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Treasured Social Butterfly
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Re: Planning to Age in Place? Find a Contractor Now

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I find that a lot of these articles don't address a couple of the most important issues, the first being "location". If your home isn't in a convenient location for someone getting older, all the expensive redesigning is like the proverbial "putting lipstick on a pig".

 

The second issue is not tackling the "memories" vs "practicality". While no one would suggest it's OK to hoard "because all of these things have memories attached", they're giving a pass to seniors who want to remain in a house in which they raised children, and is not only way too big, but isn't laid out efficiently for someone aging. Why pay 2/3 more in property taxes & utilities, and deal with 2-story living, when a person should be encouraged to take their mementos to a right-sized home on a single level?!


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Interesting article.. we have discussed this subject in several different topics.  Making a decision as soon as possible makes it easier to review finances and get work done before it is an emergency (like a broken bone or knee replacement) dictates change.

 

If you love your home and want to stay there is an option!!

 

 

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Planning to Age in Place? Find a Contractor Now

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CreditJoyce Hesselberth 

 

>>

Older people have the highest rate of homeownership in the country — about 80 percent, according to a 2016 report by the Joint Center for Housing Studies at Harvard. The great majority live in single-family homes, most of them poorly suited for the disabilities common in later life.

The center has looked at three of the most important accessibility features that allow people to move safely around their living spaces: entrances without steps, single-floor living, and wide hallways and doorways that can accommodate wheelchairs.

“Less than 4 percent of the U.S. housing stock has all three of those,” said Jennifer Molinsky, a senior research associate at the center.

Add two more important elements for aging in place — doors with lever handles, and light switches and electrical outlets that can be reached from a wheelchair — and the proportion drops to 1 percent.

You’ll often hear older people vow that they won’t leave their homes except “feet first.” Without modifications, however, the design of most older Americans’ homes could eventually thwart their owners’ desire to stay in them.

Solving that problem, individually or collectively, means confronting certain obstacles.>>

 

https://www.nytimes.com/2017/05/19/health/aging-in-place-contractors.html?smid=fb-nytimes&smtyp=cur&...

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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