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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@Prosecco6247 - Good topic and thread! Thanks for posting. It never hurts to have a reminder or review best practices.

 

I don't use social media either. I once set up a Facebook account, and used the strictest privacy settings available. I had not posted anything or "friended" anyone, when several fake emails started coming in to the address on the account, so I canceled it immediately. I'm glad that I did, because it seems much worse now with people having their accounts hacked, etc. Anonymous is good! 

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Thanks! I appreciate that! N.
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@catwoman500said "I think I got a little off-topic here and I apologize. Cat Happy"

 

Not at all!  This is all about protecting oneself on the internet and the content of whatever you share regarding transactions on the internet is certainly of interest and on topic!

 

You may be inexperienced when it comes to using social media but you have a wealth of  experience communicating while using the internet as an eBay seller.  

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@Prosecco6247, EXCELLENT points! 

I never really thought that much about the feedback since I've never received negative feedback. The buyers certainly do have your address! As a seller I know how important feedback is and when I give it myself, whether it is an item or a service, I always leave the positive and just don't give negative feedback. I always ask my buyers to contact me before they leave feedback if they are not pleased with their purchase.

This is my note that I write after thanking them for their payment:

 

*A friendly note: Sellers depend on and are rated by positive feedback. Please leave positive feedback for me and I will do the same for you. Thanks! If you have a problem with your item, please contact me before leaving feedback and I will do everything I can to make it right for you.

 

I think I got a little off-topic here and I apologize. Cat Happy

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@catwoman500  I absolutely agree with you!  I do not engage on social media like Facebook and Twitter.  I tried it once and it seemed fun at first, but I was vaguely uncomfortable with the exposure...as you pointed out!

 

I wouldn't rent a highway billboard to announce every little detail of my private life, share pictures of loved ones or grandchildren, my vacations, my new car or jewelry, my resume or CV.  I cannot understand why anyone would.  When displaying it online, it reaches a far wider audience than the lighted billboard on the intersection of High & Main Streets!

 

Do you want that information available at the fingertips of the suspected "perv" in the next block...the one you think of when warning your children & grandchildren about "stranger danger?"   Do you warn them not to strike up a conversation with a friendly adult at the school bus stop or tell them not to help someone who says he's lost his puppy and needs their assistance?  You don't want to frighten them but you know how important it is to prevent them from that same "exposure."

 

Internet opportunists, scammers and those with criminal intent &/or perversions are a far greater danger to you and your family...in greater numbers and an astounding variety of schemes.  Their imaginations coupled with public records already available on the internet increase one's risk exponentially.  Simply put...it's just not safe to make the rest of one's life a matter of public record (with images!) as well.

 

Your comment on eBay's feedback is well-taken by the cautious internet user.  Disgruntled buyers can make horrible comments, name your location based on the origination of the shipment and generally create havoc with your good name and reputation as an honest seller.  I also shy away from "ratings" sites...restaurant views, doctors, dentists, lawyers, tradespeople and so forth.  Angry patrons and clients put ugly things in writing when they've experienced an outcome they didn't like...even though it was probably no fault of the person they were dealing with.  Many of us have experienced life "on the other side" as a provider of goods or services and know the reality of the business side.  Perhaps they didn't like your personality or your bedside/chairside/courtroom manner and wanted an outcome that was never going to be possible.  Their comments can be fierce and hateful.  I take all of that with a grain of salt if I look it up at all.  Generally, I pay more attention to the positive reviews because they tell me that good service is possible.  Bad reviews are usually based on a hidden agenda...a payback for perceived poor service/bad outcome.

 

It's an eye-opener all right and there is a cruel element out there waiting for an opportunity to create mischief...or worse!  Don't help them by announcing all of your personal business!

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Category:Facebook-Privacy-and-Safety

 

http://www.wikihow.com/Avoid-Scams-on-Craigslist

http://www.wikihow.com/Be-a-Responsible-Twitter-User

 

 

 

 

 

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@Prosecco6247, Thanks again, Mimi, I don't even do any social media at all. never have, never will. I just think it's way too much exposure. It's bad enough that anyone can Google an Ebay ID and read the feedback people have posted. Not that I care, but it was an eye opener. Cat Surprised

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@catwoman500  You know, it's an interesting thing.  The very people who ask are usually the ones who instinctively know how much is "too much!"  Woman Very Happy

 

Lots of people intertwine little bits and pieces of "local color" or even a few personal bits that are of little consequence into a story for the sake of making it interesting.  Those are the kinds of innocent details that one could find in any family at any given time over the course of a lifetime and do not put someone at risk.

 

The information I am talking about about is much more specific to the individual poster and can be strung together to create a pretty complete profile by an experienced con man/woman.  It can be such things as exact locations, schedules, names & ages of children/grandchildren, announcing plans to be away from home on a weekend...I don't want to be any more specific than that on an open forum.

 

You are doing just fine!  Heart

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@Prosecco6247, I am so behind on catching up with all these posts. This is a great one...THANKS, and let me know if you think I'm sharing too much! Cat Tongue

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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@retiredtraveler and @Soosie Not to worry!  I think a certain amount of judicious sharing is necessary to good communications on a message board.  The main point is to make friends, learn from each other and have fun!  Heart

 

JMO, but I think the problem comes into play with "oversharing" certain types of identifiable information that scammers can assemble to make a credible portfolio of information in order to perpetrate their mischief and cause you untold grief.  Woman Sad

 

They tend to use what they already know from someone's own statements and combine it with publicly available information.  A good "confidence man" (or woman) can then pass him/herself off as the "mark"...oftentimes very successfully.  Remember, you can be anyone you want to be on the internet!  Woman Wink

 

The tips below are from the previously cited "CyberScout" source.  It is not possible to separate the bullet points listed in the original into individual links. These are from "Enjoying A Safer Cyberlife" but the content is longer than I would normally "cut & paste."  If a curiosity exists, click on the link in the original post and look for this title.

 

1. Maintain anonymity. Try to remain as anonymous as possible online.

2. Trust your gut. If it feels weird, it’s weird.

3. Ask yourself: Does this pass the “mom” test? If you wouldn’t want your mother to see it, don’t post it online.

4. Beware of cyberbullying. A: Don’t do it. B: If you’re being bullied, report it immediately.

5. Be aware of techniques for redirecting website users to “cloned” replica sites without their knowledge, also known as “pharming.” Watch for odd error messages, unexpected page layout or content or other strange site behavior.

6. Create a new username and password for different sites.

7. Leave it! If you suspect a website is not what it claims, leave it immediately. Do not click or run any content or software.

8. Do not connect to “free Wi-Fi” access points. It might be the “evil twin” of a legitimate access point, set up to intercept your logins and online transactions.

9. Do not use cracked/pirated software. These are great avenues for introducing malware into or exploiting weaknesses in a system. This also applies to P2P (peer-to-peer) illegally distributed audio and video files.

 

 

Babbling on about vacation plans, travel for work or professional obligations, new purchases or acquisitons, the exact neighborhood you live in, issues with local merchants and local boards/organizations you belong to can reveal more about your personal business than you'd imagine. Remember, the scammers are pros but this type of local information allows them to "pick the low-hanging fruit."  

 

Putting phone numbers in script form on a message board or dating site is a no-no as well.

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Re: How Much Is Too Much To Share Online?

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I'm probably guilty of sharing too much. I guess the 'saving grace' here is that this is the only forum I'm posting to, aside from TripAdvisor, using a very different online name. I don't have any other online presence aside from conducting business transactions. I look at a number of different sites, but don't post to them.   


"...Why is everyone a victim? Take personal responsibility for your life..."
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