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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 111 of 160
"Don't be kissin' by the garden gate, 'cause love is blind but the neighbors ain't!"
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 112 of 160
Grandma used to tell me: "Pretty is as Pretty does."
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 113 of 160
That'd be 'pining'. The root is 'pine'. To maintain the sound of /i/ as in mine, do not double the 'n'. If you double the 'n', you shorten the 'i' so it would be like in 'bin', 'din', or 'fin'.
Unless you meant getting 'pinned' as when a woman would receive a promise of engagement from a man when he gave her his fraternity pin. Then he would be 'pinning' her, I guess.
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 114 of 160
My Grandmother used to say "oh, pashaw" when wanting to express a term of frustration or disgust.
And then for directions there was "kanty-wampus".
Some brand names were interchangeable with their descriptive noun, I.e. Frigidaire, Xerox, Saran Wrap, etc.
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 115 of 160
Yes, these are the words that should come back into play. The next generation should get a grip on them to make life bearable.
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 116 of 160

@ASTRAEA wrote:
@InsertCleverNameHere wrote:

Davenport (meaning "sofa" or "couch").


This is actually a good opportunity to learn about the etymology of words!

"Davenport" was the name of Massachusetts furniture manufacturing company (no longer exists), and their furniture became so popular, it became the generic name for sofas at the time!

 

That's similar to "aspirin", which was synthesized by Bayer in Germany, in the late 19th Century, and also became the common generic description for  acetylsalicylic acid.


Thank you.  I was curious about the orgin of "Davenport" and I found the same article by using google!

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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 117 of 160
@InsertCleverNameHere wrote:

Davenport (meaning "sofa" or "couch").


This is actually a good opportunity to learn about the etymology of words!

"Davenport" was the name of Massachusetts furniture manufacturing company (no longer exists), and their furniture became so popular, it became the generic name for sofas at the time!

 

That's similar to "aspirin", which was synthesized by Bayer in Germany, in the late 19th Century, and also became the common generic description for  acetylsalicylic acid.


Registered on Online Community since 2007!
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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 118 of 160

Davenport (meaning "sofa" or "couch").

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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 119 of 160

You may want to add galoshes or four buckle artics to that winter attire.  Here in Michigan's Upper Peninsula we also call a stocking cap a chuk, rhymes with duke, but ski hat is probably more commonly used and heavy duty mittens are known as choppers.

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Re: Words that are no longer used today...

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Message 120 of 160

Along that same line is one of my favorites:  dingbat

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