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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 11 of 71
You people are about to kil me with joy. How wonderful to know such people even though this media. Who thought of this? It is just wonderful. Wish I knew these people personally but it is enough to know you exist.
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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 12 of 71

Thank you for opening the door for me to write about a life lesson that was, though not at the time, a fond memory. I remember my mother insisting that each time our father bought us shoes, etc. we had to thank him. I could not understand why a father had to be thanked for doing what I felt he was susposed to do. My words of thanks was anything but sincere. When I asked my mother why we had to thank our father for doing what fathers do, she told me that one day I would learn that not all fathers provide for their children and because I was so blessed, I should show gratitude. I did not believe this at all. I knew no father who did not provide for their children. Mother also used this teaching as a Bible lesson about our relationship with God, our Heavenly Father and how (to her) one of the worst sins in the world was that of ingratitude. I (fondly) remember as a student in elementary school being asked by our teacher, "Who knows the meaning of the word 'ingrate?'"  Of course I raised my hand and remember being the only child in the class who knew the meaning of the word, ingrate.

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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 13 of 71
I agree. These are great post!
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Bronze Conversationalist

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

611 Views
Message 14 of 71
Very insightful and healthy.One thing is sure, he produced a good child, evidence that he certainly had goodness within.
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Conversationalist

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 15 of 71

Mine are full of family - my mom, dad and siblings.  We went to Mazatland one year (about 50 years ago) and it was beautiful!  My dad (who we later found out was bipolar, an alcholoic, and a gambler) shared so much with us during that two weeks.  It was just family so he didn't have to put on any airs for anyone.  We fished, we shopped, we ate and we got horribly sick.  We went into a little restaurant and had different orders - mine being French toast.  It took about five bites and I was out the front door puking my guts up.  Daddy came out and sat with me until I was finished, cleaned me up and ordered some ice water - all the time telling me everything would be alright.  It was truly a wonderful vacation.

 

My dad committed suicide in '76 over a woman - the man had been married seven times and twice to two women at the same time.  His whole life was trying to impress people - always had to have more, needed more, drank more and gambled more.  For all his charades and women, drinking and gambling I still adored him.  I'd sit and watch him shave every morning and looked into those blue eyes and felt like everything was fine, until it wasn't.  Had we known about the medication that they give now back then, he would have been an awesome person.  He always will be to me, for all his faults and crutches.  He was something else.  I know God saw through all his craziness and let him join Him in heaven.  No one could turn down his charm - except my mom and for good reason.  I hold no grudges against anyone for any of this.  It was what it was, but I'd love to see him one more time - to tell him I love him and forgive him.  He deserves that - medical issues cause people to do strange things and they cannot help it.

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Social Butterfly

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 16 of 71

I've got quite a few.  Maybe getting a new puppy.  Or watching a baby calf being born.

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Treasured Social Butterfly

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

715 Views
Message 17 of 71

Boy these are great posts!  I have enjoyed reading them!

 

I have countless great memories, all centered around my family!  Everything from our daily lives together to our travels and holidays. I had the best mom and dad in the world and have always known what a blessing that was.  

Life's a Journey, not a Destination" Aerosmith
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Frequent Social Butterfly

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

751 Views
Message 18 of 71

I am sure this is not a fond memory, but it is a life lesson. Your hurt over forgetting your father's birthday was probably greater than his. But you did learn and never forgot again. On that day, your dad got lost in the shuffle, much like Samantha in Sixteen Candles.

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Trusted Social Butterfly

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

750 Views
Message 19 of 71

Awww!  @PattyDiane, What a poignant memory!  You have captured his disappointment  in your post and it's almost palpable.

 

Thank you for sharing such a vivid and highly personal memory...it really touched my heart!  Heart  Woman Happy

"Never succumb to the temptation of bitterness." ~ Rev. Martin Luther King, Jr.

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Valued Social Butterfly

Re: Fondest Childhood Memories?

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Message 20 of 71

Today would be my father's 107th birthday.  I remember when I was a child.  I don't remember how old, somewhere around 9 or 10, but Daddy's birthday and Easter happened to be on the same day.  Everyone had been excited about Easter, with new dresses, baskets, going to church, Sunday dinner with Grandmother, etc. that nobody remembered my Father's birthday.

 

I don't know if he realized it before dinner or not.  Perhaps he was expecting a cake to be brought out, but it was at dinner that he mentioned it.  I was the oldest and felt bad that I hadn't remembered.  I could tell he was hurt and so could my mother who teased him for pouting.  He didn't say anything then but I could tell that really hurt him.  I think Mother saw it too and dropped the subject but I swore I would never again forget Daddy's birthday.

 

I've thought of that so many times in the past 65 or so years and realized that I got a glimpse of my father's "inner child" that day.  My father had been the oldest of 9 children in a family with little money.  He never wanted to talk about his childhood very much, but I feel pretty certain that wasn't the first time his birthday had been forgotten.  But it was certainly the last.

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