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Re: Retirement: Month two

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It's true, the first few months to a year after you retire could be challenging. Very difficult to adjust to a routine of work, then shifting to a huge flexibility in time. Focusing in keeping yourself fit and healthy, and doing some charity work is already wonderful, not to mention very inspiring. Why not take a class of a passion or interest that you weren't able to focus on when you were still working? You might use it in setting up a dream business or something that will be very rewarding for you. All the best to you.
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Re: Retirement: Month two

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I too find myself getting annoyed at people that fail to attempt to help themselves. Was quite happy to see someone else has that problem..LOL 

 

I retired due to medical issues and would still be working full-time (actually a lot of overtime) if I were capable.  I have found myself playing video games online, or reading far too many books to the exclusion of doing anything productive  the first year. My second year I got off my duff and started volunteering.  That made things easier for this type AA with a schedule. 

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Re: Retirement: Month two

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My husband had been retired for at least 5 years before I was eligible to retire from Civil Service.  As soon as I met the age and time in service requirements I was out of there and haven't regretted the decision yet.  I do miss the interaction with the people at work but I compensate for that in other ways.  I have been retired 4 years the end of this month.  It doesn't seem like that long ago.

 

I volunteer at our local hospital two mornings a week and I take part in some of the Senior Circle activities once a month.  We are also able to travel whenever we feel like it.  I also had some health issues that have had to be taken care of.  I had knee replacement surgery two years ago and was glad to have it done.  Now we are trying to decide if we want to move closer to one of our kids and I am working on getting my house ready if we decide to sell.  Time flies.

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Re: Retirement: Month two

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I have been retired for 1 year. The first few months were the hardest to adjust to.

Now I sleep till about 8 am. Breakfast is usually Juices ( diced mango, pineapple, spinage with a little OJ in a Juicer).

I have fired the garderner so I get a good workout doing gardening twice a week (Tue and Thurs.)

I mow the lawn with a push mower and trim the grass with the weed wacker. I love spending time with my rose bushes.

I pick up my grand daughter from Pre school and take her to the baby-sitter from 10 - 11. We usually get lunch together.

When I return home I go through my email and read AARP (check out the AARP Rewards Program).

I love Dr. Oz and so I watch his show from 2 - 3 whild doing laundry and/or dishes.

From 3 - 4 it is really nice to read, meditate, do Tai-Chi, Yoga or take an afternoon nap.

Around 5 I begin to prepare dinner. 2 - 3 evenings my husband and I go to the gym.

In between events I crochet and play the internet games of sudoku, pyramid solitare saga, candy crush etc. These games keep your mind alert.

Remember retirement is your reward for working. Your job now is to focus on YOU! Learn to relax, take it slow and ENJOY the sunsets.

 

 

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Re: Retirement: Month two

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Well I have been retired for 10 years now and I retired at my full benefit year (born 1939).  My motto has been "so much to do so little time" Smiley Happy and "it can always wait until tomorrow". I have 18 flower gardens and a large veggie garden so Spring, Summer and Fall are always busy. I also have an outdoor train layout (otherwise known as a garden railroad except mine runs through my woods). There is always work to do on that.... buildings to refurbish, track to level, trains to run. I also belong to a Garden Railroaders Club (I am the treasurer and the only woman) and we do 5 displays a year at various local shows (two or three days) the longest being the day after Thanksgiving through to the weekend after New Years. We do this at a local Auto Museum and sponsor with them for Toys for Tots. January, February and March are usually slow months unless we have a good winter (then I plant my peas St. Patty's Day). I usually can think of a new building I or the club can use so I get out my handy tools and build during the winter (I built most of my buildings).Otherwise I read books, watch TV or movies and play here on my computer when it is too dark to be outside (or too hot). Life is good...love retirement...time flies so fast (the youngest of my 4 great-grandchildren is in 4th grade this year). My advice....do what you love and take time to "smell the roses'...you are retired and time is on your side.

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Re: Retirement: Month Eight

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My husband and I planned to retire if the Affordable Care Act became law.  When it did, we knew we would be able to have health insurace before the age of 65.  Due to downsizing, we were both working jobs beneath our level of achievement just to make ends meet.  Now that we are retired, we have created a nature club and are busy leading bird walks and shoreline clean-ups. We are active on various civic campaigns in our community.  It is great to have the chance to do good before we are too advanced in age to do more.

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Re: Retirement: Month two

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OK, I"m on "Year Two"...and life is great.  Like others, I retired when my work was no longer fun (and no longer bearable!).  I planned to "de-clutter" for the first 6 months.  Well, that is definately a long term goal...  I then began to volunteer at a veterans service organization and found the fun in work that had long been missing in my real work life.  I meet friends, do things on days just the opposite from when I worked, volunteer and just all in all am having a wonderful retirement!  Relish the opportunities the next generation may not have.

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Re: Retirement: Month two

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retiredtraveler wrote:

"....One of the things I really miss about getting ready for retirement is tracking my financial progress in Quicken....."..

 

  I know what you mean by 'miss':  the time, and interest, to track finances.

 

  I spent a great deal of time in an Excel spreadsheet to account for all expenditures, right down to the penny, over several years. I used that as a base to extrapolate future expenses trying to see how we might fare in retirement. Of course, looked at how the investments were going.

 

    I don't do much of anything with the finances now except daily reads on the economy and markets and checking the brokerage account.

 

   This winter I will be overstimulated learning about Medicare and supplemental insurance. I won't be missing that, once it's done.   Smiley Sad    


Since all my income is from investments, until I begin collecting my pension & SS, it fluctuates significantly from month to month. I used to track income & projected expenses on a monthly basis, to identify months were there were "gaps" for which I had to prepare. But after a while it just seemed like an unnecessary administrative chore, because I knew which months those were. Ironically, my income is the lowest, the months when I have the most bills .. but I keep a high enough balance in my checking account, that it doesn't matter.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
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Re: Retirement: Month two

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"....One of the things I really miss about getting ready for retirement is tracking my financial progress in Quicken....."..

 

  I know what you mean by 'miss':  the time, and interest, to track finances.

 

  I spent a great deal of time in an Excel spreadsheet to account for all expenditures, right down to the penny, over several years. I used that as a base to extrapolate future expenses trying to see how we might fare in retirement. Of course, looked at how the investments were going.

 

 

   I don't do much of anything with the finances now except daily reads on the economy and markets and checking the brokerage account.

 

   This winter I will be overstimulated learning about Medicare and supplemental insurance. I won't be missing that, once it's done.   Smiley Sad

    


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
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Re: Retirement: Month two

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ASTRAEA wrote:
Richva wrote:

One of the things I really miss about getting ready for retirement is tracking my financial progress in Quicken.  I would post activity daily, track stocks, purchase stocks on paydays.  Now, I still post it all but since the lady and I have had to abandon our "separate sets of books" approach, it just is not the same. 


I guess I don't understand; is "the lady" your wife? Why would you have to abandon whatever bookkeeping method you had before?

I've always done end-of-week updates for my equities, and monthly updates for my bonds; that's more than enough administrative effort! I have a friend who's a bit obsessive about it; he has fewer investments (but larger amounts in each), and he updates everything daily .. that's way too much for me.


 

"The lady" is my wife.  After years of co habitation and owning a house together we decided to make it official.  I still track things but my motivations and inputs have changed. She pays the bills now and has the salary.  I still track all incomes and outgoes but have not quite come up with a paradigm for the new accounting world.  It will come. 

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