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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Additionally I have screen shots of where one $15 Walmart gift card auction ended bidding at approx 65K in points and at the same time another $15 Walmart gift card ended bidding at approx $36K.  So the question is why would anyone bid on the $65K when the $32K was available?  This led me to research further, and this occurred rather frequently.  Additionally, sometimes only the 65k closed auction appeared and not the 32k.  So the databases that they were using to populate the website are being switched back and forth. Now there could be explanations that they were using a test database before the new rollout, but sure looks like fraud to me. It is as though someone who is collecting the data is also manipulating it.  

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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I agree, $4 million for a Versa is a bit steep. You have certainly done your homework! They should realize that getting beaten by bots on a website that should be more senior-friendly is incredibly disheartening. I've also noticed that all the points you're supposed to get just for logging on, for example, don't always show up. I do find the quizzes pretty useful though, since I often learn some tidbit of info I didn't know before. That's probably the best part of earning rewards points.
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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Well, there is the 75 points for logging in to add to the 150 points for the five 30-point dailies for 225. Where's the other 30?

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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I agree with tpschmidt1. Many of the auctions are insane.

Four examples during the last year or so:

1) On September 30, 2017, a $5.00 gift card for Home Depot went for 155,851 points, or by pennies, $1,558.51. That's over 311 times the value of the gift card. On a Daily Deal, that same card would go for 500 points.

2) On December 9, 2017, a $5.00 gift card for Walmart went for 140,001 points, or $1,400.01. That's 280 times the value of the gift card.

3) On July 17, 2017, a $5.00 gift card for Walmart went for 128,010 points, or $1,280.10. That's 256 times value.

4) On August 29, 2017, a $5.00 gift card for Brinker Restaurants went for 120,078 points, or $1,200.78. That's 240 times value.

Let's use the multiple of the first example to determine the cost of certain other items one might purchase:

Bananas: 54¢ a pound = $167.94 per pound

Avocados: 98¢ a pound = $304.78 per pound

Pork chops: $1.98 a pound = $615.78

Gallon of gas: $3.199 per gallon = $994.89

2018 Nissan Versa S Sedan (about the cheapest car available in the USA for 2018): $12,995 = $4,041,445 (yes, over $4 million!)

 

How many of us would bid $4 million on an auction for a base Nissan Versa? I know I wouldn't even if I had won a national lottery just before that.

 

Auctions seem to be a great way for RFG to get their points back no matter who or what is placing the bids.

 

Enjoy!

 

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Hi @Brightpool  Yeah, I look at my now 1,025,000 points as a 'discount bank' for retirement (which is in about 7 years).  

 

But I wanted to say that one can currently earn 255 daily points without the Fitbit gig and without breaking any rules or cheating in any way. Smiley Happy

 

Best wishes.

 

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Message 6 of 11

My 2¢ on points:
Anybody who spends hours amassing points is basically earning penny equivalents. Sure, many of the quizzes are informative and worth the time to take them - sometimes.
The daily quizzes are worth 30 points each. Compared to the trade value toward gift cards, that's 30 cents. Each morning, one can get 150 points, or $1.50 value, for taking the daily quizzes.

The fit points, as I understand them as an outsider, are directly related to the FitBit tracker. I have a Fitbit unit, but I can't wear it because it causes a nasty rash. I have tried to pair the Fitbit with AARP Rewards for Good with little success. For my trouble, I have earned nothing back from RFG with my $100 Fitbit and can't use it without the discomfort, no matter how active I want to be. I gave it to my wife, who also doesn't use it. It sits in a drawer.

It's too bad we can't find another way to track our fitness and get points. One that isn't tied to a particular expensive product on the market. My cell phone can track me for no extra cost, but that can't translate to RFG points. It must be a Fitbit unit.

RFG allows up to 5,000 points per day. The only time I get anywhere near that is when the annual quizzes are active. Tip: As I understand it, the year is counted from when you take the quiz, not by the calendar.

I can get just under 5,000 points per day for a few days and then it's back to my daily 150 on the daily quizzes with a weekly news quiz for 75 points, the occasional promotion word or phrase for 150 points, along with three weekly calculators and a few more monthly quizzes each month.

I have been using the Rewards for Good site for several years and have yet to break 700,000 points; although, I am close. With RFG's recent tightening of points available to earn and fewer prizes in their Sweepstakes and such, I have tightened up on my entries, too.

I am only guessing, but I think my best earnings have been about 2,000 points per hour for time spent on the AARP and Rewards sites. In pennies, that would be $20 worth, not $2.

I don't go to the store to buy things for more than their value; I almost always look for sale prices. When I shop on line, I also look around for the lowest price, including shipping and handling, if any. And, I don't bid higher than value on the RFG auctions. Maybe I'll never use up my points with this reasoning, but like many other folks on AARP, I was raised by two parents who survived the Depression of the '30s and my mind works that way.

As you might guess, I haven't won an auction since RFG changed to their latest way to bid, which is for a person to set up-front the number of points he or she is willing to pay, with the option to raise that number at any time, and then RFG will keep raising the bid against fellow bidders until the time runs out or highest points are reached, whichever occurs before the other.

I keep waiting for the time when those with millions of points to burn use them up by overbidding several times over and I can get something on the auctions while placing sane bids.
Enjoy!

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Message 7 of 11

Mystery to me too.  Note that many of the auctions only show 7 -10 bidders with multiple bids of 33-90.  Makes you wonder.

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Message 8 of 11

And I thought I was the only one who noticed some outlandish 6-figure winning bids in the auctions. I've also noticed that the daily deals are all "in carts" when I check in at 3:00 to 3:02 EST, which I guess is explained by the use of bots. WTH.

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Message 9 of 11

There are many theories as to how the points have been accummulated and many believe there is fraud.

The site only allows you to earn 5000 points a day from quizzes.  Once you have completed all the quizzes, this is impossible to earn 5000 a day.  You can earn points for linking your fitbit as well.  But generally this will not amass the number of points that some "accounts" have amassed.  

 

There are a few people who have never redeemed their points and have 6 figure balances, but the majority of the members of my facebook page that share the reward for good codes (150 pts per email), do not have that much accumulated.

 

When you redeem a reward that is mailed to you, you will also receive a 1,000 pt certificate.  Make sure that you notice it in the envelope.  The suggestion was posted on my page that maybe these certificates were stolen and sold by the outsourcing company or some other inside job as the person who got her reward did not get the 1,000 pt certificate on a couple of occasions.

 

AARP Rewards for Good changed the auction system last year (2017) and it seems to have brought down some of the exorbitant points winnings as the abusers have used up their balances. But the daily deal is still won primarily by bots.

 

The best way to use your points is for the discounts on the gift certificates and on power plays, unless you like to try the sweepstakes, but those may also  be skewed to the bots and abusers.

 

Still it's free!  and you can learn from it.  I just wish the team responsible for maintaining the program would just try to meet expectation.  I would evaluate the performance of the IT group as poor.

 

 

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Re: AARP Rewards for Good

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Message 10 of 11

Hi @tpschmitt1 Your calculations and observations are correct. While I share your fascination with the lunacy of grossly overspending for 'discounts' I doubt I can explain it.

 

There is a 5,000 earned point per day limit, so unless these 'people' (more likely bots) are able to supercede that confine, they, like me, have had to spend years amassing their points. I'm currently closing in on 1 million points. I've been amassing points for about 3 years. I have never played the R4G auctions because the point value one realizes there is insulting. Instead I have used points for a handful of discounted gift cards and, twice, the daily deal. But mostly I amass while patiently awaiting the day when there is something offered that I want at a price point I do not find insulting. Smiley Happy

 

That's my best and final answer. Smiley Happy

Epster

 

PS People also choose to play the lottery. They also smoke. And they drink and drive, eat at McDonald's, insist that this or that routine indulgence will not harm their health, refuse to workout. Et cetera. We cannot stop stupid. We can only try to avoid it.

 

 

"The key to success is to keep growing in all areas of life - mental, emotional, spiritual, as well as physical." Julius Erving
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