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 37 of 40

I think retiring early is clue here.  I retired at age 53 to be a full time caregiver and "the person in charge of everything" for my stepfather, my mother and grandmother.  I was full of plans as to what I wanted and needed to do  and still  am.    I think it is harder to develop new routines after a certain age.

hoc voluērunt
Gaius Julius Ceasar
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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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@bw95562019 wrote:
thats great that you have that situation. i always wonger if i would get bored if i retire. i too love what i do but my work has more physical demands so i dont know how long i can keep doing it. but will keep going till i cant.

A friend of mine worried about "getting bored" too, and worked beyond 65, until her industry began cutting hours on administrative staff to part-time. Retired several years now, she's never been busier & enjoying her life. She joined the local active senior center, and goes on trips with them, and has joined several other special interest senior groups in her area. It gives her more relaxed time with grandchildren, because she isn't exhausted juggling them & a job.

 

I retired very young, because I was burned out at work, and knew I'd be spening my first few years as a caregiver. After that, I was actually thrilled to "be bored" for a while, but really wasn't because I began house hunting in another area. Since my relocation, I've been involved with several organizations, volunteering & taking leadership positions, as well as taking classes as strikes my fancy.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
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Re: Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 39 of 40

thats great that you have that situation. i always wonger if i would get bored if i retire. i too love what i do but my work has more physical demands so i dont know how long i can keep doing it. but will keep going till i cant.

dont take life too serious
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Why I'm Never Retiring—And Why You May Not, Either

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Message 40 of 40

[Note: This content originally appeared as a blog post on Newswire.net on June 18, 2015.]

 

Do you love how you make your living? If you do, why in the world would you stop doing (and getting paid) for it if you didn't have to do so?

 

If you’re at or close to retirement age right now, I bet you’re at least a bit apprehensive. Who wouldn’t be, with all the media blather about retirement being impossible for many if not most of us, thanks to multiple recent episodes of economic…unpleasantness?

 

Well, I’m not. Because I have made peace with the idea that I may never retire. In fact, instead of worrying that I may never be able to retire, I’m looking forward to never retiring.

 

Why? First of all, because I love what I do. I get paid to think, write, present and collaborate with smart, interesting, collegial people about things that fascinate me. Mostly business and technology-related things, in case you're wondering. And many of those same things make it possible for me to work anytime from almost anywhere. Have laptop, tablet, smartphone and Internet connectivity, will travel—and work.

 

Second, because I've been doing it successfully for more than 35 years, and gotten to work from home for most of that time. So I'm either good at it, or really good at fooling a lot of really smart people. That second option seems a lot less likely.

 

Third and most important, there’s no reason I can’t continue to do the work I love and am good at for as long as I can continue to ambulate, cogitate, communicate and take nourishment. (Many of those same media pontificators railing about the impossibility of traditional retirement have also been saying things like “60 is the new 40” a lot, after all. AARP and other senior-watchers delight in pointing out, many of us are living and working longer than our parents and grandparents did. Heck, companies are already marketing robotic exoskeletons for humans that make heavy objects seem weightless, offering construction workers the prospect of active careers into their 60s and 70s.)

 

So while I may never be able to afford to stop working entirely, the good news is that if I can stay healthy, I can likely continue working indefinitely. And I get to do work that I enjoy, from wherever I happen or want to be most. Given all of that, as long as I can keep working productively and enjoyably, and continue to be paid for doing so, I see no reason to stop.

 

What about you?

 

Michael Dortch is founder, principal analyst and managing editor at DortchOnIT.com, "an independent voice for technology-dependent people" and consultancy to users and providers of disruptive business technologies. He is also a certified instructor and trainer for SnappConner PR's Content University program. Michael has been translating what technologists say and do into information non-technologists can understand and use since 1979. In 2010, he made the inaugural list of the “Top 500 Analysts Using Twitter”—twice. Learn more at www.DortchOnIT.com.

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