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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 21 of 32

This sounds great. Glad you are enjoying doing it as well. Please comment from time to time on other ways you have found for downsizing. Although an investment, another way to have less is to have multi-purpose tools around the house so you do not need as big of a toolbox or bag to be kept there.

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Message 22 of 32

Excellent and inspiring article. I need to downsize as well. Thanks.

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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 23 of 32

I do understand that living "tiny" is a good option for people who don't need a lot of breathing room and like being in closed-quarters. Having less keeps things simple, too.

Almost 19 years ago, we were very fortunate to "downsized" financially.  Our former house was 25 years old [at time of sale, yr. 2000] required lots of structural repairs and it had a higher mortgage pymt, association fees, property taxes and the commute to work was longer, and the land was leasehold with option to purchase.

Our current house has a smaller footprint as it is 2-story rather than 1 story... even though it is larger [by 200 sq. ft] and the lot is larger by 2000 sf. than the former house + lot.  It was "new" when we bought it in 2000. It is also on leasehold land, but the cost is minimal compared to the former home. Our neighborhood is much better too, more friendlier and closer to work even though it is in a rural area.

As a result, we saved $$ regularly from having a lower cost-of-living and paid-off the mortgage [last year] while also contributing to our retirment savings. Even during the 2008 recession, when my spouse lost his job, we were able to continue living in our home. He got a full-time job in 2012, after 18 months of being unemployed. He is retiring in 2 months @ age 70. So, both of us will be officially retired.

It's possible to live in a "regular" size, 3 bedroom home and keep it uncluttered.  We regularly donate what can be re-used and only purchase what we really need. But, we're not people with a lot of stuff either. A tiny home, I think, would cramp our style.  We like to have room enough to breathe with indoor and outdoor living spaces. Fortunately, we can have both space and an affordable lifestyle in our retirement years. My parents also "stayed" in their "ranch" style home until they passed on.

But, times are changing. People are becoming more highly mobile. Neighborhoods with long-term residents seem to become more rare too. If it's a possibility, I think there's something to be said for being able to live in-one place.

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Message 24 of 32

We live in a small Class motorhome in the winter in AZ.  Back home in the Midwest we have a large home full of "stuff."

I need to learn to apply my limited winter items and wardrobe to my seasons in the large home.  I do NOT need all those things.   My kids do not want any family heirlooms or collectibles.  Hard to give them away when I have so much sentiment attached to them .

Help please. 

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Message 25 of 32

WeI have our large 5 bedroom 2 story home with large yard and pool as well as a small 2 bedroom townhouse for weekend get-away.  Our kids are grown and one of them asked if he and his friends could rent the big house and we would live in the smaller one.   It was a win-win since they got to live in a nicer home/neighborhood than they would be able to otherwise and we get rent to help get ready for retirement.  However, we had 23 years of STUFF that we had never gone through because we had enough space for everything.  It has been 6 months of almost daily trips to Goodwill, full garbage cans, charity pickups and large garbage collection from the city.  We are not done yet, but I think it is a good exercise.  I say that the house is losing weight.  It is hard, but feels good.

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Message 26 of 32

Will enjoy the read

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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 27 of 32

Perfect timing with this article! Smiley Happy Since our Son was an infant, we have rented HOUSES because of the school district we're in. Problem with that is the Landlords were 'off-site' and the utility bills were astronomical.  This last September we moved to a complex that covers Heat & Hot Water. 

       It's not a Tiny house but, shoeboxes are roomier...still, we cleaned out old books, toys, hardware, and stuff that had laid dormant for 10 years. In order to help decide what to keep, I came up with a  'Archive or Donate' sorting method.

    We still have a storage bin (shopped around for the cheapest/most feasible one) and we deducted $12,000 (all 'Thrift shop value' determined).

 

As time marches on, that which is archived will be auctioned off (washer & dryer are only3 years old...) and we won't need as large a storage bin either...

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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 28 of 32

 Thanks for everyone's KUDOS and hope those others who read this took some useful information away. I plan to create a BLOG website about this because of all the great feedback I have received about it on my Facebook page. Anyone wishing more detailed information with links please comment here. Thank you all for your kind words and support. BTW a MINIMALISM, Tiny Living Lifestyle does not require you to relocate into a tiny. You can begin by downsizing what you own. Take one room at a time, start in a closet or for many of you that have them, your garage, your attic, and/or your cellar. Have fun and remember when you give something away someone else who needs it will greatly appreciate your kindness and generosity. It can make a big difference in their life. So never be afraid to discard something. 

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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 29 of 32

I’d love living in such close quarters.................for about an hour or so!  

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Re: Tiny Living

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Message 30 of 32

Thank you for your comments. Saving money and having less to do allows you to travel if you wish.

Having less to do allows us more time to do what it is we enjoy and want to do. Let me know if you want more info about tiny living. I will be posting more about how selling many of your household items not only helps to eliminate them, it also allows you to make some additional income. Also, you can donate items and write them off on taxes if necessary. After all how many pairs of shoes can you wear at once? The same goes for other articles of clothing. It is also an opportunity for parents to pass down items to the children they wish to have them and it eliminates the responsibility for children to go through parent's items once they have passed over. Message me for more info if any of you wish. I look forward to your replies and comments in here also.

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