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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 21 of 41
No.
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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 22 of 41
Hi everyone! I fit in this box so I thought I would throw my situation in the hat. I retired last year due to mostly health issues (two knee surgeries and stress). I currently live in Sacramento, CA and going through foreclosure. Cost of living is insane. Rent is higher than an average mortgage. But worst of all is the WATER shortage! Water is metered and is costing me $250 a month for garbage, sewer, and water. Califoria will be known as the brown lawn state. They are really outlawing water use to the max. Crime is up and it's crowded with rude people and horrible traffic.
So, I just decided today to leave Sacramento and move to Oregon. Got accepted for a real nice two bedroom duplex for $700 a month, water and garbage included. I can water my lawn, have a garden and wash my car in my driveway! The people in Bend, Oregon are peaceful and friendly and the location is perfect for outdoor fun at the various lakes and rivers. I am excited to retire in small town USA!
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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 23 of 41

After reading everyone's comments, personally I would prefer a blue state since I've been a New Yorker my entire life & considering I'm 20 min. from Hillary Clinton's house (met them 1x when they were looking to move here from the White House).  Anyway, the core issue for us must be financial.  Ideally, it would be great if we could live in our home state or a similar one with a low cost of living, low taxes & great medical care.  Unfortunately, not all 50 states have this, so we must weigh retirement survival vs. idealism.  This is an individual decision but reality does set in at retirement and you're faced with enjoying your freedom with the money in your bank account.  Once the money is gone, you can't return to work & collect another paycheck.

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 24 of 41
Thanks. I would consider OK City and Tulsa. Not fond of rural towns.
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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 25 of 41
yes the mountains of Arizon were much less expensive than courpus chridti TX
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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 26 of 41

Goldye, I don't know how you would classify Oklahoma.  We live in a suburb considered affluent but we have a range of incomes.  We have what we call the Oklahoma Standard--we relish in helping others.  My neighbor of 20 years is NY born and bred and she totally loves OK.  Because of our low cost of living, Northern/Northeastern companies often relocate here.  Some of these transplants tell us they came here "kicking and screaming," but they could not imagine their good fortune.  Some tell us they could buy a "mansion" here compared to their 2 or 3br frame home in the Northeast for similar or even cheaper money.  They delight in knowing their neighbors and being able to "borrow that cup of sugar" or "conference on the driveways."

 

You mention medical care.  OKC and Tulsa are superior.  OKC in the last decade or so has become known nationally for its medical research.  We have always found exceptional physicians, hospitals, therapists, etc.  

 

Granted, you would find perhaps a different culture, medical component, etc. in the tiny rural towns that dot our state, but do give the large metropolitan areas a consideration.

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 27 of 41
I live in NY. I cannot remain here now that I am not working. Taxes are so high. My biggest problem as others also have is real estate has not rebounded and properties like mine are not selling so I can move.
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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 28 of 41

We are beginning to contemplate this. We live in the San Francisco Bay Area. The climate is hard to beat, but the cost of housing is getting higher and higher. We've looked at other areas in Northern California, but it's so darn HOT in the summer in some of the areas around Sacramento, for instance. Like some of the other posters, we wish to stay in a blue state. Oregon is a possibility, but we do wonder about the many fewer sunny days per year. Has anyone moved to Oregon from California? Any observations? Thanks! 

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 29 of 41

My wife and I currently live in Florida but plan to head to Middle America in the next year. We are looking at TN, KY or NC.

 

The strange fact is that I am a native Floridian, born and raised in pre-Disney Orlando. The suburb I grew up in, “Pine Hills”, used to be a great, safe neighborhood. Today most folks know it as “Crime Hills.” This state has gone to “HE Double L” in a hand basket over the last 25 years.

 

I can tell you that Florida is no longer a retirement destination. I say that for a number of reasons.

 

First is cost of housing.

Compared to some places around the US the cost for a place to live is fairly high depending on where you go.  I can buy a home in TN, KY or NC that is twice to three times the square footage as the one I bought here for about 30% less than I paid here.  

 

Other expenses are not that bad but higher than the states we are looking at. The recent recession did make finding a home a bit better because so many people lost their homes.

 

It’s probably a generalization but Florida is sort of like 3 states. South Florida, Central Florida and North Florida. The cost of living is the highest in South Florida and the lowest in North Florida.

 

The second is the culture and infrastructure. First off, let’s face it it’s a beach state and caters to the youth market.  If you are not young you don’t count in Central and South Florida. The population is very transient. If you live in Florida, there's only a little more than a one-in-three chance you were born in this state. In fact, Florida has the second-lowest rate of population made up by native-born residents of that state in the entire nation.

 

You can live in a restricted community like we do but you end up living in an island surrounded by dangerous neighborhoods.

 

Because the population is so young and transient many folks have very liberal ideas about religion, political issues, social issues, family values and lifestyles. I admit, I am an old coot that is set in my ways, but I have a right to disagree with them.  I remember back in the 60’s when I was young I had a lot of dumb ideas too. A stint in the military and working hard to raise a family have markedly changed my world view. There is also a huge drug culture. When I was young they said the drugs would kill me. Of course now at my age they say I’ll die if I don’t take my drugs. Go figure. (Old joke, sorry.)

 

The Associated Press says that Florida is the number-one nuttiest state in America, measured by news output. Mostly that is caused by the under 35 crowd. That’s all the dumb stuff that used to come out of CA, now mostly comes from Florida. I blame it on the heat and humidity. That and dumb people.

 

On top of that, 23 percent of Floridians were born outside the continental United States.  Both South and Central Florida is heavily Hispanic. Spanish is the most common language heard at the shopping center or grocery store anywhere south of Orlando. South is more Hispanic, (mostly Cuban) than Central (A mix, Mexican, South American and Cuban.)  But the according to the U.S. Census the Hispanic community around Orlando is the fastest growing Hispanic community in the world.   There are other ethnic populations. Here in Orlando there is a large Vietnamese community.

 

I don’t speak Spanish and am probably too old to learn another language. I couldn’t do it when I was in school so I doubt I’d be able to do it now. My wife doses speak Spanish and when we come across a store clerk does not speak English or that because of the accent I can’t understand, she translates for me.  

 

Third, Population. Too darn many people. I live in Central Florida, the theme park capital of the world. There are 20 million people living in all of Florida and 80 million visitors, mostly to South and Central Florida each year.  That means over crowded roads, drivers that are often not used to heavy traffic or from other countries in the world that know few of our rules.  Driving on I-4 at rush hour is taking your life in your hands.

 

South and Central Florida has been unable to update the infrastructure to keep up with the increase in population over the past 25 years. Most schools have classes in portable trailers because they can’t build the schools fast enough. The roads and bridges are a disaster. Problems with the power grid (Power lines and Hurricanes don’t mix. You would think they would bury the lines here.), water shortages, sewage issues you name it.

 

North Florida is usually called South Georgia by Floridians. From Gainesville up it’s a very different culture.

 

So, in short it will be cheaper to live outside of Florida in our retirement years.

 

In this post I probably come across as a bigot and racist. I don’t believe I am.  I currently live in a 55 and older community. My neighbors and friends are of every race, creed and color you can think of. The one think that brings us together is the experience of age. It overrides all other titles.

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Re: Did You Have To Leave An Area You Loved Because You Simply Couldn't Afford To Retire There?

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Message 30 of 41

My dilema is that I moved into a senior mobile home park 9 years ago.  My space rent was quite affordable and I planned to retire within 5 years.  The rent had not been raised but once in 12 years prior. Every year since then the rent goes up so I have had to continue working.  I put my place on the market two years ago so I could help take care of my aging mother. I have had nearly twenty people with cash want to purchase my home but when they go to fill out the paperwork, they are told they don't qualify. When I retire I won't qualify to live there either as your income has to be three times what the space rent is.  This is an unfair ruling the management has imposed on residents unless you are on "HUD". I can't sell and can't retire... I am currently composing a letter to my congressman and assemlyman about this rule that is basically pricing people out of their mobile homes with no avenue for escape. JAH Santa Ana, CA

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