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Re: Shifting Retirement Priorities: what's worth your time

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@retiredtraveler  I hear that!

 

My response to having worked morning, noon and night since I was a teen --usually wearing more than one professional hat at a time-- is that my retirement is going to be an extended vacation. Think all those trips we never took. Think getting to bike whenever we want without need to get back and tend animals or gardens. Think getting to go wherever the weather is nice and the trails are long without need to worry about the hacienda. We won't have one to worry about! Ah: bliss. Smiley Happy At least the first part. Once feebleness sets in, then it'll be a condo or apt in an active living community.

 

Of course to do this I will need to learn how to relax ... LOL. 

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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In order to retire early and well, I spent a huge amount of 'free time', since my 20's, studying investing and macroeconomics. Essentially, I treated that as a part-time job. 

   After retiring, and spending the greater part of first two years traveling in a popup and staying in NP's, hiking, for weeks at a time, worked on the house. I had put off all kinds of house projects until retirement.  That was a large, two year effort.

  Next came the gardening and landscaping projects which I spend time on every day now. I also have small orchard, berries, veggie garden, perennials, roses, etc. I cut, split, stack firewood. That's where most of the effort is, aside from working out 5 days a week.

   I don't really have anything that is not worth the time any longer. I do far less investing. Bottom line is that DW and I put a lot of time into work --- lots of going in early, staying late, long commute,and that's gone. Plus, our 20's into early 30's was spent going to night school, studying, doing homework, to change careers. Never had a lot of 'free time'.       


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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As much as I've enjoyed having lots of fruit trees --and the fruit that goes with them-- I rather look forward to not owning any fruit trees in retirement.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Shifting Retirement Priorities: what's worth your time

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There it was again. Someone had just told me that I work too hard. I’ve been told this throughout my life, but you know what? I don’t agree. Whenever someone tells me that I think of the pioneers, walking across the plains. I think of settlers toiling to turn hard pan into utopia, and I think no way I work too hard.

 

I do put a lot of effort into practically everything I take on. I have always believed that nothing worthwhile comes easy, that we must work to achieve our goals. Still, once DH and I hit the road in an RV I won’t be growing a garden. I won’t be raising our own meat and I might not even be making our own herbal remedies. My goals will shift and some of what I spend time on now will not be worth my time then.

 

Today’s goals? Harvest the wild spinach growing in my hugelkultur bed, mix it with the New Zealand spinach growing in my greenhouse, add some homegrown chard and kale, steam the whole caboodle, chop and freeze the results in meal-sized parcels. And do so before thunderstorms kick up.

 

I began today’s apparent example of ‘too much’ by filling one of these twice. Once with wild spinach, once with the greenhouse items. The result was enough prepared organic greens in my freezer for 30 omelets. In all honesty, I don’t think that’s too much to ask for a little bit of kitchen prep work.

 

What about you? What are you willing to put a lot of effort into? Your investments? Your health? Your grandkids? Conversely, what did you see as not worth your time anymore once you retired?

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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