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Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 1 of 39

This is a good topic and thought to dust it off with a fresh post about it;

So where did you move to or did you stay? 

Did you move to a 55+ community and do you like it?

What advice would you give to someone having to make this choice now?  Have read that Florida and New Jersey have the most 55+ communities do you live in either State?

Thank you all for sharing!  Marie

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 2 of 39

Bunny5580: my husband and I moved to Enid, Oklahoma from central Texas two years ago. We did it because there was no way we would ever be able to pay off our home there and still retire and as I had enormous medical bills it just made sense to sell the place, pay off the bills and move. I have to admit I wasn't thrilled with the idea of moving here at first, but Enid has a small town feel to it even though there are over 50K people living here. The COL is so much better than it was in Texas too. Our home , a small two bedroom bungalow, just over 1000 sq ft, was less than 20K...our 1200 sq ft home in Texas was 95K........the added state income tax is neglible compared to the sales taxes in Texas...........the income for most jobs is on average >65 per hour less but the benefits are enormous. After 11 years in the same jobs and home in Texas we 'knew" 3 couples nearby and were able to count on one couple as friends...here we have found many couples that we can easily count on when we need assistance. It was honestly the best move we ever made.

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 3 of 39

Oklahoma is and always has been high on our list for retirement places. We live in the upper Midwest so your climate would be a huge improvement for us. I have a few small health issues that make the cold we have here unbearable for me and that would be our main factor for moving further south since we don't live in a really high cost area.

 

I wouldn't personally want to live in small town OK, but then again, I'd never again live in a small town up here either. The COL is lower in OK then in most of the country. My husband is on medicare now, but I still need ins. and your premiums are a spit in the ocean compared to most areas, including mine. The cost of apartments, utilities, gas, etc.are well below the national average.

 

We prefer the eastern side of OK and I doubt many people know what a beautiful area it is. We have a friend who has battled cancer twice and has to travel over 600 miles to get there, but goes to Tulsa to the Cancer Institute and raves about it. The people seem friendly and welcoming so we couldn't ask for much more.

Adopt an older pet. Help them remember what it feels like to be loved.
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FLORIDA

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Dear js50558880,

On a recent visit to "The Villages", Florida  I was amazed how many people are

happy and enjoying life.  This place is a mecca for seniors.  It is pristine

and kept to a standard that is superior to any other senior living community

I've visited.  People from NY and the midwest flock there every winter. 

I realize this is an artificial environment, but who cares....it is safe and has

plenty of things for seniors to do.  I can't wait to go again!


js50558880 wrote:

 

My wife and I currently live in Florida but plan to head to Middle America in the next year. We are looking at TN, KY or NC.

 

The strange fact is that I am a native Floridian, born and raised in pre-Disney Orlando. The suburb I grew up in, “Pine Hills”, used to be a great, safe neighborhood. Today most folks know it as “Crime Hills.” This state has gone to “HE Double L” in a hand basket over the last 25 years.

 

I can tell you that Florida is no longer a retirement destination. I say that for a number of reasons.

 

First is cost of housing.

Compared to some places around the US the cost for a place to live is fairly high depending on where you go.  I can buy a home in TN, KY or NC that is twice to three times the square footage as the one I bought here for about 30% less than I paid here.  

 

Other expenses are not that bad but higher than the states we are looking at. The recent recession did make finding a home a bit better because so many people lost their homes.

 

It’s probably a generalization but Florida is sort of like 3 states. South Florida, Central Florida and North Florida. The cost of living is the highest in South Florida and the lowest in North Florida.

 

The second is the culture and infrastructure. First off, let’s face it it’s a beach state and caters to the youth market.  If you are not young you don’t count in Central and South Florida. The population is very transient. If you live in Florida, there's only a little more than a one-in-three chance you were born in this state. In fact, Florida has the second-lowest rate of population made up by native-born residents of that state in the entire nation.

 

You can live in a restricted community like we do but you end up living in an island surrounded by dangerous neighborhoods.

 

Because the population is so young and transient many folks have very liberal ideas about religion, political issues, social issues, family values and lifestyles. I admit, I am an old coot that is set in my ways, but I have a right to disagree with them.  I remember back in the 60’s when I was young I had a lot of dumb ideas too. A stint in the military and working hard to raise a family have markedly changed my world view. There is also a huge drug culture. When I was young they said the drugs would kill me. Of course now at my age they say I’ll die if I don’t take my drugs. Go figure. (Old joke, sorry.)

 

The Associated Press says that Florida is the number-one nuttiest state in America, measured by news output. Mostly that is caused by the under 35 crowd. That’s all the dumb stuff that used to come out of CA, now mostly comes from Florida. I blame it on the heat and humidity. That and dumb people.

 

On top of that, 23 percent of Floridians were born outside the continental United States.  Both South and Central Florida is heavily Hispanic. Spanish is the most common language heard at the shopping center or grocery store anywhere south of Orlando. South is more Hispanic, (mostly Cuban) than Central (A mix, Mexican, South American and Cuban.)  But the according to the U.S. Census the Hispanic community around Orlando is the fastest growing Hispanic community in the world.   There are other ethnic populations. Here in Orlando there is a large Vietnamese community.

 

I don’t speak Spanish and am probably too old to learn another language. I couldn’t do it when I was in school so I doubt I’d be able to do it now. My wife doses speak Spanish and when we come across a store clerk does not speak English or that because of the accent I can’t understand, she translates for me.  

 

Third, Population. Too darn many people. I live in Central Florida, the theme park capital of the world. There are 20 million people living in all of Florida and 80 million visitors, mostly to South and Central Florida each year.  That means over crowded roads, drivers that are often not used to heavy traffic or from other countries in the world that know few of our rules.  Driving on I-4 at rush hour is taking your life in your hands.

 

South and Central Florida has been unable to update the infrastructure to keep up with the increase in population over the past 25 years. Most schools have classes in portable trailers because they can’t build the schools fast enough. The roads and bridges are a disaster. Problems with the power grid (Power lines and Hurricanes don’t mix. You would think they would bury the lines here.), water shortages, sewage issues you name it.

 

North Florida is usually called South Georgia by Floridians. From Gainesville up it’s a very different culture.

 

So, in short it will be cheaper to live outside of Florida in our retirement years.

 

In this post I probably come across as a bigot and racist. I don’t believe I am.  I currently live in a 55 and older community. My neighbors and friends are of every race, creed and color you can think of. The one think that brings us together is the experience of age. It overrides all other titles.


 

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 5 of 39

08-21-2015

 

Hi there, "not sure" about the place you love Cape Cod, MA.

 

It's true I have many relatives who live in Florida, including my elderly mom. It is also true the more crowded the State with the same type of people, mostly retired & elderly, the less quality care you may get from the State of Florida.

 

I recommend that since you have your sisters' in Florida, and you been living so far away for so long from them in Cape Cod, why don't you move to Virginia, Georgia, North or South Carolina? The quality of care may be the same, but there are less people living in those states.

 

Hope my advice helps you.

 

 

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 6 of 39

I live in western Massachusetts in a small town, I find the cost of living is fairly low. You might consider relocating a bit to the west .The cost of living here is much lower than Cape Cod, though probably slightly higher than the Midwest or South. I have enjoyed my 24 years in Massachusetts, but I miss the wide open spaces of the West and I have  decided to relocate to Wyoming or Idaho, where  I expect the cost of living for a low income persom will be slightly higher. I will miss living in a state where the average IQ seems to be 15 points higher than the rest of the country, living here was almost like living in a more advanced European country. I will also miss the beautiful New England Fall, I tell friends to try not to die until you have seen Autumn in New England.

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FLORIDA

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Message 7 of 39

The State of Florida welcomes retirees.  It is a haven for those seeking a senior friendly lifestyle.  I am not happy about having to relocate but reality is that I can no longer afford to live in California.

 

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 8 of 39

No, we did not. We also live in the SF Bay Area but financial planning helped us recover from a personal bankruptcy in our early 40's and enabled us to take early retirement despite the Great Recession of 2008-9. We have a very comfortable lifestyle and have LTCi policies to cover old age infirmities (which feel like they're already starting, LOL!).

 

But we do have friends and family who are very worried about being able to keep living here. With Prop 13 came the good/bad: education suffered a loss of financing but seniors are able to keep a home as their property taxes rise only at a defined, moderate limit. It is hard on renters, though, of any age: very little rental housing is built here (land is very, very expensive) so costs often jump dramatically.

 

One couple we know moved to Panama. It took them 2 yrs to do a permanent move and once there they moved four or five times, trying different areas/elevations. They are currently happily settled in a gated community in Boquete. But if the husband could afford it, he'd move back to the US in a heartbeat. His wife was born in South America so not a problem for her.

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 9 of 39

My thoughts as well. I lived in MI, UT, and now NC. We need affordable housing for middle come 55+. We need AARP to go to Washington, DC or states to help the middle come seniors stay afloat and make affordable apt. living for us all. We do not quilfy for low income or make enough for "A Place for Mom".

 

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YES: Did You Have To Leave An Area

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Message 10 of 39


Dear rm92968539, 

I agree.....Florida here we come!  May I ask where you plan to live in Florida?

COTTAGE.jpg


rm92968539 wrote:
I have lived in CT for over 20 years and I love my neighborhood, church, friends, relatives, etc. the taxes and cost of living here is just unacceptable and not affordable. This is a Democrat controlled State so the economy is terrible and taxes too high. We are moving to Florida where the costs are much more reasonable. Follow the Republicans if you want a State with a strong economy, low taxes, better health care and overall quality of life.

 

 

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