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Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,469
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 31 of 40 (6,994 Views)

@retiredtraveler - Because my company had a union, there were written commitments for compensating overtime .. but nothing for management (including ALL levels) in writing. Many times when there was a big project & a lot of overtime, management only had hopes or vague promises they'd "be rewarded" .. sometimes it happened, sometimes they got nothing. Yes .. that was one of the reasons I "retired" as soon as I was financially able. The company that bought our plant was used to dealing with a non-union southern workforce; I wonder if over the past 14 years they've tried to get rid of the unions up north.


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Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,094
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 32 of 40 (6,837 Views)

"....I heard enough insider comments where upper management set goals & deadlines for projects, way below what anyone thought possible .. so you'd feel you'd always be in a no-win situation, managing things....".

 

Getting off topic, but I was in IT as 2nd career. I worked two summers (along with many others), 6 days a week, 10+ hour days, to design and implent 'mission critical' projects. As salaried employees, we got nothing out of it. Managers made $50,000+ bonuses for our bringing in the projects.
   That, in a nutshell, is my opinion of working in America......


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,469
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 33 of 40 (6,488 Views)

@nyadrn - For many of us, the were elements of our jobs we loved, but sometimes an increasing number of factors making work less rewarding. For me, it was having my facility bought out by another company that seemed very personnel-oriented before the change-over, but turned out to be just concerned about the corporation afterwards. Word filtered down quickly that if you were > 45, they probably wouldn't do much as far as "career opportunities" for you .. unless you were willing to move every few years to facilities in other states (kind of impossible for those of us with elderly relatives depending on us). They also planned to combine staff at 2 adjacent facilities, then cut 25%+ of the manpower .. and everyone would be in competition to keep their job. I heard enough insider comments where upper management set goals & deadlines for projects, way below what anyone thought possible .. so you'd feel you'd always be in a no-win situation, managing things.


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Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,094
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 34 of 40 (6,396 Views)

@nyadrn

"....Well that is a sad statement!   I feel really sorry for people who go to work and are miserable every day.   I am sure I am not the only one who enjoys what they do and continues to work....".

 

Yes. What is sad is that I only know a few people, out of so many relatives/inlaws, that enjoy work. "Everyone" seems to be overworked, poor managers, stressed out coworkers, etc.

    I felt that in my 20's. My big financial  'secret' was that I looked at my job situation, which I disliked, and vowed to retire as early as possible and take whatever actions I needed, resulting in retiring early. I did change careers in my 30's, and things got better, but I rarely enjoyed going to work.  


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,094
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 35 of 40 (6,359 Views)

ASTRAEA wrote:

@retiredtraveler - "... but don't you feel that organizations like AARP are promoting people working longer as a necessity for their well-being? I think one reason they're doing it, is to that more people continue paying into the Social Security system, and not start collecting until you're much older.....".

Oh absolutely. I'm only responding to the 'four letter word ' comment.  I am more than aware of how many seniors must continue to work as they are not financially independent. We've had those discussions in the past about how many seniors are retiring impoverished, or soon will be.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Respected Social Butterfly
Posts: 35,570
Registered: ‎02-27-2008

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 36 of 40 (6,143 Views)

retiredtraveler wrote:

In my little part of the world, I've found people to be happy for us to be retired, and envious. I see a belief in the old aphorism that "no one on their death bed says they should have worked longer".

      You (probabably) need mental stimulation as you age to keep your mind sharp, but I only know a handful of people who don't complain about how bad their job is, and how miserable every day is. >>

 

T


Well that is a sad statement!   I feel really sorry for people who go to work and are miserable every day.   I am sure I am not the only one who enjoys what they do and continues to work. 

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
Regular Social Butterfly
Posts: 475
Registered: ‎02-22-2011

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 37 of 40 (5,978 Views)
"If you're already happily retired, or want to retire at or before 65 .. does this change in society's expectations make you feel you're the lazy outlyer .. instead of the successful & fortunate person who can be just as active .. but doing what YOU'D LIKE, rather than toiling at a job?"

Hi Astraea - I am in the second category. Also, have no concern about "society's expectations"... If, in fact - this is what they are. Hmmm.

Haven't been here in awhile - good to see you and RT again. :-)
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,469
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 38 of 40 (5,777 Views)

@retiredtraveler - I totally agree with you, but don't you feel that organizations like AARP are promoting people working longer as a necessity for their well-being? I think one reason they're doing it, is to that more people continue paying into the Social Security system, and not start collecting until you're much older. I'm sure the government would like all of us to work until we die .. lots cheaper for them!


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Trusted Social Butterfly
Posts: 7,094
Registered: ‎02-14-2008

Re: Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

[ Edited ]
Message 39 of 40 (2,229 Views)

In my little part of the world, I've found people to be happy for us to be retired, and envious. I see a belief in the old aphorism that "no one on their death bed says they should have worked longer".

      You (probabably) need mental stimulation as you age to keep your mind sharp, but I only know a handful of people who don't complain about how bad their job is, and how miserable every day is. Companies are making people do more with fewer people. Employees are afraid to complain because management often implies, or directly states, that they can snap their fingers and get someone to replace them. I doubt more than half a dozen people have 'exciting, second careers'. I think that's far more myth than reality.

    I don't need a job for mental and physical stimulation. Volunteer work, travel, and a gym provide plenty of that.


Just think. The world was built by the lowest bidder.
Treasured Social Butterfly
Posts: 19,469
Registered: ‎12-25-2011

Has "Retired" Become a 4-Letter Word?

Message 40 of 40 (1,821 Views)

Traditional retirement age was 65, but back in the 1990s & early 2000s, the goal was to retire younger & have all that much more time to enjoy retirement while physically active. 55+ communities were developed all over, to accommodate something of an "adult camp" lifestyle.

 

But then the housing bubble burst ~ 2007, signaling a serious "belt tightening" for many. More people HAVE to continue working well past 65 to make ends meet. Now AARP (where the "R" used to stand for "RETIRED") & many other organizations have turned their focus on working longer, and having exciting 2nd careers or becoming entrepreneurs. They promote working as a way to stave off Alzheimer's, other forms of mental decline, and physical vegetation.

 

If you're already happily retired, or want to retire at or before 65 .. does this change in society's expectations make you feel you're the lazy outlyer .. instead of the successful & fortunate person who can be just as active .. but doing what YOU'D LIKE, rather than toiling at a job?


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