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RV LIVING FULLTIME

Hello, 

 

We are looking into selling our house and living in a RV Fulltime, travel the country for 1-2 years. Looking to hear from people have done it or are going through it. If there are Recommendations on blogs and books with this topic, that would be great. What are the best States to make it your home state (tax wise), and to register your RV? How easy or difficult is this journey? Any other tax breaks when taking this step? Other things that come in mind is doctors, dentists other specialist.

 

Thanks for the feedback 

 

Vince

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Newbie

Hi everybody. We have been trying to sell our home for 2 years now. We updated the whole house and lowered it to what it is accessed at. We cannot wait to go fulltime. I have many friends that live all over the US that we want vist. This is our plan. Hope to meet everyone soon.

Regular Social Butterfly

Thumbs up to all those who posted. This sounds exciting and perhaps one day I will travel, meet new people and share good memories with new friends!

 

Wishing you safe journeys, many blessings and abundance of joy!

Contributor

We purchased our first RV years ago and traveled to warmer climates and work camped for several years. In the summer we returned to our home base in the North Country to maintain lawns etc. it is a big move and I would recommend trying the seasonal RVing for at least a year to see if you like the lifestyle and are ready to cut ties with home, stuff, friends and community. Prepare to go minimal and enjoy each other. Be sure that you define the expectation you each have for household chores, cooking, alone time, hobbies, etc. write it out so you can really be certain you can live with the other persons expectations and needs. Aging presents more challenges as abilities begin to lessen. Talk it out...all the what if’s you can think of and again write it down and think about your needs and your partners needs. After all,if you are not happy individuals it won’t matter where you are parked.
Contributor

What if you're like me? I am single, live alone on $1523/month SSDI. My rent, cable, utilities have all gone up. I cannot afford to live here anymore (NJ). I have thought of RVing full time out of my car but since this is depression and not a physical disability, I have to go 2x month for counseling. That is my hold up. How do I do that without the SSA deeming me mentally fit because I am "seeing the country"?

 

I've thought of moving to someplace cheaper like, SC, but I have heard that the SSA adjusts benefits accordingly.

 

Anyone have any thoughts and suggestions?

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Contributor

My advice is that you check out EVERYTHING about where you want to relocate...taxes, State rates for license and fees, regulations for whatever rig you might end up buying and quality of medical care available for your disability (or any other) issues. 

I knew a fellow who work-camped alone for years, he traveled with his little dog and lived in a Class C motor home. He made friends and was able to get on his feet emotionally and is now successfully working at a career he loves. 

If you are working state to state be certain to set your state of residence as one where there is no income tax or you could end up paying income tax in two states. Been there...done that! 

Good luck in making your decision for yourself. 

Trusted Contributor

A couple of years ago I remember reading about a full time RV couple from Tennessee who ran into a little trouble with the state.  They were having their mail forwarded from a mail stop location once a month.  Things that needed a mail address: bank statements, DMV notices for license and registrations, insurance, etc.  When they requested a absentee ballot to vote, the Sec. of State declared they were not residents of the state because they had been gone on the road for over a year.  I believe AARP helped them with the situation and cleared it up.  So do a little research to make sure you don't become a couple without a state.

 

Instead of selling the house, we have considered putting the contents in storage and turn the house over to a rental management company to rent it out while we're gone.  Get an RV and go 300 miles at a time and use the RV as a base to explore in a 150 mile radius for a month.  Then mosey down the road another 300 miles.  Travel the northern US in the summer, and southern in the winter.  Should only take 3-5 years.  Add a few cruises once in a while.

 

Good luck to you!!

Gold Conversationalist

Not for me thanks.  Too confining!  (Can’t get away from each other)

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Social Butterfly

It all depends on whether you have a "home base" to operate out of, or not. From the beginning of (human) time, there were nomads/gypsies/migrations. That doesn't always turn out so well (remember Cher's song "Gypsies Tramps And Thieves?). And with the imigration/refugee crissis going on these days, it might not be such a good idea (are you really ready for extreme vetting?). And if you read the article about "imposters" being the scam-of-choice these days, that just compounds the problem. When nobody knows anybody else these days, it might just be best to stay home and watch the grass grow (unless you can go to Mars. I wonder when we'll get a "space-RV"? This reminds me of Donovan's song "Cosmic Wheels").

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My sister and her daughter are living in an RV in Texas full time now because they were displaced by Hurricane Harvey. It definitely has its drawbacks - RVs are not well insulated so they are very cold in winter and very hot in summer. Noise from others in the park is very pronounced as the walls of the RV are quite thin. Her RV is 42 feet long but despite its size it is still quite cramped inside - especially the bedrooms and bathrooms. Renting a space in an RV park is quite expensive (she pays over $500/month all the while paying the mortgage, utilities, taxes, insurance and HOA on the condo she can no longer live in). Additionally, wifi service is very spotty. She must also haul LP tanks in her car to get them refilled quite often. It has its benefits but it's not all it's cracked up to be. 

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Newbie

We sold our home and furnishings and moved into a 5th wheel fifteen months before retirement. A piece of land was purchased and set it up for an RV to be used as our home base. Nearby relatives took care of our mail and yard. All business was taken care of on the internet. For seven years we traveled around the US enjoying the beautiful scenery, met many RVers and made new friends. It was great! After developing a health problem, we now have a home at our home base. Health problem was resolved and although we are no longer Full Timers, we travel and are away from home up to six months at a time. It was wonderful experience and I recommend it. Go for it!

 

Periodic Contributor

  •  My husband and I have been truly on the road, as full-time RV’ers, for over a year and a half. We did sell our house and sold and gave away most of our belongings.  The most important thing about selling your house is that you have to be ready to downsize regardless of what lifestyle you choose.  The other thing we did was to purchase a small travel trailer and pull it with our Jeep. Those who sell their home and use all of their profits to purchase oversized motorhomes don’t leave a nice cushion for retirement years ahead.  We are seeing amazing country side across the United States while not having touched any of our investments in the year and a half.   It is not right for everyone, it is good for us now. Someday, we are likely to be traditional citizens again. Facebook: suebruno
Newbie

The Mrs & I retired young, before 50.  So living frugally has always been our way of life.  We have a been living the RV life part time for over 15 years.  We started out in baby steps.  (Actually had an ultra small vintage 1985 U-haul fiberglass camper). We called it our rolling bed and breakfast.  We stayed at an campground park for 6 weeks.  Traveling on day trips from there. (Montana). We upgraded to a 1984 Fleetwood after 4 years in the the little camper.  Again we managed by staying at one central location then could afford taking vacations far from there.  (We kept our RV in storage in Montana and drive out each year then drive it to our destination)rather than driving it back and forth. Although we currently have a home in the south where we spend the winter and spring. So don’t think that you have to take your rig everywhere.  I recommend that you either buy a used rig or rent, before you commit to an expensive rig.  Downsizing the amount of stuff that you have is an annual thing with us.  The adventure awaits you being “out”, not cooping up in your rig.  Our monthly lot rent at the campground comes with full hookup & WiFi at $675 a month. Our storage space is $45 a month.  We paid cash for our Fleetwood.  So we figure around $4000 is the overall annual cost, plus we take mini excursions and vacations from our vacation, adds about $9000. It’s really affordable for us for 7 months on the road overall and our  base home expenses.  Annually I think we’re under 40,000.  Health insurance is the biggest expense for us, like most retirees. But look honestly at your budget and comfort level and what YOU want to do.  

Contributor

We like to travel, but living in that small of space for a long period of time, I just don't think would work out well. We both dislike hotels, we call them glorified jail cells. What is the best way to travel?

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When I retired we sold our home and bought a 36 foot RV.  We chose to go where our ancestor had gone.  We had to go to 29 of the 50 US states to find their graves and homes because most of our ancestors had come from Europe in the 1600's. We would rairly spend more than a month in one location but when we did move it was often less than 400 miles with the exception for wintering along the Gulf coast.  We spent 18 years on the road.  We were able to learn more about our ancestors than most people do. The day did come six years ago when I told my wife I was tired and we should settle down. "Of all the places we have been," I asked, "where do you want to settle?"  Her reply was, "Where the sun shines all the time."  That is why we returned to Las Cruces, New Mexico. 

Gold Conversationalist

Comment: Don't sell your home! 


@vv6829wrote:

Hello, 

 

We are looking into selling our house and living in a RV Fulltime, travel the country for 1-2 years. Looking to hear from people have done it or are going through it. If there are Recommendations on blogs and books with this topic, that would be great. What are the best States to make it your home state (tax wise), and to register your RV? How easy or difficult is this journey? Any other tax breaks when taking this step? Other things that come in mind is doctors, dentists other specialist.

 

Thanks for the feedback 

 

Vince


 

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We have not done this ourselves just yet, however we know several couples who do travel in their RV's a lot. They all have homes and would not sell as to have a home base for many reasons.  Some of the reasons are stability, mail, having a home of record, storage and I'm sure many others.  We have purchased our first RV an plan to be traveling in it 60 to 70% of the time.  Then of course there are many reasons for selling your home and living in the RV.  So it must boil down to the individual couple or person.  What we plan to do is keep the home and see how it turns out for a couple of years or so.

Best of luck to you

 

Chuck and Deb

Contributor

Hi,

 

There are many books on the subject. If you have a Kindle (Kindle Unlimited) check out the huge selection of books for retirees wanting to make the transition to RV Living Full Time. In reference to the best states they are: Florida, Nevada, New Hampshire, South Dakota, Texas, Washington, Wyoming.

 

You may also check out YouTube and see some video's on the subject.

One of my favorites YouTuber is Mr. Bob Wells (he is also an author - you will find his book at Amazon)

His website is www.cheaprvliving.com

 

Hope this help and good luck!

Cristina Harris

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