Prepare to Care: A Resource Guide for Families was developed by AARP to help make the job more manageable. Here’s how to obtain a free copy.

Reply
Treasured Social Butterfly
2
Kudos
1922
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,922 Views
Message 11 of 67

@Epster

 

Silly little rules and reg's , live in the same climate.

 

Shooting in air to warn off, well it's within city/village limits not allowed.

 

Was going to suggest well ripened urine but, knew that wouldn't fly, in roll call.

 

Call wildlife and have them set a barrel trap, with their finest well-ripened grease and doughnuts.

 

If bear makes regular house calls. Have had to use a few to move some bears on.

 

Game wardens just love to hear from me😇, when you have bear scat in the driveway and are a good steward of the land, with no garbage or BBQ outside, you've done your bit.

 

Chickens are a buffet waiting to happen, call wildlife, wardens service or fish and game and request a trap, to relocate your visitor.

 

Froze

Report Inappropriate Content
2
Kudos
1922
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1921
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze / Backyard bear management

1,921 Views
Message 12 of 67
@Frozenoem wrote:

Comfy 66* with no humidity due until Friday.

 

Cute bear, consider dogs or gun to warn teddy off. Most of the foaming bear spray is good for 20-30 foot spray if well shaken.

 

I mention dogs as mine in years past have treed several, and given teddy pause. Helped my neighbors with bears on the deck, emptying feeders.

 

Side note bears dislike the smell of dog spotting territory.

Where the scent is There may be dogs unfriendly to bears 🐻.

 

Froze


@Frozenoem  I moved this over here so nobody gets their panties in a knot over a second round of off-topic chatter. Smiley Happy

 

We have guns. Indeed, I'd venture to say that 70% of the houses within a 2 mile radius own firearms. Rural living. Thing is we cannot shoot the bear. For one thing, we cannot get a clean shot off due to houses and the rocky cliff. For another, it is illegal. I did call the wildlife peeps who referred me to law enforcement (wha-?) who told me call again when the bear is in front of me. Heck, when the bear is visible I'm calling all the neighbors, giving them a chance to get FiFi and stock out of harm's way, but, yeah, OK then. Smiley Happy

 

As to canines, three of five households on this hill own dogs. We haven't had dogs for over a decade because mountain lions are far more frequent visitors here than are bear, and my dog of choice is an Italian Greyhound. (read: puma snack on legs) In addition, no one on this hogback has chosen to mar the old west landscape with a fence (other than a goat pen here, a chicken yard there). An unfenced sighthound is a goner.

 

But ya know, we like living here with the wildlife, however we do have to live here with care and awareness.

 

All that to explain this: we use human urine to set the boundaries for wildlife. So far so good. Smiley Happy

 

One issue, though: this appears to be a bear that has lost/ is losing fear of humans, which is why I bothered to call the wildlife control people, to give them a heads up about that possibility.

 

PS Once we are retired and ready to hit the road, we'll get a pair of Italian Greyhounds. I really cannot wait. We have been dogless far too long!

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
1
Kudos
1921
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1929
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,929 Views
Message 13 of 67

@Frozenoem No worries. Thanks for the correction. Off to hunt a few Nazis ... uh, wait ... not that. 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
1929
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1926
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,926 Views
Message 14 of 67

@Epster

 

Wilhelm was a good guy, not Nazi. Edited my original post know I missed a period.

 

Also like a good Mainer embellished the story.😇

 

For the the life of me I read the story of Nazi in a book and saw the clipping of return to Germany before the war.

 

But, drawing a blank on his name. Can see the photo in my minds eye but, caption isn't happening.

 

Meals we're approx 6 times per day, with leftovers. Men had to work for war effort, extra rations.

 

Camp to road which didn't exist in 40's was approx 1 1/2 hour walk. The main road to NH or Me was 2 hours to Rangeley or 2 hours to NH.

 

Or boat if lucky and caught the tug 2 1/2 hours away. More if paddling - in Rangeley boat or Canoe.

 

Froze

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
1926
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1911
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,911 Views
Message 15 of 67

@Frozenoem wrote:

@Epster

 

Shift in the woods? 12-16 hour days, depending upon weather, sunlight, etc.

 

Mules or horses depending, in time of rations only the cook might get car and gas, to get to town either Rangeley or NH.

 

According to neighbors - you felt it coming, right. Chief complaint from cook was pay scale 50% drop, and the geezly GD blackflies😇.

 

Don't know how much he might be able to pack into the stagecoach to my neck of the woods, that also ran to RR for sports. Once per day😇

 

 

Google always works for history. Too many stories of coastal or mountain living Nazi's.

 

Just read carefully Wilhelm Reich good, drawing a blank on Nazi's name he was sent home to Germany before the War had begun.

 

Froze

 


@Frozenoem Yep: the first trucks --the ones that always woke me up at 4AM-- showed up in groups of three hours before dawn and the last trucks came down the hill after dark. At least 12 hour days. Back home, many of the crew took trailers with them from camp to camp, because not only were work days too long to afford going home at night, the locations were typically 50 miles into the forest. I was just wondering about that 6 meals versus 4 meals thing and thought perhaps in Maine, given that spring/summer days are 15 and a half hours long, that they worked shifts. Smiley Happy I guess not. Smiley Happy Nevermind. Smiley Happy

 

Right: those black flies must have been horrid before Deet. And of course logging roads themselves tend to be a challenging traverse. Forget what they called it, but one LOC pic showed a horse drawn wheel-less 'wagon' that had transported lunch. Hope it wasn't soup. Smiley Happy Bumpety bump bump bump.

 

Will check out Wilhelm Reich.  Thanks!

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
1
Kudos
1911
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1912
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,912 Views
Message 16 of 67

@Epster

 

Shift in the woods? 12-16 hour days, depending upon weather, sunlight, etc.

 

Mules or horses depending, in time of rations only the cook might get car and gas, to get to town either Rangeley or NH.

 

According to neighbors - you felt it coming, right. Chief complaint from cook was pay scale 50% drop, and the geezly GD blackflies😇.

 

Don't know how much he might be able to pack into the stagecoach to my neck of the woods, that also ran to RR for sports. Once per day😇

 

 

Google always works for history. Too many stories of coastal or mountain living Nazi's.

 

Just read carefully Wilhelm Reich good.drawing a blank on Nazi's name he was sent home to Germany before the War had begun with US.

 

Remember reading the news clipping, and about him in one of a million books on Rangeley Lakes, and the news clipping came from friend recently passed at 99. Who used to be guide at a camp next to mine.

 

That Camp was owned by the DuPonts, wealthy and eccentric. With 10 outbuildings and an indoor squash/badminton/basketballcourtin log cabin, and tennis court, even in the 1930's.

 

Think they owned a bank still do.😎

 

Froze

 

Report Inappropriate Content
1
Kudos
1912
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1869
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,869 Views
Message 17 of 67

@Frozenoem Appreciate you sharing the history: fun to read it especially after pouring over the Library of Congress photos from your link.

 

Do you know if they worked in shifts? One photo caption (which could obviously be incorrect) said the cook provided 4 meals during the log drives. Your days right now are about a half hour longer than are ours, which is why I ask.

 

Poor Cookie. Such a dramatic change, from the Ritz to a logging camp. I wonder if he lamented serving his food out of huge pots set on the ground.

 

About eating more than Hobbits: one guy I knew was a faller. He could pack away about a third of the contents of the fridge a day. (His wife had a very busy kitchen, I can tell you that!) Of couse he burned it all off daily, too. His dad was a loader operator. Between the two of them they had the keys to every locked gate in the forest. Smiley Happy

 

Nazi's in Rangeley? Pray tell. (I guess I can Google it)

 

@JoyaDe I once lived in a place set so close to the road that the log trucks zipping past at 4:10 woke me each morning. I could often hear the tower from home. My DNA family didn't work in timber, however pritnear every one of my extended family members did, as did I. One branch owned a timber company. This wasn't in Colorado, though, and my association with timber is nearly 30 years past. 

 

And how interesting that today, coming back from town we saw a log truck in traffic? I figure we see a log truck here about once every 2 years. 

 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
1
Kudos
1869
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1818
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,818 Views
Message 18 of 67

@JoyaDe

 

I do know the feeling that's how some of my grands and great grands got their start in this new land.

 

Including one who worked on a Lombard steam engine/skidder in his early years around 1900.

 

Froze

Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
1
Kudos
1818
Views
Frequent Social Butterfly
1
Kudos
1821
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,821 Views
Message 19 of 67

@Frozenoem  I enjoy hearing about life in the logging camps.  My sister has been working on the history of our family and that was what some of our early settlers here did.  

Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
1
Kudos
1821
Views
Treasured Social Butterfly
2
Kudos
1821
Views

Re: Shoot the Breeze

1,821 Views
Message 20 of 67

Service for 20-30 men, 6 times per day. They ate more than Hobbits but, did loads more work.

 

My camp had the company books from 1940's and spoke to one kid camper, and a Maine guide also helped at Brown for the Chef/cook.

 

The cook had a slight drinking issue when working at Ritz in Boston, reduced to cook at a logging company, through WW2.

 

So, it was just cook and 2 assistants, later reduced to one assistant as, one went off to war.

 

But, they did have the other delights of working Upcountry including a dance hall, if they bathed or jumped in the lake.

 

Used to be lodgings for sports (fishermen) and their families, even during the war years.

 

Complete with a sentry, weekends or Sundays only for dancing. Sentry/guard post as there was a Dam and it had to be protected. Also there had been Nazi's in Rangeley, Maine less than 6-12 hour march/hike, ride horse 2 hours, car with gas ration still 1/2 to 1 hour. Always on the lookout for moose, bear, deer.

 

Froze

Report Inappropriate Content
Tags (1)
2
Kudos
1821
Views